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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Steuben, Frederick William Augustus, Baron von 1730- (search)
nd lived there until his death, Nov. 28, 1794. He gave a tenth of his estate to his aides—North, Popham, and Walker—and his servants, and parcelled the remainder among twenty or thirty tenants. He was generous, witty, cheerful, and of polished manners. Steuben was buried in his garden at Steubenville. Afterwards, agreeably to his desires, his aides had his remains wrapped in his cloak, placed in a plain coffin, and buried in a grave in the town of Steuben, about 7 miles northwest of Trenton Falls. There, in 1826, a monument was erected over his grave by private subscription, the recumbent slab bearing only his name and title. His grateful aide, Colonel North, caused a great mural monument to be erected to his memory upon the walls of the German Reformed Church edifice in Nassau Street, between John Street and Maiden Lane, New York City, with a long and eulogistic inscription. On the day that Washington resigned his commission as commanderin-chief he wrote to Steuben, making
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Jersey, (search)
square miles, in twenty-one counties. Population in 1890, 1,444,933; 1900, 1,883,669. Capital, Trenton. Henry Hudson, in the ship Half Moon, enters Delaware Bay, Aug. 28, 1609, and coasts the eastern shore of New Jersey on his way to Sandy Hook, where he anchors......Sept. 3, 1609 First Dutch settlement on the Delaware is made near Gloucester, N. J., where Fort Nassau is built......1623 Capt. Thomas Young, receiving a commission from Charles I., sails up the Delaware River to Trenton Falls......Sept. 1, 1634 Number of English families settle on Salem Creek, at a place called by the Indians Asamohaking......1640 Dutch acquire by deed a large tract of land in the eastern part of New Jersey called Bergen......Jan. 30, 1658 Royal charter executed by Charles II., in favor of the Duke of York, of the whole region between the Connecticut and Delaware rivers......March 20, 1664 Present State of New Jersey granted by the Duke of York to Lord John Berkeley and Sir George
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 4: country life at Groton. (1833-1836.) (search)
dge, but prefer giving you the account viva voce. And now I have something to tell you which I hope, oh, I hope will give you as much pleasure as it does me. Mr. and Mrs. Farrar propose taking me, with several other delightful persons, to Trenton Falls this summer. The plan is to set out about the 20th of July, go on to New York, then up the North River to West Point,--pass a day there; then to Catskill,--pass a day there; then on to Trenton, and devote a week to that beautiful scenery. IIt was her first experience of a pleasure which then, perhaps, had a greater zest than now, as being rarer, and involving more adventure. She went to Newport, then dear to her as the summer home of the Rev. Dr. Channing, -to New York, and to Trenton Falls, accounted one of the glories of America in the simple days when the wonders of Colorado and the Yosemite Valley were unknown. In the autumn she met Miss Harriet Martineau at the house of Professor Farrar, and a new delight opened before her
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
ast quiet slumber; and yet I knew he would wake once more before he died. I approached his cot again. He was still sleeping, and so tranquilly I felt a little alarmed lest he might never wake, till I touched his pulse and found it still softly beating. I let him sleep, and thought I would sit by his side till the surgeon came.— I took a long, free breath, for I supposed it was all hopelessly over. Then I thought of his strange history:—I knew it well. He was born not far from Trenton Falls,—the youngest son, among several brothers, of one of the brave tillers of that hard soil. He had seen his family grow up nobly and sturdily, under the discipline of a good religion and good government, and with a determination to defend both. When his country's troubles began, his first impulses thus found expression to his brothers:—Let me go; for you are all married; and if I fall, no matter. He went. He had followed the standard of the Republic into every battle-field where the
ast quiet slumber; and yet I knew he would wake once more before he died. I approached his cot again. He was still sleeping, and so tranquilly I felt a little alarmed lest he might never wake, till I touched his pulse and found it still softly beating. I let him sleep, and thought I would sit by his side till the surgeon came.— I took a long, free breath, for I supposed it was all hopelessly over. Then I thought of his strange history:—I knew it well. He was born not far from Trenton Falls,—the youngest son, among several brothers, of one of the brave tillers of that hard soil. He had seen his family grow up nobly and sturdily, under the discipline of a good religion and good government, and with a determination to defend both. When his country's troubles began, his first impulses thus found expression to his brothers:—Let me go; for you are all married; and if I fall, no matter. He went. He had followed the standard of the Republic into every battle-field where the
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: early essayists (search)
h his rapid glances into the kaleidoscope of society he combined — for his readers-views of famous places, anecdotes of travel, reflections by the way, descriptions of scenery, and observations on customs and characters, in all a delightfully varied mixture and exactly suited to his tastes and abilities. In America he wrote with the same minuteness and freshness of his rural life and rural neighbours at Glenmary and Idlewild, painted vivid word-pictures of such beauty spots as Nahant or Trenton Falls, or sketched fashionable life at Ballston and Saratoga in the days when those watering places were in their first glory. There where woods and streams were enlivened by flowered waistcoats, pink champagne, and the tinkle of serenades, Willis found a setting for some of his most characteristic writing. Jaunty and impermanent as the society it portrayed, his pages yet contain the most valuable deposit left by what Professor Beers has happily called the Albuminous age of American literatu
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
We left Ballston for Saratoga last Monday; were whirled over the beautiful railway from Schenectady to Utica, a distance of eighty miles, in about four hours; were crowded in a foul tavern at Utica; passed a most exciting, brilliant day at Trenton Falls, seventeen miles from Utica,—a natural curiosity, unsurpassed I believe by any in the country, where rocks and water and overhanging trees present all their strangest combinations (I wish you could see them), and fill the mind with the most bing my ears, and in an atmosphere pleasantly cooled by the motion of its waters. This afternoon I shall pass over to the Clifton House, in Canada, where I shall stay a day, previous to embarking for Toronto, Kingston, and Montreal. While at Trenton Falls, I saw Tracy's [Howe] The son of Judge Howe, and a fellow-student of Sumner in the Law School. and his party's names on the book, three days before me. I next met their names at Niagara, which they left the morning of the day on which I ar
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
d. Pray remember me warmly to Kenyon and the Montagus. Tell Kenyon that I confess to owing him a letter, which I shall send very soon. July 15.—To-day, I close my long epistle. Hillard has gone with Cleveland on a horseback excursion to Trenton Falls. He is getting stronger. Hillard's is a beautiful mind. You will be struck on your return, if that ever takes place, by the grace and felicity of his conversation. From his lips there never fall slang, vulgarisms, or coarseness; but all h lap of the mountains; cross the Connecticut River, pass through what is called the Gap in the White Mountains to Portland, Me., and thence to Boston; then, on the Western Railroad, to Berkshire, in the western part of Massachusetts; again to Trenton Falls (you will not miss another sight of them); thence back to the North River; and, descending the river, stop at Catskill and at West Point. Is this not a good plot? Cannot you be present at the annual Commencement of Harvard University (our
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, July 8, 1842. (search)
f Lord Bacon. He and his wife, a most remarkable person, were warm friends of mine. They were both bosom friends of Coleridge, Charles Lamb, and Dr. Parr, and will give you pleasant stories of them. You know Kenyon's intimacy with Coleridge. I think some of his sketches of Coleridge and of his conversation are among the most interesting things I heard in England. Pray remember me warmly to Kenyon and the Montagus. Tell Kenyon that I confess to owing him a letter, which I shall send very soon. July 15.—To-day, I close my long epistle. Hillard has gone with Cleveland on a horseback excursion to Trenton Falls. He is getting stronger. Hillard's is a beautiful mind. You will be struck on your return, if that ever takes place, by the grace and felicity of his conversation. From his lips there never fall slang, vulgarisms, or coarseness; but all his language is refined, choice, and elegant, enlivened by anecdote and literary illustration. . . . Affectionately yours, Charle
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
I cannot afford the loss. My money does go as no other money seems to go. I verily believe, if I had a million it would slip through my open fingers. Similar mishaps befell him in later life, when he could better bear them. He had another in 1859 on the train between Washington and Philadelphia, and still another about the same time at a station in Boston. After delivering his address at Union College he visited Saratoga, where Dr. Howe joined him, and thence he made an excursion to Trenton Falls, Niagara, and Geneseo, at which last place he was a guest at the Wadsworths'. One who heard him at Union College wrote that he made an impression as an orator in whom it is hard to say whether the gifts of nature or the accomplishments of art in its highest sense are most pre-eminent. W. M. G. in the New York Tribune, July 29. George Ripley replied, June 8, 1849, in the same journal, to some criticisms on the address, and received a note of thanks from Sumner. This was the beginning
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