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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 28, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 3 document sections:

The Daily Dispatch: December 28, 1865., [Electronic resource], The railroad projected by the Baltimore and Ohio railroad company in the Valley of Virginia. (search)
e world and the rest of mankind not to offer an unavailing opposition. The great locomotive, New England, it seems, is on the railroad of Destiny, dragging along the thirty-odd cars that pass for Stthe Senator upon the facts involved in his statement. We put aside the well-known truth that New England would have cut but a sorry figure in the revolutionary war had she not received the assistanca long time, and very notably in the case of the Missouri restriction. The side to which New England belonged succeeded in the late war. The side to which the Dutch belonged was triumphant at Waory. This was, of course, an absurdity, but it was not a greater absurdity than the claim of New England to a triumph obtained by the united arms of twenty-four States. Besides, Senator Wilson shoun should reflect that the end is not yet. In another year, if the New England party go on as they are going on now, they may be beaten at the polls, and expelled from power and plunder. Who knows?
d egress of visitors to the New Year's levee. Workmen are engaged preparing a temporary outlet from one of the windows of the East Room, so as to give an easy means of retiring. The covering for the hall carpet is being laid, and the new curtains for the East Room are expected in time to be suspended by that day. It is to be hoped that relic hunters will leave knives and scissors at home, and not mutilate the new curtains. Senator Sumner's attack on the President. Several of the New England Republican newspapers disclaim any responsibility for Mr. Sumner's white-washing speech — among them the Hartford Courant, warmly. The issue joined. We have the programme announced simultaneously at New York by Mr. Greeley, and at Washington by General Banks, that the coercive power of the Government is to be exercised upon the Southern States until they shall concede the elective franchise to the negro. We may regard the issue [between these men and President Johnson] as fairly
hat men keep alive, in all its freshness, the spirit of a great ancestry, and not only render just homage to their fame, but identify the affections of the living with the glorious dead, and transmit their illustrious example from generation to generation. The founders of the Virginia colony entitled themselves to as distinguished honors at the hands of their posterity as any founders of empire in ancient or modern times. Their great leader, Captain John Smith, who, by the way, gave New England its name, and made a map of that colony that is still considered valuable, was one of the master spirits of the age, equally distinguished by heroin actions and practical sense, and second to no man but one in the annals of Virginia's illustrious sons. The figure of this man stands out in bold relief upon the page of history — the most energetic, the most intrepid, the most chivalric, and yet the most common-sense and practical man of his time. The truth that, for all great movements a