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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
2,907.50; in 1865, $2,150.00. Total amount, $10,525.37. The ladies of Westford all through the war were active in their efforts and liberal in their contributions for the soldiers in the ranks, and for the sick and wounded in the hospitals. Weston Incorporated Jan. 1, 1712. Population in 1860, 1,243; in 1865, 1,231. Valuation in 1860, $1,016,605; in 1865, $1,103,274. The selectmen in 1861 were Benjamin Pierce, Jr., Alonzo S. Fiske, Increase Leadbetter, Jr.; in 1862, Alonzo S. Fiskor the purpose of crushing the Rebellion, until the quota required of this town (17) shall be furnished, the bounties to be paid when the men were mustered into the service and credited. August 2d, Voted, to give each volunteer, to the number of Weston's quota, an additional hundred dollars who shall enlist within ten days; also to give each volunteer ten dollars for each individual he may induce to join the military service as part of this town's quota. August 19th, Voted, to give a bounty of
wn up in line under command of General Artemas Ward, who read Washington's commission to the assembled multitude, and made proclamation of the same to the army. Washington then advanced a few paces, made a brief address, drew his sword, and assumed the command, which he held until the treaty of peace was signed, and the independence of the United States acknowledged by England. In October, 1789, Washington, then President of the United States, made his last tour through New England. At Weston, October 23, he was met by a company of horse from Cambridge, and escorted to this Common. On arrival, he was saluted with salvos of artillery under charge of General Brooks, who met him at the head of about one thousand militia. Soon after, he left the Common, and proceeded to Harvard Hall, to meet the officers of the college, who had assembled to receive him. One hundred years ago, the college Commencement was the great holiday of the State, and large numbers from the surrounding town
lion two hundred thousand pounds of crude rubber and cotton and woolen cloths and other materials to the value of one million dollars are used annually. The company state that among the advantages found from being located in Cambridge are excellent freight facilities, nearness to the Boston market, and the ease with which they can find workmen when needed. A. H. Hews & Co. own the oldest existing pottery in the United States, located in North Cambridge. The business was founded at Weston, in 1765, by the grandfather of the present senior member of the firm of A. H. Hews & Co. On the fly-leaf of the journal of the founder of the business is written Abraham Hews's book, Weston. The first entry was made on the day of the battle of Lexington:— April 19, 1775. Lemuel Jones, to ware, Dr.028 Isaac Flagg, to ware, Dr.027 April 29, 1775. Isaac Jones, to ware, Dr.020 Nathan Darkhurs, to ware, Dr.020 June 19, 1793. David Brackett, to my horse to Framingham, 1
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. S. Russell. (search)
To Mrs. S. S. Russell. Wayland, September 23, 1880. My precious friend,--I have not answered your last kind letter as soon as my heart dictated, because I have waited in hopes to give a better account of myself. ... At last, by the help of my friend Mrs. S., I have found a pleasant old doctor in Weston who has made rheumatism his specialty and been very successful in curing it. He is very positive that a cure will be effected in two or three weeks. Mrs.-- has been very kind and efficient, and the neighbors very attentive. It is a great blessing, also, that my general health has been and is extremely good .. Some of my poor neighbors have been in trouble owing to protracted illness, and I shall make up to them the days when they have not been able to work. The worthy young man who comes here to sleep needs some help about learning a trade, and I am going to give him a lift. Divers other projects I have in my mind, and I expect to accomplish them all by the help of Aladdin's
company come this day to Quaboag, about sundown, not long before nor after. Coll. Mass. Hist. Soc., XXXI. 102. The easterly section of this road is mentioned by Pemberton, under date of Sept. 30, 1783, in his manuscript Chronology, preserved in the library of the Mass. Hist. Society: A gentleman of this State remarks, that soon after the settlement of our Fathers at Boston, the persons appointed to explore the country, and lay out public roads did it as far as the bank by Mrs. Biglow in Weston, and reported that they had done it as far as they believed would ever be necessary, it being about seven miles from the College in Cambridge. It is proper to add, that I have never seen any contemporary authority for this extraordinary statement. Col. Shute, the newly appointed Governor of Massachusetts and New Hampshire, arrived in Boston, Oct. 4, 1716, and on the 15th day of the same month commenced a journey to New Hampshire. Instead of crossing the ferry to Charlestown, he passed
on, to be paid in new emission at one for forty. Under this new state of things Master Kendall's salary was fixed at thirty pounds and his board, as appears by a vote of the Selectmen, April 7, 1783, to engage with Mr. Asa Packard to keep the Grammar School in this town for three months, to commence on Thursday next, Mr. Samuel Kendall closed his three years service April 10, 1783, having taught the Grammar School more than two years before he graduated at H. C. 1782. He was ordained at Weston Nov. 5, 1783, where he died Feb. 16, 1814. He received the degree of D. D. from Yale College, 1806. at the rate of thirty pounds per annum, and his board to be found for him, it being upon the same terms that Mr. Kendall kept it. Fifty years later, it appears by the Report of the Auditing Committee, April 19, 1833, that the salary of the schoolmasters (of whom there were then five) was five hundred and fifty dollars,—each providing his own board; since which time the amount of salary has b
Ann, b. 22 Oct. 1815; Andrew, b. 8 May 1817; Edward, b. 17 Dec. 1819. Isaac the f. grad. II. C. 1798, was a lawyer in Weston, Register of Probate in Middlesex from 1817 to 1851, res. alternately at Weston and Cambridge, and d. 11 Mar. 1861. 6.Weston and Cambridge, and d. 11 Mar. 1861. 6. Nathan, s. of Samuel of Waltham, a descendant from John of Watertown, b. 6 Dec. 1780 (according to the family record, or 1779, as Bond records it), settled early in Camb., m. Anna Livermore, dau. of Josiah Mason, 13 July 1805, and had Clementina, b. dau. of John Palfrey, 30 May 1689, and had Nathaniel, b. 19 Aug. 1692, m. Mary, dau. of Deac. Samuel Cooper, removed to Weston, and d. without issue about 1770; Benjamin, 1. 26 Aug. 1696;, d. 29 Dec. 1702; Elizabeth. b. 24 Aug. 1699; Martha, b. 12 and d. 23 Oct. 1723; all, except the last three, living in 1742, at the date of their father's will. His w. Lydia d. at Weston 18 Ap. 1740, and he m. Hannah——, who survived him. Jonathan the f. was a husbandman, and inherited the homestead, which h
19 Sept. 1805, H. C. 1825, a lawyer in Boston, d. 22 Mar. 1864; Isaac Lamson, b. 18 Mar. 1810; George, b. 19 Nov. 1813; Susan Ann, b. 22 Oct. 1815; Andrew, b. 8 May 1817; Edward, b. 17 Dec. 1819. Isaac the f. grad. II. C. 1798, was a lawyer in Weston, Register of Probate in Middlesex from 1817 to 1851, res. alternately at Weston and Cambridge, and d. 11 Mar. 1861. 6. Nathan, s. of Samuel of Waltham, a descendant from John of Watertown, b. 6 Dec. 1780 (according to the family record, or 177Weston and Cambridge, and d. 11 Mar. 1861. 6. Nathan, s. of Samuel of Waltham, a descendant from John of Watertown, b. 6 Dec. 1780 (according to the family record, or 1779, as Bond records it), settled early in Camb., m. Anna Livermore, dau. of Josiah Mason, 13 July 1805, and had Clementina, b. 12 Aug. 1805, d. young; Frederick William, b. Nov. 1806, d. young,; Sarah Russell Mason, b. 16 Dec. 1808, m. James Munroe, Jr , 8 Oct. 1834; Elijah, b. 1 Feb. 1811, m. Charlotte D. Endicott 5 Oct. 1837, a merchant in New York, where he d. 4 Dec. 1859; Mary Lois, b. 1 May 1813, m. Alexander H. Ramsay 8 Ap. 1835; Margaret, b. 1 April 1815, m. David Humphrey 15 Nov. 1837; Be
and d. 9 Felt. 1754. Goddard Gen., pp. 8-10; Bond's Hist. Wat., pp. 237, 238. 3. Benjamin, s. of William (2), m. Martha, dau. of John Palfrey, 30 May 1689, and had Nathaniel, b. 19 Aug. 1692, m. Mary, dau. of Deac. Samuel Cooper, removed to Weston, and d. without issue about 1770; Benjamin, 1. 26 Aug. 1696;, d. 29 Dec. 1702; Elizabeth. b. 24 Aug. 1699; Martha, b. 12 Aug. 1702, m. Walter Cooper 7 ,June 1722. and d. 10 Ap. 1768; Benjamin, b. 8 Aug. 1705, was a carpenter, m. Mary, dau. of Sa8, m. Thomas Goddard 3 Jan. 1738-9; Sarah, b. Dec. 1720, d. 21 Jan. 1720-21; Jonathan, b. and d. 16 Feb. 1721-2; Jonathan, b. and d. 23 Oct. 1723; all, except the last three, living in 1742, at the date of their father's will. His w. Lydia d. at Weston 18 Ap. 1740, and he m. Hannah——, who survived him. Jonathan the f. was a husbandman, and inherited the homestead, which he sold in 1706, and subsequently owned and probably occupied a lot of two acres on the S. W. side of North Avenue, at its ang
s and enlisted men during the late civil war from Salem, Mass. Salem, 1877. 8°. Southborough. Appleton, Samuel. Address at the dedication of the soldiers' monument, Southborough, Mass., Jan. 1, 1867. — A record of the soldiers of Southborough during the rebellion from 1861 to 1866, with extracts from public documents, etc. Marlborough, 1867. 8°. Wayland. The town of Wayland in the civil war of 1861-65. Wayland, 1871. 4°. Weston. Reception of the returned soldiers of Weston, Mass., and memorial service in honor of the fallen, Aug. 22, 1865. Waltham, 1865. 8°. West Roxbury. Clarke, J. F. The heroes of one country town. An address delivered to the people of West Roxbury, Mass., on the dedication of a monument to the soldiers of that town. (In his memorial and biographical sketches, 1878.) 383-402 pp. 16°. Worcester. Marvin, Abijah P. History of Worcester in the war of the rebellion. Worcester, 1870. 8°. — County record and military roll of hono
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