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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Kentucky Volunteers. (search)
e-joy Station September 2-6. Operations in North Georgia and North Alabama against Hood September 29-November 3. Moved to Nashville, thence to Pulaski, Tenn. Nashville Campaign November-December. Columbia, Duck River, November 24-27. Columbia Ford November 29. Battle of Franklin November 30. Battle of Nashville December 15-16. Pursuit of Hood to the Tennessee River December 17-28. At Clifton, Tenn., till January 15, 1865. Moved to Washington, D. C., thence to Smithville, N. C., January 15-February 9. Operations against Hoke February 12-14. Near Smithville February 16. Fort Anderson February 18-19. Town Creek February 19-20. Eagle Island February 21. Capture of Wilmington February 22. Campaign of the Carolinas March 1-April 26. Advance on Goldsboro, N. C., March 6-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 21. Advance on Raleigh April 10-13. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his a
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Massachusetts Volunteers. (search)
ached to 1st Brigade, 1st Division, District of Beaufort, N. C., Dept. of North Carolina, March, 1865, and ordered to the field March 3. Expedition to Kinston, N. C., March 3-14. Southwest Creek March 7. Battle of Wise's Forks March 8-10. Occupation of Kinston March 14. Provost duty at Kinston till June.) Regiment concentrated at New Berne June, 1865, and assigned to duty at Wilmington and in the Defenses of Cape Fear River, including Forts Fisher and Caswell, and duty at Smithville till September. Moved to Boston September 2-16. Mustered out September 23, 1865. Regiment lost during service 15 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 4 Officers and 363 Enlisted men by disease. Total 382. 3rd Massachusetts Regiment Heavy Artillery Organized for one year August, 1864, by consolidation of 3rd, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th and 16th Unattached Companies Heavy Artillery. Attached to 2nd Brigade, Hardin's Division, 22nd Army C
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
er 28-30. Charles City Cross Roads October 1. Darbytown and New Market Roads October 7. Darbytown Road October 13. Fair Oaks October 27-28. In trenches north of the James River till January, 1865. 2nd Expedition to Fort Fisher, N. C., January 4-15, 1865. Assault and capture of Fort Fisher January 15. Cape Fear Intrenchments February 11-13. Fort Anderson February 18-20. Capture of Wilmington February 22. Near Wilmington February 22-23. Duty at Wilmington, Smithville and Goldsburg, N. C., till July. Regiment concentrated at Washington, D. C., July, and duty there till August. Mustered out August 21, 1865. Regiment lost during service 42 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 284 Enlisted men by disease. Total 328. Anthon's Battalion Light Artillery Organization not completed. The several Companies serving at Fort Columbus, New York Harbor, consolidated to two and designated the 20th and 28th New York Independent Ba
st 31-September 1. Lovejoy Station September 2-6. Camp at Decatur till October 4. Pursuit of Hood into Alabama October 4-26. Nashville Campaign November-December. Columbia, Duck River, November 24-27. Columbia Ford November 28-29. Battle of Franklin November 30. Battle of Nashville December 15-16. Pursuit of Hood to the Tennessee River December 17-28. Moved to Clifton, Tenn., and duty there till January 16, 1865. Movement to Washington, D. C., thence to Smithville, N. C., January 16-February 10. Operations against Hoke February 12-14. Fort Anderson February 18-19. Town Creek February 19-20. Capture of Wilmington February 22. Campaign of the Carolinas March 1-April 26. Advance on Goldsboro, N. C., March 6-21. Occupation of Goldsboro and Raleigh. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. Duty at Raleigh till May 5, and Greensboro and Salisbury till June. Mustered out June 26, 1865. Regiment lost durin
e mouth of Cape Fear river on the ninth of February, and landed upon the peninsula near Fort Fisher. Major-General A. H. Terry, with about eight thousand men, then held a line across the peninsula about two miles above the fort, and occupied Smithville and Fort Caswell on the south side of the river, while the naval squadron, under Rear-Admiral Porter, occupied positions in Cape Fear river and off the coast, covering the flanks of General Terry's line. The enemy occupied Fort Anderson, on nce, after a hard night's work, the attempt was abandoned, and I turned attention to the enemy's right, where I would not have to contend with the difficulties of both land and sea. General Cox's and General Ames' divisions were crossed over to Smithville, where they were joined by Colonel Moore's brigade of General Couch's division, which had just debarked, and advanced along the main Wilmington road, until they encountered the enemy's position at Fort Anderson and adjacent works. Here two bri
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 54. the capture of Fort Fisher. (search)
ing it; but if such was his intention he abandoned it after a skirmish with our pickets. During the day Brevet Brigadier-General H. L. Abbott, Chief of Artillery, was busily engaged in landing artillery and ammunition, so that if the assault failed, siege operations might at once be commenced. Consequent to the fall of Fisher, the enemy, during the nights of the sixteenth and seventeenth, blew up Fort Caswell, and abandoned both it and their very extensive works on Smith's island, at Smithville and Reeve's Point, thus placing in our hands all the works erected to defend the mouth of the Cape Fear river. In all the works were found one hundred and sixty-nine pieces of artillery, nearly all of which are heavy; over two thousand stands of small arms; considerable quantities of commissary stores, and full supplies of ammunition. Our prisoners numbered one hundred and twelve commissioned officers and one thousand nine hundred and seventy-one enlisted men. I have no words to do
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments., Second regiment Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. (search)
embers of Cos. G and H, stationed at Plymouth under captains Ira B. Sampson and Joseph R. Fiske, were taken prisoners in the engagement, April 17-20, and the survivors, 35, were released and joined the regiment in the early part of 1865. In May, 1864, headquarters were changed to New Berne, N. C., and in August 375 recruits were added to the regiment, more than filling its ranks, the surplus men being transferred to the 17th Mass. Infantry. In the autumn the organization lost many men by disease during the yellow-fever epidemic in New Berne and vicinity. In March, 1865, five companies, under Lieutenant Colonel Sprague, took part in the engagement in the vicinity of Kinston, N. C., and were for a time on guard at Kinston. In June the regiment was for a time united at New Berne and remained there until July, then served in detachments at Wilmington, N. C., Smithville and Fort Fisher; on Sept. 15, 1865, it returned to Massachusetts, and was mustered out and discharged Sept. 23, 1865.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments., Thirty-third regiment Massachusetts Infantry. (search)
ring of 1864, forming part of the 20th Corps, Army of the Cumberland, the regiment was engaged at Resaca, Ga., making a series of charges, and was detailed as division train guard during the siege of Atlanta, and afterwards served as provost guard in the city under Maj. Elisha Doane. It shared in Sherman's march to the sea, and entered Savannah December 21, where it remained until the close of the year. Encamping in South Carolina in January, 1865, it began the march northward January 29, and took part at Averysboroa, N. C., March 16, and at Bentonville on the 19th. It went into camp near Goldsboroa, N. C., March 24, and moved on April 10 toward Raleigh, receiving at Smithville the news of Lee's surrender. Encamping near Raleigh until April 30, it moved then to the vicinity of Richmond and on toward Washington, reaching Alexandria May 19. It was mustered out of service to date June 11, 1865, and reaching Massachusetts June 3, was paid off and discharged at Readville July 2, 1865.
two-thirds of the entire coast line. Here and there this bulwark of sand is broken by inlets, a few of which allow safe passage from the Atlantic, always dangerous off this coast, to the smooth waters of the sound. The necessity of seizing and holding these inlets, controlling as they did such extensive and important territory, was at once seen by the State authorities. So, immediately after the ordinance of secession was passed, Governor Ellis ordered the seizure of Fort Caswell, near Smithville, and of Fort Macon, near Morehead City. These were strengthened as far as the condition of the State's embryonic armories allowed. Defenses were begun at Ocracoke inlet, at Hatteras inlet, and on Roanoke island. Though these works were dignified by the name of forts, they were pitifully inadequate to the tasks assigned them. The one at Ocracoke was called Fort Morgan, and the two at Hatteras respectively Fort Hatteras and Fort Clark. When the State became a member of the Confederacy,
erson, J. W. Hinsdale and Charles M. Hall—all under General Baker. At Fort Caswell, the First North Carolina battalion, Col. T. M. Jones; the Third North Carolina battalion, Capt. J. G. Moore, and the Sampson artillery were stationed. At Fort Campbell there were three companies of North Carolina troops under Lieut. J. D. Taylor. Fort Holmes was garrisoned by eight companies of the Fortieth regiment and one company of the Third battalion; that post was commanded by Col. J. J. Hedrick. At Smithville, a post of which Maj. James Reilly had been the commander, two companies of the Tenth North Carolina battalion and one light battery constituted the garrison. At Magnolia there was a small post under Col. George Jackson Parts of all these garrisons joined Johnston's army. The union of all these forces would give General Johnston an effective strength of only about 36,000. A larger number than this is reported on the parole list of the surrender, but this comes from the fact that many
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