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The Daily Dispatch: August 9, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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elderly physician and friend, who accompanied her in a carriage across the mountains, as the public conveyances between those hostile regions are, of course, discontinued. Before she had travelled many days she was compelled to stop at a small house on the roadside, and there, with much kindness from the hostess, and from her travelling companion, but none of the comforts to which she had been accustomed, she suffered intensely for many days, and then attempted to go on. She reached Georgetown, Kentucky, which was her summer home; her mother was telegraphed for, and reached her just three days before she breathed her last. Dear H.! another victim of the war; as much so as was her brother, who received his mortal wound at Dranesville, or her brother-in-law, who was shot through the heart at Pea Ridge. Her poor mother deemed it a blessed privilege to be able to be with her in her dying hour; a comfort which she did not experience after her long trip to see her son. I fear she will si
Knoxville, July 24.--Col. John H. Morgan sends by special courier to the headquarters of Tennessee, a despatch dated Georgetown, Ky., nineteenth instant. He states that he had taken eleven cities and towns, with a very heavy amount of army stores, and that he has a force sufficient to hold all the country outside of Lexington and Frankfort, which places are ch<*>y garrisoned by home guards.--Petersburgh Express, July 26.
ntietam. After Jackson's death, Lieutenant-General R. S. Ewell succeeded to the corps, after it had been temporarily headed by Stuart and A. P. Hill. On May 30, 1863, two divisions were detached to enter the Third Army Corps. The corps was commanded by Lieutenant-General J. A. Early in the Shenandoah campaign of 1864, and in the closing months of the war around Petersburg, by Lieutenant-General John B. Gordon. Major-General Gustavus Woodson Smith ´╝łU. S.M. A. 1842) was born in Georgetown, Kentucky, January 1, 1822, and served in the Mexican War. He resigned from the army in 1854 to enter upon a Cuban expedition under Quitman, and afterward settled in New York City. At the outbreak of the Civil War he joined the Confederate forces at New Orleans, under Lovell. In September, 1861, he was appointed major-general and was given command of the Second Corps, Army of the Potomac, which was continued in the Army of Northern Virginia, until March 23, 1862, when he was put at the head o
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Michigan, (search)
s a part of the Northwest Territory, and afterwards it formed a part of the Territory of Indiana. It was erected into an independent Territory in 1805, with William Hull (q. v.) as its first governor. In August, 1812, it fell into the hands of the British (see Detroit), and remained so until the fall of 1813, when General Harrison reconquered it (Thames, battle of the). In consequence of alarming despatches from Hull, in Detroit, in July, 1812, a force to support him was organized at Georgetown, Ky.; but before it had crossed the Ohio news of the surrender at Detroit reached them. That event stirred the patriotic zeal of the whole Western country, and the greatest warlike enthusiasm prevailed. Volunteers gathered under local leaders in every direction. Companies were formed and equipped in a single day, and were ready to march the next. They passed over the Ohio from Kentucky, Pennsylvania, and Virginia; and the governor of Ohio sent forward 2,000 men under General Tupper for t
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
d until appointed secretary of war. He assumed the duties of that portfolio March 24, 1862, and resigned them on November 17 of the same year, then reporting for duty in the field. He was one of the commissioners sent by Virginia to consult President Lincoln, after his election. He died at Edge Hill, Va., April 10, 1878. Gustavus W. Smith Gustavus W. Smith, who was acting secretary of war for the brief period between November 17, 1862, and November 21, 1862, was born in Georgetown, Scott county, Kentucky, January 1, 1822. At the age of sixteen years he entered West Point military academy, was graduated in 1842, and appointed brevet second-lieutenant in the corps of engineers; promoted second-lieutenant, 1845; joined the army in Mexico in 1846. By the death of his captain he was thrown into command of the only company of engineers in the army, and in that rank participated in the siege of Vera Cruz, and the battles of Cerro Gordo, Contreras, Churubusco, Chapultepec and City of
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
lature of Kentucky, and in 1880 he was a delegate to the Democratic convention that nominated General Hancock for the presidency. Most of his time was occupied, however, with his lucrative law practice and in the pleasant retirement of his elegant home. Here he died on September 21, 1887, sincerely mourned, not only by his family and large circle of friends, but throughout the bounds of his native State. Major-General Gustavus W. Smith Major-General Gustavus W. Smith was born at Georgetown, Ky., January 1, 1822. At the age of sixteen years he entered West Point military academy, and in 1842 he was graduated with a lieutenancy of engineers. Joining the army in Mexico in 1846, by the death of his captain he was thrown into command of the only company of engineers in the army, and in that capacity served in the siege of Vera Cruz, and the battles of the following campaign. He was commended by General Scott and brevetted captain for gallantry at Cerro Gordo. In 1849 he became
sing the brigades of Wallace, Moody, Ransom and Wise, South Carolina, Alabama, North Carolina and Virginia troops; was engaged in severe fighting preceding and during the retreat, and after the battle of Sailor's Creek was ordered by General Lee to collect all the scattered forces of Anderson's and Ewell's commands. In 1866 he resumed his favorite occupation, that of a teacher, and served as professor of engineering, mechanics and natural philosophy in the Western military institute at Georgetown, Ky., until 1880. On December 7th of that year he died at Brighton, Ill., at the age of sixty-three years. Brigadier-General William McComb Brigadier-General William McComb, a gallant Tennessee soldier, was a native of Pennsylvania. About 1856 he went to Montgomery county, Tenn., where he engaged in superintending the erection of a large flouring mill at Price's landing, on the Cumberland river. In that section of the State he was living at the beginning of the civil war. Since hi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), United Confederate Veterans. (search)
bers, 200; deaths, 10. Camp 91. Atlanta, Texas; Capt. J. D. Johnson, corn. Camp 92. Sweetwater, Texas; Capt. W. D. Beall, com. Camp 93. Montague, Texas; Capt. Bob Bean, corn. Camp 94. Mexia, Texas; Capt. C. L. Watson, com.; med. offi., J. S. L. Tray, M. D.; private; members, 136; disabled, 12; deaths, 10. Camp 95. Paris, Ky.; Capt. A. T. Forcythe, corn. Camp 96. Harrodsburg, Ky.; Capt. Bush. W. Allen, corn. Camp 97. Versailles, Ky.; Capt. Jos. C. Bailey, com. Camp 98. Georgetown, Ky.; A. H. Sinclair, com.; members, 31; Camp 99. Cynthiana, Ky.; D. M. Snyder, com. Camp 100. Lexington, Ky.; John Boyd, corn.; med offi., Dr. Jno. A. Lewins; members (12 Camps), 550; indigent, 6 or 8; deaths, 6. Camp 101. Lawrenceburg, Ky.; Capt. P. H. Thomas, corn. Camp 102. Narasota, Texas; Capt. W. E. Barry, com. Camp 103. Austin, Texas; Capt. W. W. Brown, com. Camp 104. Fernandina, Fla. Camp 105. Galveston, Texas; Gen. T. N. Waul, com. Camp 106. Frost, Texas; C
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), William Preston Johnston. (search)
e, Ky., January 5, 1831. He lost his mother when he was four years of age, and his father shortly afterward cast his fortunes with the young Republic of Texas. He was reared by maternal relations in Louisville, by Mrs. Josephine Rogers, and, after her death, by General William Preston and wife, and he received his earlier education in the schools of that city. Later he attended the academy of S. V. Womack at Shelbyville; Center College, Danville, and the Western Military Institute at Georgetown, Ky. He had always been of a studious disposition, so that at a period when boys are devoted chiefly to play and light study, he was engrossed in reading standard works of ancient and modern history. As a consequence, at Yale he almost immediately took a leading position in his class in scholarship, and was especially prominent for his literary taste and excellence in composition, taking a Townsend prize for English composition; and among many candidates in the final competition, he was as
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