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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 648 528 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 229 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 215 31 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 134 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 133 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 112 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 98 38 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 97 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 95 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 80 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Louisville (Kentucky, United States) or search for Louisville (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
o hold herself independent of both sides, and to compel both sides to respect the inviolability. A large meeting in Louisville, addressed by James Guthrie, ex-secretary of the treasury; Hon. Arch. Dixon, Hon. John Young Brown, and other strong Ump Clay, near Cincinnati, Colonel Guthrie recruited the First, and Maj. W. E. Woodruff the Second Kentucky infantry. In Louisville, under the name of the Union Club, a secret organization, a force amounting to over one thousand was raised and armed camp Dick Robinson in the following order: Special orders no. 3. Headquarters Department of the Cumberland, Louisville, Ky., September 10, 1861. I, Brig.-Gen. Geo. H. Thomas having reported for duty, will repair to Camp Dick Robinson, anfor arrests they began them at any rate, the first victims being ex-Gov. Charles S. Morehead and Col. R. T. Durrett, of Louisville, who on the night of the 18th of September, 1861, were dragged from their beds and without warrant or charge preferred
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
the Confederate army were two companies from Louisville, under command of Capts. Ben Anderson and From Harrison county, and three companies from Louisville under Capts. John D. Pope, J. B. Harvey and M. Lapielle, left Louisville for Nashville. They numbered about three hundred men. At Nashville thed a battalion under Major Blanton Duncan, of Louisville, who had been active in assisting to raise tg the most active in recruiting companies in Louisville. The first three became officers of the Sec been on the ground with General Anderson at Louisville, but nominally without command, and was thorreen river with a heavy force on the road to Louisville, and an attack might be daily expected, whic It was recruited by Col. Thomas H. Hunt, of Louisville, after the occupation of Louisville by the FLouisville by the Federals, and went into service with a temporary organization, which was not completed until some timty, Miss., and made in Memphis. Citizens of Louisville aided in the further equipment of the batter[8 more...]
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
and destroy the Salt river bridge, that the troops along the line of the railroad might be prevented from returning to Louisville. On the following morning I moved on toward Lebanon, distant 35 miles from Barren [Green] river. At 11 o'clock at n, so I moved [21st] on to Crab Orchard. There I attached my portable battery to the telegraph leading from Stanford to Louisville and learned the exact position of the enemy's forces and directed my movements accordingly. Leaving Crab Orchard at ults narrated so clearly in his report. It convulsed the whole Federal organization in General Buell's department from Louisville and Cincinnati to Huntsville, Ala., at which latter place General Buell had his headquarters. At the time Morgan was between Glasgow and Lebanon, the military commander of Kentucky, at Louisville, telegraphed General Buell that he had 1, 800 men at Munfordville, and next day, July 12, Morgan has over 1,500 men; his force is increasing. All the rebels in the State w
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
d, and Eastern Kentucky occupied Scott's cavalry battle of Richmond great Confederate victory occupation of Lexington and Frankfort and the country East of Louisville to the Ohio river enthusiastic Reception by the people ample supplies Confederate recruits. The publication by the Federal government of the official recod and Shelbyville on the 4th. It was one of the most decisive victories of the war, and at one stroke practically caused the evacuation of all Kentucky east of Louisville and south of Cincin- nati. On the 2d, General Smith occupied Lexington with a portion of his infantry, sending a small force to Frankfort and General Heth withes and mules came into his possession, and he was received with the greatest enthusiasm by the people, the leading Union men having fled with the legislature to Louisville. The Confederate flag was everywhere displayed, and recruiting camps were at once established in the vicinity of Lexington for the formation of cavalry regimen
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 11: (search)
ng lines, arrived at Glasgow with the former on the 12th and the latter on the 13th. General Bragg remained at Glasgow until the afternoon of the 15th to rest his troops and replenish subsistence and forage supply, as he had started from Chattanooga with but ten days rations, which had been depleted before leaving Sparta. He had on his arrival at Glasgow occupied Cave City with the brigades of Generals J. R. Chalmers and J. K. Duncan, thus cutting the railroad between Bowling Green and Louisville. General Buell had in the meantime advanced to Bowling Green, 30 miles nearly due west from Glasgow, with six divisions. It was at no time the intention of General Bragg to attack Buell at Bowling Green, as he well knew the strength of that position, and the questions of supply and a base would not have admitted of a siege. His purpose was to move to a junction with Kirby Smith in the direction of Lexington via Lebanon, when he was diverted by an unforeseen occurrence. General Chalm
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 12: (search)
Lexington and Frankfort inauguration of Governor Hawes Buell's arrival in Louisville and unexpected movement Sill's feint on Frankfort Bragg's sudden evacuation double his strength and had thrown himself across General Buell's path, with Louisville less than seventy-five miles distant and Buell moving on him from Bowling Greals on both sides. On the other hand it would not have been wise to march to Louisville without a junction with Kirby Smith, whose force was scattered watching Gen. es, be in position to effect early junction with Kirby Smith for advance upon Louisville, and to connect himself with his new line of communication south, via Cumberl his forces with a view to early concentration at Bardstown for a movement on Louisville. The messages were delivered within forty-eight hours and immediate steps we the capital. In the meantime General Buell, whose army had all arrived at Louisville on the 29th of September, being fully equipped and reinforced by a large body
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
f the war. Out of 15,000 of all arms, the Confederate loss was 3,396—510 killed, 2,635 wounded and 251 missing. The total Federal casualties were 4,241—845 killed, 2,851 wounded and 515 missing. General Halleck states that General Buell had at Louisville 100,000 men; but the latter in his report gives his whole force which left Louisville as 58,000, including cavalry and artillery, his three corps being about equal in number, say 18,000 each. The Confederates lost no general officers, but GeneLouisville as 58,000, including cavalry and artillery, his three corps being about equal in number, say 18,000 each. The Confederates lost no general officers, but Generals P. R. Cleburne, S. A. M. Wood and John C. Brown, commanding brigades, were wounded. One of the most remarkable features of the battle is that General Buell in his report says he did not know that a battle was being fought until 4:30 o'clock, over two hours after it began. General Buell's statement in review of the evidence before the Military Commission. Rebellion Records, Vol. XVI, Part x, page 51. General McCook's testimony, Ib., page 90. About midnight the Confederate army was
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
ment of the battle of Perryville and Bragg's retreat, on the 18th of October replied: The rapid march of your army from Louisville and your victory at Perryville have given great satisfaction to the government, these being the first words of commenda to him in this interval, warning him that he would be removed if he did not show better results, and on his arrival at Louisville he had been met with orders to turn over his command to General Thomas, but the latter protested that this was unjust aal Buell and assume command of his forces. On the 30th General Rosecrans presented his credentials to General Buell at Louisville, together with instructions to the latter from General Halleck to repair to Indianapolis and await further orders. Theeral losses in this campaign was the death of General Nelson, who was killed in a personal encounter in the Galt House, Louisville, September 29th, by Gen. Jeff. C. Davis, of the Federal army. Kentucky, again secure in the occupation of the Federa
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
ly excelled by the brilliancy of the Confederate success. But now, when the Federal infantry was advancing, General Morgan executed a movement for the diversion of the enemy, which in its conception and details constituted the most remarkable cavalry exploit of the war. Moving to the rear of Rosecrans with his cavalry division of 2,500 men, he crossed the Cumberland river at Burkes-ville on the 2d of July, passed through Columbia, Lebanon and Bardstown to Brandenburg, forty miles below Louisville, and there on the 8th crossed the Ohio into Indiana, drawing after him large bodies of Federal cavalry and infantry and having a number of heavy engagements. Thence he swept through Corydon, Salem and other towns, until on the 13th he was in the vicinity of Cincinnati, having captured many troops, and with the hue and cry of two States raised against him. He was pursued and sought to be headed by large bodies of the enemy's cavalry and infantry, drawn from all quarters. With little time
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Appendix A. (search)
l vacancies. The existing constitution and laws were declared to be in force except where inconsistent with the acts of that convention and of the legislative council. George W. Johnson, of Scott county, was elected governor; Robert McKee, of Louisville, secretary of state, and Orlando F. Payne, assistant secretary of state; Theodore L. Burnett, of Spencer county, treasurer, who resigned December 17th, and J. B. Burnham, of Warren county, was appointed in his place; Richard Hawes, of Bourbon county, auditor, who resigned, and Joshua Pillsbury was appointed in his place. A. Frank Brown, of Bourbon county, was chosen clerk of the council; John B. Thompson, Jr., of Mercer county, sergeant-at-arms, and Walter N. Haldeman, of Louisville, State printer. An ordinance of secession was adopted, and Henry C. Burnett, William E. Simms and William Preston were sent as commissioners to Richmond, and on the 10th day of December, 1862, the Confederate Congress admitted Kentucky as a member of the
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