Your search returned 25 results in 13 document sections:

1 2
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Custom-house, (search)
New London, Stonington. Delaware—Wilmington. District of Columbia—Georgetown. Florida—Appalachicola, Cedar Keys, Fernandina, Jacksonville, Key West, Pensacola, St. Augustine, Tampa. Georgia—Atlanta, Brunswick, St. Mary's, Savannah. Illinois—Chicago, Galena. Indiana—Evansville, Indianapolis, Michigan City. Iowa—Burlington. Dubuque. Kentucky—Louisville, Paducah. Loulsiana—Brashear, New Orleans. Maine—Bangor, Bath, Belfast, Castine, Eastport, Ellsworth, Houlton, Kennebunk, Machias, Portland, Saco, Waldoborough, Wiscasset, York. Maryland—Annanolis, Baltimore. Crisfield. Massachusetts—Barnstable, Boston, Edgarton, Fall River, Gloucester, Marblehead, Nantucket, New Bedford, Newburyport, Plymouth. Salem. Michigan—Detroit, Grand Haven, Grand Rapids. Marquette, Port Huron. Minnesota—Duluth, St. Paul. Mississippi—Natchez, Shieldsborough, Vicksburg. Missouri—Kansas City, St. Joseph, St. Louis. Montana—Fort Benton.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Folsom, George 1802-1869 (search)
Folsom, George 1802-1869 Historian; born in Kennebunk, Me., May 23, 1802; graduated at Harvard in 1822; practised law in Massachusetts until 1837, when he removed to New York, where he became an active member of the Historical Society. He was appointed charge d'affaires at The Hague in 1850 and held the office for four years. He collected a valuable library and was the author of Sketches of Saco and Biddeford; Dutch annals of New York; Address on the discovery of Maine. He died in Rome, Italy, March 27, 1869.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Frost, John 1800-1859 (search)
Frost, John 1800-1859 Author; born in Kennebunk, Me., Jan. 26, 1800; graduated at Harvard in 1822; was the author of History of the world; Pictorial history of the United States; Book of the army; Book of the Navy, etc. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., Dec. 28, 1859. Soldier; born in Kittery, Me., May 5, 1738; was a captain of colonial troops in the Canadian campaign of 1759, and lieutenant-colonel at the siege of Boston in 1775. In 1776 he was promoted to colonel and served under General Gates until Burgoyne's surrender, when he was ordered to Washington's army and participated in the battle of Monmouth and other engagements. After the close of the war he was appointed judge of the court of sessions for York county. Me. He died in Kittery, Me., in July, 1810.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McCulloch, Hugh 1808- (search)
McCulloch, Hugh 1808- Financier; born in Kennebunk, Me., Dec. 7, 1808; was educated at Bowdoin College; and removed to Fort Wayne, Ind., in 1833, where lie practised law till 1835, when he became manager of a branch of the State Bank of Hugh McCulloch. Indiana. He remained in this post till 1856, when the charter of this branch expired, and then accepted the presidency of the newly organized State Bank of Indiana. In 1863 he was appointed comptroller of the currency under the new national banking law, and two years later became Secretary of the Treasury. At this time there was a tremendous financial strain upon the government, on account of the heavy war expenses. In less than six months, however, after his appointment as Secretary of the Treasury, a large amount of the money due 500,000 soldiers and sailors was paid, and besides the payment of other obligations a considerable reduction was made in the national debt. His conversion of more than $1,000,000,000 of short-tim
elsewhere, and at short intervals published Rolls of Missing Men, which, by the franks of some of her friends among the Members of Congress, were sent to all parts of the United States, and posted in prominent places, and in many instances copied into local papers. The method adopted for the discovery of information concerning these missing men, and the communication of that information to their friends who had made inquiries concerning them may be thus illustrated. A Mrs. James of Kennebunk, Maine, has seen a notice in the paper that Miss Clara Barton of Washington will receive inquiries from friends of missing men of the Army, and will endeavor to obtain information for them without fee or reward. She forthwith writes to Miss Barton that she is anxious to gain tidings of her husband, Eli James, Sergeant Company F. Fourth Maine Infantry, who has not been heard of since the battle of . This letter, when received, is immediately acknowledged, registered in a book, endorsed and
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 2: preparation for college; Monmouth and Yarmouth Academies (search)
the president of the Western University of Pennsylvania, located at Pittsburg and Allegheny. He developed that institution from small beginnings, attained a national reputation in educational circles and was, as long as he lived, my warm personal friend. The next morning after my arrival I sat with a class of twelve bright-looking young men facing Mr. Weld in a room filled with writing desks. He had become famous for fitting boys for college. Only one of the class, John Bullfinch, of Kennebunk, was younger than myself. Mr. Weld gave me a searching examination after the class had been dismissed, and told me that if I was diligent enough I might possibly enter college in 1846. His very manner aroused my ambition and made me determine to do everything in my power to accomplish that result. I had for a roommate John Pettengill, whom I had known at the Leeds brick schoolhouse. He belonged to the English Department and had studies entirely different from mine. He was kind an
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 11: early loves and love poetry (search)
istant relative of Whittier's, her maiden name being Mary Emerson Smith. Her grandmother, Mrs. Nehemiah Emerson, was a second cousin of Whittier's father. As a girl she was often at her grandfather Emerson's, and Whittier as a boy lived for a time at the same place, and attended school in that district. He called Mary's grandmother Aunt. Afterward they were fellow students at Haverhill Academy. When Whittier was editing the American Manufacturer, in Boston, she was at a seminary at Kennebunk, Me., and they were in correspondence, which showed a warm attachment on his part. I have seen the originals of these letters. There were several considerations which forbade thought of marriage on the part of either of them. She went to Cincinnati with her uncles, about 1831, and for this reason he planned to go West in 1832, but was prevented by a prospect of being elected to Congress from the Essex district. Up to the time of her marriage to Judge Thomas, Whittier's letters to her were
. 14 July 1763, and had Elizabeth Cutter, bap. 30 Dec. 1764; Stephen, bap. 22 Sept. 1765; Lydia, bap. 10 May 1767; Samuel and William, twins, b. in Cambridge 11 June 1768; John, bap. here 30 Aug. 1772, at which date Stephen the f. is styled of Kennebunk. 11. Francis, s. of Francis (8), m. Elizabeth Bowman of Cambridge 30 Dec. 1764, and had Elizabeth Sanders, bap. 13 Oct. 1765, d. 22 Aug. 1777; Francis, bap. 2 Aug. 1767. Francis the f. removed from Medf. to Boston, and his subsequent histo and from Worcester to Great Barrington by Springfield, and to Falmouth, in the County of Barnstable, and that post offices be kept as followeth, viz.: one at Cambridge; one at Salem; one at Ipswich; one at Haverhill; one at Newburyport; one at Kennebunk, or Welles; one at Falmouth, in the County of Cumberland; one at Georgetown, in the County of Lincoln; one at Worcester; one at Springfield; one at Great Barrington; one at Plymouth; one at Sandwich; one at Falmouth, in the County of Barnstable
. 14 July 1763, and had Elizabeth Cutter, bap. 30 Dec. 1764; Stephen, bap. 22 Sept. 1765; Lydia, bap. 10 May 1767; Samuel and William, twins, b. in Cambridge 11 June 1768; John, bap. here 30 Aug. 1772, at which date Stephen the f. is styled of Kennebunk. 11. Francis, s. of Francis (8), m. Elizabeth Bowman of Cambridge 30 Dec. 1764, and had Elizabeth Sanders, bap. 13 Oct. 1765, d. 22 Aug. 1777; Francis, bap. 2 Aug. 1767. Francis the f. removed from Medf. to Boston, and his subsequent histo and from Worcester to Great Barrington by Springfield, and to Falmouth, in the County of Barnstable, and that post offices be kept as followeth, viz.: one at Cambridge; one at Salem; one at Ipswich; one at Haverhill; one at Newburyport; one at Kennebunk, or Welles; one at Falmouth, in the County of Cumberland; one at Georgetown, in the County of Lincoln; one at Worcester; one at Springfield; one at Great Barrington; one at Plymouth; one at Sandwich; one at Falmouth, in the County of Barnstable
Journal, Aug. 5, 1863, p. 4, col. 7. — Error by which Mrs. Slack of Boston was enrolled and drafted. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 1, p. 13. — Speech of Sen. Henry Wilson on the act for enrolling and calling out the national forces, at Kennebunk, Maine, Sept. 7, 1863. Boston Evening Journal, Sept. 8, 1863, p. 4, cols. 4, 5. Soldiers' Grand Review at Washington, D. C., May 23, 24, 1865. Editorial on event. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, p. 632. — Orders of Gens. Grant and Shermanlavery compromises. Abridged report. Boson Evening Journal, Feb. 23, 1861, p. 1, cols. 2-5. — – Text of. Boston Evening Journal, March 4, 1863, p. 4, cols. 3-5. — Speech on the act for enrolling and calling out the national forces, at Kennebunk, Me., Sept. 7, 1863. Boston Evening Journal, Sept. 8, 1863, p. 4, cols. 4, 5. — Text of letter to Fernando Wood, defending the act for enrolling the national forces, and explaining its provisions. Boston Evening Journal, March 31, 1863,
1 2