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May 1. The story of an armistice having been requested by Secretary Cameron was denied as follows: Washington, Wednesday, May 1. Simeon Draper, Esq., Chairman Union Defence Committee: There is not a word of truth in any of the newspaper reports of the armistice made or proposed. That sort of business ended on the 4th of March. F. W. Seward. --N. Y. Times, May 2. A large and enthusiastic meeting of the citizens of Wiscasset, Maine, was held, Wilmot Wood, Esq., presiding. Some spirited resolutions were unanimously passed; and it was recommended to the town to raise $5,000 for the support of families of volunteers who, under the command of Edwin M. Smith, Esq., were enrolled in a company for the defence of the Union.--Boston Transcript, May 7. The Baptist State Convention of Georgia, submitted a communication to the Congress of the seceded States at Montgomery, endorsing, approving, and avowing support to, the Confederate Government, and requesting the sa
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 7: sea-coast defences..—Brief description of our maritime fortifications, with an Examination of the several Contests that have taken place between ships and forts, including the attack on San Juan d'ulloa, and on St. Jean d'acre (search)
int out, in very general terms, the positions and character of these works, mentioning only such as have been completed, or are now in course of construction, and such as are intended to be built as soon as Congress shall grant the requisite funds. There are other works projected for some future period, but as they do not belong to the class required for immediate use, they will not be referred to. Maine. Beginning at the northeastern extremity of our coast, we have, for Eastport and Wiscasset, projected works estimated to carry about fifty guns. Nothing has yet been done to these works. Next Portland, with works carrying about forty or fifty guns, and Fort Penobscot and batteries, carrying about one hundred and fifty guns. These are only partly built. New Hampshire. Defenses of Portsmouth and the vicinity, about two hundred guns. These works are also only partly built. Massachusetts. Projected works east of Boston, carrying about sixty guns These are not yet com
s. The regiment is accompanied by Major-General Titcomb and staff. The following are the principal officers:-- H. G. Berry, Colonel; T. H. Marshall, Lieutenant-Colonel; F. S. Nickerson; Major, J. B. Greenhalgh, Adjutant; Isaac Abbott, Quartermaster; Wm. A. Banks, Surgeon; Elisha Hopkins, Assistant Surgeon; B. A. Chase, Chaplain; S. H. Chapman, Sergeant-Major; John H. Crowell, Quartermaster-Sergeant; Julius S. Clark, Commissary-Sergeant; Chas. S. McCobb, Hospital Steward. Companies and Captains. Co. A--(Belfast).--Captain, H. W. Cunningham. Co. B--(Rockland).--Captain, Elijah Walker. Co. C--(Rockland).--Captain, O. J. Conant. Co. D--(Rockland).--Captain, L. D. Carver. Co. E--(Damariscotta).--Captain, S. C. Whitehouse. Co. F--(Brooks).--Captain, A. B. Beane. Co. I--(Wiscasset).--Captain, Edwin M. Smith. Co. H--(Rockland).--Captain, J. G. Burns. Co. I--(Searsport).--Captain, Eben Whitcomb. Co. K--(Belfast City Greys).--Captain, S. M. Fuller. New York Evening Post, June 19.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Custom-house, (search)
District of Columbia—Georgetown. Florida—Appalachicola, Cedar Keys, Fernandina, Jacksonville, Key West, Pensacola, St. Augustine, Tampa. Georgia—Atlanta, Brunswick, St. Mary's, Savannah. Illinois—Chicago, Galena. Indiana—Evansville, Indianapolis, Michigan City. Iowa—Burlington. Dubuque. Kentucky—Louisville, Paducah. Loulsiana—Brashear, New Orleans. Maine—Bangor, Bath, Belfast, Castine, Eastport, Ellsworth, Houlton, Kennebunk, Machias, Portland, Saco, Waldoborough, Wiscasset, York. Maryland—Annanolis, Baltimore. Crisfield. Massachusetts—Barnstable, Boston, Edgarton, Fall River, Gloucester, Marblehead, Nantucket, New Bedford, Newburyport, Plymouth. Salem. Michigan—Detroit, Grand Haven, Grand Rapids. Marquette, Port Huron. Minnesota—Duluth, St. Paul. Mississippi—Natchez, Shieldsborough, Vicksburg. Missouri—Kansas City, St. Joseph, St. Louis. Montana—Fort Benton. Nebraska—Omaha. New Hampshire—Portsmouth.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dean, John Ward, 1815- (search)
Dean, John Ward, 1815- Historian; born in Wiscasset, Me., March 13, 1815; became librarian of the New England Historical Genealogical Society, and edited 9 volumes of its Register. He has also written Memoir of Rev. Nathaniel Ward; Michael Wigglesworth; Story of the embarkation of Cromwell and his friends for New England, etc.
reaty of 1725 made with Indians at Falmouth by commission from Massachusetts......Oct. 16, 1749 Indians attack Fort Richmond, on the Kennebec, but, hearing that the garrison had been reinforced, they retire, but attack Dresden, Swain Island, Wiscasset, Sheepscot, and Georgetown, and withdraw with twenty or thirty captives......Sept. 11-25, 1750 Commissioners meet the Indians at St. George's Fort, Aug. 3, and proclaim a cessation of hostilities......Sept. 3, 1751 New Castle incorporateduseag, a precinct of Georgetown, the birthplace of Sir William Phipps, first royal governor of the Massachusetts provinces, erected into a town by the name of Woolwich......Oct. 20, 1759 Pownalborough, embracing the present towns of Dresden, Wiscasset, Alna, and Swan Island, is incorporated......Feb. 13, 1760 Peace made with the remnant of the Indian tribes in the vicinity of Fort Pownal......April 29, 1760 General court establishes the counties of Cumberland (that part of Maine betw
veteran printer and editor of the New Hampshire Sentinel at Keene, N. H., where he d. 6 June 1873; Henry, b. 10 Dec. 1779, d. in Paris, Me., 1845; Sophia, b. 5 Jan. 1782, known as a poetess, d. unm. 12 Oct. 1805; Clarissa, b. 4 Ap. 1784, m. Benjamin Johnson of Boston, Mar. 1805, d. in Camb. 1813; William, b. 20 Feb. 1786, d. 15 Mar. 1806; George, b. and d. 1787; Lydia, b. 11 April 1790, m. Rev. William Frothingham of Belfast, Me., 1821; George Washington, b. 21 July 1792, a merchant in Wiscasset, Me., and afterwards editor of the New York Statesman, d. at Keene 28 Feb. 1829; Rebecca, b. 25 Aug. 1794, unm. Rev. Caleb the f. d. of consumption 7 Feb. 1803; his w. Pamela m. Col. John Waldron of Dover, N. H., 14 Sept. 1809, and d. July 1823, a. 73. 39. William, s. of Henry (28), m. Abigail, dau. of William Bordman, and had David Gorham, bap. 19 Mar. 1780; Susanna, bap. 10 Oct. 1796, m.—— Pond. He had also William, a hackman and afterwards a florist; John; Rebecca. William the f. inher
veteran printer and editor of the New Hampshire Sentinel at Keene, N. H., where he d. 6 June 1873; Henry, b. 10 Dec. 1779, d. in Paris, Me., 1845; Sophia, b. 5 Jan. 1782, known as a poetess, d. unm. 12 Oct. 1805; Clarissa, b. 4 Ap. 1784, m. Benjamin Johnson of Boston, Mar. 1805, d. in Camb. 1813; William, b. 20 Feb. 1786, d. 15 Mar. 1806; George, b. and d. 1787; Lydia, b. 11 April 1790, m. Rev. William Frothingham of Belfast, Me., 1821; George Washington, b. 21 July 1792, a merchant in Wiscasset, Me., and afterwards editor of the New York Statesman, d. at Keene 28 Feb. 1829; Rebecca, b. 25 Aug. 1794, unm. Rev. Caleb the f. d. of consumption 7 Feb. 1803; his w. Pamela m. Col. John Waldron of Dover, N. H., 14 Sept. 1809, and d. July 1823, a. 73. 39. William, s. of Henry (28), m. Abigail, dau. of William Bordman, and had David Gorham, bap. 19 Mar. 1780; Susanna, bap. 10 Oct. 1796, m.—— Pond. He had also William, a hackman and afterwards a florist; John; Rebecca. William the f. inher
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union, Company A. (search)
sa Arnold, Stowe, 18, s; farmer. Dec. 15, 1863. Died Aug. 17, 1864. Unof. Benjamin H. Arnold, New Bedford, 19, s; mechanic. Jan. 4, 1864. Wounded Sept. 19, 1864. Trans. to V. R. C. and Disch. Oct. 7, 1865. Francis H. Backus, New Bedford, 37, m; laborer. Aug. 20, 1862. Disch May 20, 1865. Robert H. Bailey, Attleboro, 40, m; farmer. Jan. 5, 1864. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865. Varanus S. Bailey, Attleboro, 18, 8; farmer. Jan. 5, 1864. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865. George Bailey, Wiscasset, Me., 31, s; mariner. Aug. 18, 1862. Deserted Dec. 14, 1862, N. Y. Abraham E. Borden, New Bedford, 33, m; mason. Aug. 21, 1862. Trans. to Sig. Corps Nov. 15, 1862. Scalded to death in Gunboat Clifton, Sabine Pass, Apr. 9, 1863, a shot passing through the boiler. George Berger, Boston, 28, engineer. Nov. 15, 1864. Absent without leave since June 24, 1865. No later record. Andrew P. Bismore, New Bedford, 34, m; cooper. Aug. 20, 1862. Disch. Jan. 18, 1864. Charles A. Bonney
reserve order in the little fleet. Many of the mariners, infected with the vices which at that time degraded their profession, were no better than pirates, and were perpetually bent upon pillaging whatever ships fell in their way. At length, having abandoned one of their barks, the English, now in three vessels only, sailed on further Chap. III.} 1583 discoveries, intending to visit the coast of the United States. But they had not proceeded towards the 1583 south beyond the latitude of Wiscasset, when the largest ship, from the carelessness of the crew, struck and was wrecked. Nearly a hundred men perished; Aug. 27 the mineral-man and the ore were all lost; nor was it possible to rescue Parmenius, the Hungarian scholar, who should have been the historian of the expedition. It now seemed necessary to hasten to England. Gilbert had sailed in the Squirrel, a bark of ten tons only, and therefore convenient for entering harbors and approaching the coast. On the homeward voyage,
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