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we find the following: Battle Manassas, Descriptive Fantasia, Soldier's March in Camp, Cannon's Booming, Trumpet call the Alarm, Yankee Doodle Advancing, Dixie Answering, Yankee Doodle and Dixie Fighting, Dixie played in the Right Hand, Yankee Doodle in the Left Hand, Yankee Doodle Running, Dixie Victorious, Sweeping the Field. The blockade. The Charleston Mercury, of the 19th, has the following: The steamer Nina, Capt. Davis, left this port early yesterday, for Georgetown, S. C. Soon after getting to sea she was chased by a propeller, which gained on her rapidly and compelled her to return. Capt. Davis informs us that he saw five vessels near this place--one off Bull's Island, a second off Dewees, a third well off shore, and two near Ship Bar. One of them had a schooner without a fore-topmast in tow, which is supposed to be the same vessel that was noticed some days ago near Stono. Sale of a vessel. The Mercury thus records the sale of a brig in C
ed, Seventy-three prisoners fell into the hands of the Confederates. A small Federal steamer was off Smithville on Saturday evening with a white flag flying, but she could not be seen or found on yesterday. [second Dispatch.] Wilmington, N. C., Nov. 4. --Seventy-three prisoners from the Federal steamer Union, arrived at Goldsboro' at noon to-day, and were immediately sent forward to Raleigh under guard. It is currently reported here that three Federal transports went ashore near Georgetown, S. C. Several of the crews, including two negroes, were lodged in Georgetown jail on yesterday. Charleston, Nov. 4 --It is reported that two of Lincoln's gun-boats were beached on the coast of South Carolina, and the crews taken prisoners by the Confederate troops, during the storm which prevailed on Friday and Saturday. [second Dispatch.] Charleston, Nov. 4. P. M. --The beaching of the gun-boats on the coast of South Carolina has been confirmed.
The blockade off Georgetown, S. C. --The Charleston, S. C., Courier, of the 2d instant has received a letter from a gentleman living near Georgetown, South Carolina, which says: "Our little harbor has been watched for some time by a large bark, doubtless one of Lincoln's apes. It has more the appearance of a full grown mastiff searching for mice than a man of war vessel. "The rice crop in this section is very good and the harvest nearly over. If abraham I. wishes to procure a letter from a gentleman living near Georgetown, South Carolina, which says: "Our little harbor has been watched for some time by a large bark, doubtless one of Lincoln's apes. It has more the appearance of a full grown mastiff searching for mice than a man of war vessel. "The rice crop in this section is very good and the harvest nearly over. If abraham I. wishes to procure some for his subjects, he has only to send and we are prepared to give his ambassador a warm reception."
The Daily Dispatch: November 9, 1861., [Electronic resource], The effect of the late storm on the Federal fleet. (search)
he Lincoln transport Osceola. The Charleston Courier, of Wednesday, has the following account of the loss of the Federal transport Osceola: Capt. Morritt, of the Yankee transport steam propelier Osceola, arrived here yesterday from Georgetown, S. C., in charge of Captains Pinckney and Mazyck, and was taken to the Guard-House, at which place we saw him, when in answer to questions he made the following statement: The Ocsceola sailed from New York on Thursday, October 24th, for Hampton nn. Vol. A Spanish steamer in Distress. The Charlefton Courier says: The late southeast gale has done considerable damage on the coast Capt. Reynais, of the Spanish steamer Neustra Sonora de Ragla, arrived here yesterday from Georgetown, S. C. His steamer was from New York bound of Havana, where she is intended for a ferry boat, and she has suffered from the late stormy weather, having been ashore near Ocracocke, N. C., and has put into Georgetown, S. C. with machinery disabled a
isted men. This looks like an early resumption of active military operations. From South Carolina--a flagship sunk. A dispatch from Philadelphia, to the Baltimore American of Monday afternoon, gives the following, which is all the Northern papers have from Sherman's field of operations: The United States steam transport Massachusetts has arrived. She reports that our naval forces captured Fort White, a splendid work, mounting seventeen heavy guns, situated just below Georgetown, South Carolina; after which the sailors and marines landed and captured Georgetown. The rebel cavalry made a charge on them in the streets, but were gallantly repulsed, with a loss of several killed and wounded and some prisoners. Our loss was one man killed, belonging to the navy. Admiral Dahlgren's flagship Harvest Moon, on her way down, was sunk by a torpedo. All hands were saved excepting the ward room steward. From Wilmington. A dispatch from Fortress Monroe, dated the 4th,
nothing positively has been heard since the 24th of February. He was then at Camden, on the Wateree river, one hundred and ten miles, on air line, southwest of Fayetteville, or about one hundred and twenty-five miles by the main travel road through Cheraw. His cavalry are almost certainly in Fayetteville by this time, and the infantry in close proximity. Supplies will await him at that point should he touch it, sent up the Cape Fear river by Schofield. The Yankees captured Georgetown, South Carolina, a little town on the coast, and in the official report of it the naval commander says: I have directed Commander Creighton to proceed carefully up Black river, and have dispatched the tug Catalpa, with Lieutenant-Commander Henry and Ensign Glass, prepared to open communication, by the army code of signals, with General Sherman, who is said to be some twelve miles off. Officers from General Schofield's army, who left Wilmington the 1st instant, bring the important intel
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