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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 22: campaign of the Carolinas. February and March, 1866. (search)
not returned. I was absent from here when they left. Just returned yesterday morning from Cape Fear River. I went there to determine where Schofield's corps had better go to operate against Wilmington and Goldsboroa. The instructions with this will inform you of the conclusion arrived at. Schofield was with me, and the plan of the movement against Wilmington fully determined before we started back; hence the absence of more detailed instructions to him. He will land one division at Smithville, and move rapidly up the south side of the river, and secure the Wilmington & Charlotte Railroad, and with his pontoon train cross over to the island south of the city, if he can. With the aid of the gunboats, there is no doubt but this move will drive the enemy from their position eight miles east of the city, either back to their line or away altogether. There will be a large force on the north bank of Cape Fear River, ready to follow up and invest the garrison, if they should go inside
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 25 (search)
of Mrs. Pettigru. I doubt whether any city was ever more terribly punished than Charleston, but, as her people had for years been agitating for war and discord, and had finally inaugurated the civil war by an attack on the small and devoted garrison of Major Anderson, sent there by the General Government to defend them, the judgment of the world will be, that Charleston deserved the fate that befell her. Resuming our voyage, we passed into Cape Fear River by its mouth at Fort Caswell and Smithville, and out by the new channel at Fort Fisher, and reached Morehead City on the 4th of May. We found there the revenue-cutter Wayanda, on board of which were the Chief-Justice, Mr. Chase, and his daughter Nettie, now Mrs. Hoyt. The Chief-Justice at that moment was absent on a visit to Newbern, but came back the next day. Meantime, by means of the telegraph, I was again in correspondence with General Schofield at Raleigh. He had made great progress in parolling the officers and men of Johns
ain object was to capture General Herbert, the rebel General commanding this department, and whose headquarters were at Smithville, a small village up the river, and inside all the forts. We supposed there were about three regiments of rebels at thirictest silence was observed. Saw plenty of fires from salt-works, as we were pulling up the river. At last we passed Smithville, and returned to the village; could hear voices of workmen at the salt-works on the bank distinctly; pulled in; landed surely have had him. Had not the Adjutant-General escaped, we would have paid a quiet visit to several other houses in Smithville, and also intended to spike a four-gun battery which lay very handy to that vicinity. Next morning I went over in chself, and at once made known the object of the flag of truce, etc. I was obliged to wait there until they could send to Smithville for Captain Kelley's clothes, etc., etc. At first Colonel Jones was very reserved in his manner, and of course I was on
ur on that, and so on all round, and it is easy to see that the ordnance is of the most formidable character. From a flag-staff on one of the angles of the fort, floats the confederate flag; from a flag-staff on the opposite angle floats the palmetto flag. Passing now to the left hand side of the harbor, on James Island, we first have the Wappoo battery, near Wappoo Creek, effectually commanding the embouchure of Ashley River and the left side of the city. Next, coming down, we have Fort Johnston, and between it and Castle Pinckney, on an artificial island raised by the rebels, on the middle ground, is Fort Ripley. Coming down to Cumming's Point, directly opposite Moultrie, is the Cumming's Point battery, named by the rebels Battery Bee, after the general of that name; south of Battery Bee, on Morris Island, is Fort Wagner, a very extensive sand battery of the most powerful construction. Half-way down Morris Island, again, from Fort Wagner, is a new sandwork erected by the rebe
tered the harbor at Wilmington by Cape Fear River, (not by the new inlet, as before stated,) and got aground inside of Fort Caswell, having on board sixty thousand stand of arms, and forty tons of powder. They sent steamers from Wilmington and Smithville to lighten her, and succeeded in getting her off on the twenty-sixth, when she proceeded to Smithville, where she took in two lighter-loads of cotton, and ran the blockade out of the harbor on the thirtieth of April, and went to sea. --Boston T Wilmington by Cape Fear River, (not by the new inlet, as before stated,) and got aground inside of Fort Caswell, having on board sixty thousand stand of arms, and forty tons of powder. They sent steamers from Wilmington and Smithville to lighten her, and succeeded in getting her off on the twenty-sixth, when she proceeded to Smithville, where she took in two lighter-loads of cotton, and ran the blockade out of the harbor on the thirtieth of April, and went to sea. --Boston Traveller, May 12.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Defence of Charleston from July 1st to July 10th, 1864. (search)
o enable them to seize the important work, Fort Johnston. At the same time a column was to move uparges, from Morris' island, made a dash at Fort Johnston. They were handsomely and thoroughly repus on James' island, and he also reinforced Fort Johnston with a small detachment. Very respectfuI had to make drafts upon the garrisons at Fort Johnston, and batteries Haskell, Tatum, &c., which, one hundred (100) men were withdrawn from Fort Johnston. It is to be observed that troops had bh the important post and harbor defence of Fort Johnston. One column landed its men near our end ofher and larger between Battery Simkins and Fort Johnston, which post was, simultaneously with Shellas not designed to draw our attention from Fort Johnston, or for some sudden attack upon our lines,made another barge attack upon Simkins and Fort Johnston, which was met by the same gallant garrisoistrict embracing the several batteries of Fort Johnston, under Lieutenant-Colonel Yates, Haskell,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Defence and fall of Fort Fisher. (search)
them there. This order, however, was rescinded on General Whiting's appeal, and he was allowed to keep the whole. With this garrison I considered the fort perfectly safe and capable of standing any length of siege. I am at a loss to know what day the General refers to. No reinforcements came from him on Saturday, the 14th, but during the day, Sunday, the 15th, Colonel Graham arrived at Battery Buchanan with his brigade. He did not land all of them, but telegraphed General Bragg from Smithville at 1 o'clock P. M.: As instructed by you about four hundred of my men landed at Fisher. The rest were prevented by the fire of the enemy. I will go there to night unless otherwise instructed. About three hundred and fifty of these men reported to me just previous to the assault, and they were all of the one thousand of Bragg's best men, whom he started for the fort, who got there. General Bragg is not accurate. Up to the arrival of the three hundred and fifty South Carolinians I had b
nd grief, we gave her to the flames. The Story of the Confederate Ship Virginia, by William Norris, Colonel Signal Corps, Confederate Army. At Wilmington, North Carolina, the Southwest bar was defended by Fort Caswell, and New Inlet bar by Fort Fisher. The naval defenses consisted of two ironclads, the North Carolina and the Raleigh. The former could not cross any of the bars in consequence of her draught of water. Her steam-power hardly gave propulsion. She sank during the war off Smithville. The Raleigh's services were almost valueless in consequence of her deep draught and her feeble steam-power. She made one futile trip out of New Inlet, and after a few hours attempted to return, but was wrecked upon the bar. The brave and invincible defense of Fort Sumter gave to the city of Charleston, South Carolina, additional lustre. For four years that fort, located in its harbor, defied the army and navy of the United States. When the city was about to be abandoned to the army
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
etire......Jan. 9, 1861 Ordinance of secession of Mississippi adopted in convention, 84 to 15......Jan. 9, 1861 Fort Johnston seized by citizens of Smithville, N. C.......Jan. 9, 1861 Fort Caswell seized by citizens of Smithville and WilminSmithville, N. C.......Jan. 9, 1861 Fort Caswell seized by citizens of Smithville and Wilmington, N. C.......Jan. 10, 1861 Ordinance of secession of Florida adopted in convention, 62 to 7......Jan. 10, 1861 United States arsenal and barracks at Baton Rouge, La., seized by Louisiana State troops......Jan. 10, 1861 Fort Jackson and Smithville and Wilmington, N. C.......Jan. 10, 1861 Ordinance of secession of Florida adopted in convention, 62 to 7......Jan. 10, 1861 United States arsenal and barracks at Baton Rouge, La., seized by Louisiana State troops......Jan. 10, 1861 Fort Jackson and Fort Philips, below New Orleans, seized by Louisiana State troops......Jan. 11, 1861 Ordinance of secession of Alabama adopted in convention, 61 to 39......Jan. 11, 1861 Florida demands the surrender of Fort Pickens, at the entrance of Pensacolrolina refuses to furnish quota of militia (two regiments) to the United States......April 15, 1861 Forts Caswell and Johnston, of North Carolina, taken possession of by State troops......April 16, 1861 Ordinance of secession of Virginia, adopt
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Carolina, (search)
34′, and extending from the Atlantic to the Pacific......1743 War having been declared by England against France, Fort Johnston on the south bank of Cape Fear is built......1745 Large accession to the settlement near Cross Creek is made by Sc fortunes to secure her freedom and safety, adopted by the Cumberland Association at Wilmington......June 19, 1775 Fort Johnston burned by militia under Colonel Ashe......July 18, 1775 Governor Martin issues a proclamation from the British shind opened at Trinity College......1852 James C. Dobbin, Secretary of the Navy......March 7, 1853 Forts Caswell and Johnston, occupied by State troops unauthorized, Jan. 8, 1861, are ordered restored to the proper authorities by Governor Ellis..nited States Secretary of War, says: You can get no troops from North Carolina ......April 15, 1861 Forts Caswell and Johnston seized by Confederates......April 16, 1861 United States branch mint at Charlotte seized by State......April 20, 1861
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