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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 113 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 103 7 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1 60 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 40 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 38 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 36 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 34 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman .. You can also browse the collection for Monterey (California, United States) or search for Monterey (California, United States) in all documents.

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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 1: early recollections of California. 1846-1848. (search)
ip and march up the hill to the fort at Monterey, California, carrying his own knapsack and equipmenhing could be more peaceful in its looks than Monterey in January, 1847. We had already made the acablished comfortably. We found the people of Monterey a mixed set of Americans, native Mexicans, anwn lame horse, which he was to bring to me at Monterey, when I was to pay him ten dollars for the otmmissary of subsistence, and was stationed at Monterey and relieved me as commissary, so that I reveng with me. lie asked me, Where? and I said, Monterey. Why? I would explain that more at leisure.ain Selfridge commanding. I then returned to Monterey by land, and, when the Dale arrived, Colonel ts, and Naglee's company was sent to him from Monterey, and these three companies occupied Lower Calent in that direction, and we continued on to Monterey, our party all the way giving official sancti Angeles, and the one company of artillery at Monterey. Nearly all business had ceased, except that[32 more...]
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 2: early recollections of California--(continued). 1849-1850. (search)
The department headquarters still remained at Monterey, but, with the few soldiers, we had next to nned to command Company F, Third Artillery, at Monterey. Captain Warner remained at Sacramento, survprice. As for coal, there was not a pound in Monterey, or anywhere else in California. Vessels wit, and had been distributed, four companies to Monterey, and the rest somewhat as Stevenson's regimen the ladies for home and we for Monterey. At Monterey we went on shore, and Colonel Mason, who meanere held, and the convention was assembled at Monterey. Dr. Semple was elected president; and Gwin,acific coast. Shortly after returning from Monterey, I was sent by General Smith up to Sacramentos on leave. Wanting to see my old friends in Monterey, I arranged for my passage in the steamer of ars for passage to New York, and went down to Monterey by land, Rucker accompanying me. The weather t Santa Clara was under water; but we reached Monterey in time. I again was welcomed by my friends,[3 more...]
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 3: Missouri, Louisiana, and California. 1850-1855. (search)
quaintance of the voyage, and what she herself had told me, viz., that she expected to meet her husband, who lived about Mokelumne Hill. He then informed me that she was a woman of the town. Society in California was then decidedly mixed. In due season the steamship Lewis got under weigh. She was a wooden ship, long and narrow, bark-rigged, and a propeller; very slow, moving not over eight miles an hour. We stopped at Acapulco, and, in eighteen days, passed in sight of Point Pinos at Monterey, and at the speed we were traveling expected to reach San Francisco at 4 A. M. the next day. The cabin. passengers, as was usual, bought of the steward some champagne and cigars, and we had a sort of ovation for the captain, purser, and surgeon of the ship, who were all very clever fellows, though they had a slow and poor ship. Late at night all the passengers went to bed, expecting to enter the port at daylight. I did not undress, as I thought the captain could and would run: in at ni
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 9: battle of Shiloh. March and April, 1862. (search)
ision, and that of General Hurlbut, at Pittsburg Landing; to take positions well back, and to leave room for his whole army; telling me that he would soon come up in person, and move out in force to make the lodgment on the railroad, contemplated by General Halleck's orders. Lieutenant-Colonel McPherson, of General C. F. Smith's, or rather General Halleck's, staff, returned with me, and on tile 16th of March we disembarked and marched out about ten miles toward Corinth, to a place called Monterey or Pea Ridge, where the rebels had a cavalry regiment, which of course decamped on our approach, but from the people we learned that trains were bringing large masses of men from every direction into Corinth. McPherson and I reconnoitred the ground well, and then returned to our boats. On the 18th, Hurlbut disembarked his division and took post about a mile and a half out, near where the roads branched, one leading to Corinth and the other toward Hamburg. On the 19th I disembarked my div