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Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General . 36 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for La Grange (Georgia, United States) or search for La Grange (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 4.21 (search)
both physical and mental. There is intense and grievous disappointment felt at only one of thirty officers being chosen for exchange. October 27th Wrote a long letter by Private Watkins, of Fourteenth North Carolina, to my sister in La Grange, Georgia. He promised to conceal it until he can mail it on his arrival at Savannah. Few letters by flag of truce are ever forwarded. October 28th After eating my meagre breakfast, and lying down, discouraged and troubled at my failure to bet. Dr. Knowles took the names of a large number, who are to be sent to Point Lookout, we hopefully suppose for exchange. I am one of the rejoicing number. November 17th, 18th and 19th At the suggestion of Private Henry Curtright, of La Grange, Georgia, a wounded fellow prisoner, I write to Mrs. Joanna, D. C. 178 Preston street. She knows my relations in Georgia well, and may be able to communicate with them for me. A number of nurses and convalescents have been sent to Fort McHenry. I u
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 5.29 (search)
pectors who examine all letters and condemn hundreds of them, or I would never have been permitted to receive it. Sam says it is bitter cold at Elmira, and he has but one blanket. They have snows several feet deep. Poor Dick Noble, from Big hungry, near Tuskegee, died a prisoner at Elmira. He was a faithful fellow. A kind letter was received, too, from Mr. J. W. Fellows, of Manchester, New Hampshire, who, with Professor William Johns, prepared me for college at Brownwood Institute, La Grange, Georgia, in 1859. He is now practicing law, and is an uncompromising Democrat. He has lived among the Southern people, formed friendships there, and understands their peculiar institution — slavery. His letter is very kind and full of sympathy, and he offers to aid me. Alfred Parkins, of Winchester, a prisoner in the Bull pen, as the quarters of the privates is designated, came to see Lieutenant Arrington, having as a guard over him a coal-black, brutal-looking negro soldier, an escaped con
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.35 (search)
o over and two undershirts, two pairs drawers, two pairs socks, two silk handkerchiefs, one pair shoes, two bars of soap and two combs. All my room-mates gathered around the box, looking admiringly at each article, as it was taken out, and warmly congratulating me on my good fortune. The noble friends (Mr. and Mrs. Coulter) who have thus gladdened me by their timely and generous present, have my warmest gratitude. Mrs. Coulter was the accomplished and wealthy Miss Joanna Douglas, of La Grange, Georgia, and we are known to each other only by family name and character. How my dear mother's gentle heart would warm towards them, and how earnestly would she invoke God's kindest blessing upon them, if she only knew of their disinterested, Christian conduct towards her suffering, destitute, imprisoned boy. They will surely reap an abundant reward. January 1st to February 2d, 1865 A number of officers, captured in Georgia by Sherman, arrived, and were quartered in adjoining rooms. A