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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Howell, George Rogers 1833- (search)
Howell, George Rogers 1833- Clergyman; born in Southampton, N. Y., June 15, 1833; graduated at Yale College in 1854, and at the Princeton Theological Seminary in 1864. His publications include The early history of Southampton, L. I., with genealogies; and a number of papers, including Linguistic discussions; The open polar sea; Heraldry in America, etc. Howell, George Rogers 1833- Clergyman; born in Southampton, N. Y., June 15, 1833; graduated at Yale College in 1854, and at the Princeton Theological Seminary in 1864. His publications include The early history of Southampton, L. I., with genealogies; and a number of papers, including Linguistic discussions; The open polar sea; Heraldry in America, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Johnes, Edward Rodolph 1852- (search)
Johnes, Edward Rodolph 1852- Lawyer; born in Whitesboro, N. Y., Sept. 8, 1852; graduated at Yale College in 1873 and at Columbia Law School in 1876. He was the Venezuelan representative in the boundary dispute of that country and also counsel in the Nicaragua and Costa Rica boundary case. His publications include The Monroe doctrine as applied to Venezuelan boundary question; English and American bankruptcy and insolvency laws; History of Southampton, R. I., etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New England. (search)
d by Capt Daniel Howe, attempted a settlement at Cow Neck, in North Hempstead, Long Island, when they tore down the arms of the Prince of Orange which they found upon a tree, and carved in place of the Early settlers in New England. shield a grinning face. Howe and his companions were driven off by the Dutch, and settled on the eastern extremity of Long Island. Some New Haven people took possession of Southold, on the Sound; and only a few years later, Hempstead, Jamaica, Flushing, Southampton, East Hampton, Brookhaven, Huntington, and Oyster Bay were settled by the English and some of them were united to Connecticut politically, until after the surrender of New Netherland to the English in 1664, when all Long Island came under the jurisdiction of New York (q. v.). In 1640 a New England captain purchased some land on the Delaware River of the Indians. Early the next spring colonists from New England, led by Robert Cogswell, sailed from the Connecticut for the Delaware in
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Samuels, Samuel 1823- (search)
Samuels, Samuel 1823- Seaman; born in Philadelphia, Pa., March 14, 1823; went to sea when eleven years old as cabin-boy, and advanced to merchant captain when twenty-one years old; commanded the Dreadnaught for several years; captain of the United States steamship John Rice in 1863-64; general superintendent of the quartermaster's department in New York City in 1864; commanded the McClellan at the taking of Fort Fisher in 1865; captain of the Fulton in 1866; the Henrietta yacht in her race from New York to Southampton; the Dauntless in her race with the Cambria from Queenstown to New York in 1870, and with the Comet in 1877. He organized the Samana Bay Company of Santo Domingo in 1872; and later was at the head of several large business enterprises. Captain Samuels published a nar- The Golden Gate, San Francisco. rative of his early life under the title of From forecastle to cabin.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), South sea expedition. (search)
as approved, and in December, 1836, a scientific corps was appointed, to receive pay from July 4, 1837. It was to be commanded by Capt. Ap Catesby Jones, of the United States navy. An expedition was organized, but, serious disputes arising, it was disbanded. Another was organized, and its command was intrusted to Lieut. Charles Wilkes, of the navy. The scientific corps consisted of nine members—namely, H. Hale, philologist; C. Pickering and T. R. Peale, naturalists; The Sayre House, Southampton. J. Couthong, conchologist; J. D. Dana, mineralogist; W. Rich, botanist; J. Drayton and A. T. Agate, draughtsmen; Mr. Brackenridge, horticulturist. The squadron consisted of the frigates Vincennes and Peacock, and the brig Porpoise and schooners Flying-fish and Sea-horse as tenders, with the store-ship Relief. It sailed from Hampton Roads Aug. 18, 1838, and on Jan. 26, 1839, was anchored opposite the mouth of the Rio Negro, Patagonia. The squadron, after touching at various groups of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
s of the Indians part of Long Island for the company......1639 Thomas Belcher takes up a tract (in Brooklyn)......1639 Lion Gardiner purchases Gardiner's Island (the first permanent English settlement in the State)......March 10, 1640 Southampton, Long Island, settled by the English......1640 Rensselaerwyck rapidly increases in wealth and population......1640 Indians near Manhattan alienated by the conduct of the Dutch......1640 Expedition against the Raritan Indians......July The exports are provisions, furs, tar, and lumber. The imports of English manufactures amount to £ 50,000 yearly. The customs, excises, and quit-rents do not nearly suffice for the public expenses. The chief trading-places are New York and Southampton on Long Island for foreign commerce, and Albany for Indian traffic. There are about 2,000 males able to bear arms, 140 of them horsemen. Fort James at New York is a square of stone with four bastions, mounting forty-six guns; Fort Albany at
7-8. 2. Thomas, s. of Nicholas (1), m. Mary, dau. of Henry Withington (Ruling Elder) of Dorchester, 23 Feb. 1643-1, and had Sarah, b. 16 Ap. 1645, d. 29 Oct. 1645; Sarah, b. 11 Nov. 1646, m. Rev. Joseph Whiting of Lynn, and afterwards of Southampton, L. I., and d. before 1699; Mary, b. 20 Ap. 1649, d. 29 Ap. 1649; Mary, b. 28 July 1650, m. Solomon Phipps of Chs. July 1669, and Maj. Thomas Brown of Sudbury, 1 Mar. 1703-4, and was living as his widow in 1725; Samuel, b. Oct. 1652, grad. H. C. nt of Harvard Colledg about 40 years. According to the Town Records he d. 7 Sept. 1683. His w. Katherine d. between 21 Sept. and 7 Nov. 1685. 2. Joseph, s. of John (1), grad. H. C. 1669, was fellow of the College 1673, was ordained at Southampton, L. I., Mar. 1680, and d. 4 Ap. 1682, a. about 31. He left sons John, grad. H. C. 1699, styled of Southampton, gent. in 1700; and Joseph, a tailor, who was of Southampton 1702. They sold in 1702 the homestead, formerly of their grandfather, to
n England in 1629. Their children, all born in England, were Elizabeth, b. 1619, n. Andrew Belcher. and d. 26 Oct. 1680, a. 61; Thomas, b. 1622; Anna, b. prob. 1624, m. Matthew Bridge, and d. 2 Dec. 1704; Samuel, b. 1626; Jonathan, b. 29 Feb. 1627-8. 2. Thomas, s. of Nicholas (1), m. Mary, dau. of Henry Withington (Ruling Elder) of Dorchester, 23 Feb. 1643-1, and had Sarah, b. 16 Ap. 1645, d. 29 Oct. 1645; Sarah, b. 11 Nov. 1646, m. Rev. Joseph Whiting of Lynn, and afterwards of Southampton, L. I., and d. before 1699; Mary, b. 20 Ap. 1649, d. 29 Ap. 1649; Mary, b. 28 July 1650, m. Solomon Phipps of Chs. July 1669, and Maj. Thomas Brown of Sudbury, 1 Mar. 1703-4, and was living as his widow in 1725; Samuel, b. Oct. 1652, grad. H. C. 1671, and d. unm. in England 22 Dec. 1676, of small-pox; Thomas, b. 16 Dec. 1654, d. young; Jonathan, b. 27 Feb. 1656-7, d. 20 Ap. 1657; Jonathan, b. 10 Feb. 1658-9, grad. H. C. 1679, d. unm. of consumption, 13 Nov. 1682; Joseph, b. 18 Sept. 1661,
ation. His epitaph, now somewhat mutilated, bears testimony to his worth: Here lyes the body of John Taylor, aged 73 years, deceased September 6th. 1683. He was a useful man in his generation, a lover of piety, a lover of learning, a faithful servant of Harvard Colledg about 40 years. According to the Town Records he d. 7 Sept. 1683. His w. Katherine d. between 21 Sept. and 7 Nov. 1685. 2. Joseph, s. of John (1), grad. H. C. 1669, was fellow of the College 1673, was ordained at Southampton, L. I., Mar. 1680, and d. 4 Ap. 1682, a. about 31. He left sons John, grad. H. C. 1699, styled of Southampton, gent. in 1700; and Joseph, a tailor, who was of Southampton 1702. They sold in 1702 the homestead, formerly of their grandfather, to Francis Foxcroft; it contained three acres, and was on the southeasterly side of Kirkland Street. James, by w. Sarah, had William, b. 21 Aug. 1676. Ann, m. William Clemance 3 Ap. 1660. Thatcher, Samuel, by w. Hannah, had Hannah, b. 9 Oct. 164
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
hound complied with his request, and heading for the Alabama, which was now going down rapidly, she picked up forty-two persons, among whom were Semmes and fourteen other officers; then, gradually edging off, she steamed across the channel to Southampton. Winslow's officers implored him to throw a shell at the Deerhound, when it was found that she was making off, but he refused; and very properly, as her participation in the affair was due to his own suggestion. In making this suggestion, it The engagement lasted an hour, and in twenty minutes after the last shot was fired the Alabama sank out of sight. The number of casualties on board the defeated cruiser was not far from forty. Semmes allows thirty in his report, written at Southampton two days after the action; but owing to his hasty departure, and his separation from the rest of his crew, he could not well have known the whole number. Of the seventy prisoners taken by the Kearsarge, three were in a dying condition, and s
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