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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Kilpatrick's and Dahlgren's raid to Richmond. (search)
nate. Putting Captain Mitchell in charge of the rear-guard on Tuesday night, he, with Major Cooke, had gone forward with the advance. In the darkness the column became scattered, and Captain Mitchell found himself in charge of the main portion, about three hundred strong, Dahlgren having moved with the remainder in a direction unknown to him. By-great exertions and with sharp skirmishing, Captain Mitchell broke his way through the enemy, and joined Kilpatrick the next day, the 2d, at Tunstall's Station, near White House. Meanwhile Dahlgren had crossed the Pamunkey at Hanovertown and the Mattapony at Aylett's; but late on Wednesday night, March 2d, he fell into an ambush near Walkerton, formed by Captain Fox with home guards of King and Queen County, furloughed men, and Magruder's squadron, and by Lieutenant Pollard with a company of the 9th Virginia. Dahlgren, at the head of his men, fell dead, pierced with a bullet. The greater part of his command was captured. On the second m
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.14 (search)
r General Butler's movement in cooperation with mine, now that I was getting so near Richmond; or, if I could not, whether his position was strong enough to justify me in withdrawing some of his troops and having them brought round by water to White House to join me and reenforce the Army of the Potomac. General Barnard reported the position very strong for defensive purposes, and that I could do the latter with great security; but that General Butler could not move from where he was in cooperac at Spotsylvania, but did not know where either this or Lee's army was now. Great caution therefore had to be exercised in getting back. On the 17th, after resting his command for three days, he started on his return. He moved by the way of White House. The bridge over the Pamunkey had been burned by the enemy, but a new one was speedily improvised, and the cavalry crossed over it. On the 22d he was at Aylett's on the Mattapony, where he learned the position of the two armies. On the 24th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Grant on the Wilderness campaign. (search)
ed Cold Harbor, and held it until relieved by the Sixth Corps and General Smith's command, The Wilderness Tavern. From a photograph taken in 1884. Brass Coehorns in use at Cold Harbor. From a War-time sketch. which had just arrived, via White House, from General Butler's army. On the first day of June an attack was made at 5 P. M. by the Sixth Corps and the troops under General Smith, the other corps being held in readiness to advance on the receipt of orders. This resulted in our caong, and deeming an assault impracticable, returned to Bermuda Hundred without attempting one. Attaching great importance to the possession of Petersburg I sent back to Bermuda Hundred and City Point General Smith's command by water via the White House, to reach there in advance of the Army of the Potomac. This was for the express purpose of securing Petersburg before the enemy, becoming aware of our intention, could reenforce the place. The movement from Cold Harbor commenced after dark
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cold Harbor. June 1st, 1864. (search)
amuel M. Alford; 117th N. Y., Col. Alvin White; 142d N. Y., Col. N. Martin Curtis; 97th Pa., Col. Henry R. Guss. artillery Brigade, Capt. Samuel S. Elder: B, 1st U. S., Capt. S. S. Elder; L, 4th U. S., Lieut. Henry B. Beecher; A, 5th U. S., Lieut. James E. Wilson. On the 1st of June the Army of the Potomac, at and about Cold Harbor, numbered 103,875 present for duty, and General W. F. Smith brought from the Army of the James about 10,000, exclusive of 2500 left to guard the landing at White House. The losses of the Union army from June 1st to 12th were as follows: command.Killed.Wounded. Captured or Missing.Total. Engineers 3  3 Second Army Corps494 24425743,510 Fifth Army Corps149749 4421,340 Sixth Army Corps483 20641682,715 Ninth Army Corps219 11263561,701 Eighteenth Army Corps448 23652063,019 Cavalry Corps51328 70449 Aggregate18449077 181612,737 The Confederate Army, General Robert E. Lee. The organization of the Army of Northern Virginia at Cold Harbor was
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan's Richmond raid. (search)
ive for the enemy. They were glad to watch us at a respectful distance, now that their beloved capital was once more safe. By way of Bottom's Bridge the corps moved to Malvern Hill and Haxall's, where much-needed supplies were procured from Butler's army; many of us exchanged our mud-stained garments for blue flannel shirts from the gun-boats lying in the James, and for the nonce became horse-marines. On the 21st Sheridan, continuing his march to rejoin Grant, crossed the Pamunkey near White House, on the ruins Henry E. Davies, Jr. D. Mom. Gregg. Philip H. Sheridan. Wesley Merritt. A. T. A. Torbert. James H. Wilson. Sheridan and some of his Generals. Fac-Simile of a photograph taken in 1864. of the railroad bridge, after six hours work at repairing it, two regiments at a time working as pioneers. The only incident of the crossing was the fall of a pack-mule from the bridge, from a height of thirty feet. The mule turned a somersault, struck an abutment, disappeared under wat
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Cold Harbor. (search)
uter line of intrenchments in front of our center, somewhat in advance of their main position, which included that on which the battle of Gaines's Mill had been fought two years before. It covered the approaches to the Chickahominy, which was the last formidable obstacle we had to meet before standing in front of the permanent works of Richmond. A large detachment, composed of the Eighteenth Corps and other troops from the Army of the James, under General W. F. Smith, had disembarked at White House on the Pamunkey, and was expected to connect that morning with the Sixth Corps at Cold Harbor. A mistake in orders caused an unnecessary march and long delay. In the afternoon, however, Smith was in position on the right of the Sixth Corps. Late in the afternoon both corps assaulted. The attack was made vigorously, and with no reserves. The outer line in front of the right of the Sixth and the left of the Eighteenth was carried brilliantly, and the enemy was forced back, leaving seve
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Eighteenth Corps at Cold Harbor. (search)
nd ready for removal by water to a point opposite White House on the Pamunkey, there to protect a corps of bridtion in going up the Pamunkey and in getting into White House. The torpedoes on the water or a well-arranged snkey, I determined to land the troops directly at White House, and the debarkation began there on the morning oief-of-staff, directing me to leave a garrison at White House and move with the remainder of tile command to Ne. Leaving General Adelbert Ames with 2500 men at White House, I marched at 3:30 P. m. with about 10,000 infantneral Meade to inform him that, having moved from White House before the arrival of transportation or supplies,having been relieved by other troops from duty at White House.--W. F. S. There was very little straggling dcorps being near Bethesda Church. On that day at White House, fifteen miles to the left, the Eighteenth Army Csame distance to, move. The Eighteenth Corps, at White House, about thirteen miles from Cold Harbor, moved on
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan's Trevilian raid. (search)
f Hunter had rendered it impracticable to carry out his orders in the presence of Hampton. On the 18th of June Sheridan learned that supplies awaited him at White House; which depot he was ordered to break up, transferring its contents to the new base. On the 19th the column crossed the Mattapony at Dunkirk, and on the 20th its commander learned that White House was threatened by the enemy. It was guarded by a small detachment, made up of invalids, dismounted cavalry, and colored infantry, commanded by General Getty, who was en route to join his permanent command. Sheridan moved leisurely to the spot, found the enemy on the bluffs overlooking the depoing made all preparations on the 24th, Sheridan took up the line of march for Petersburg, with his valuable charge of nine hundred wagons. The enemy, foiled at White House, were in an ugly mood. On this day Torbert was in front; Gregg was on the flank, where he was marching parallel with the train when he was attacked, at St. Mar
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
rly was found posted on a ridge west of Waynesboro‘. The veteran soldier was full of pluck and made a bold front for a fight, but his troops were overcome, almost without even perfunctory resistance, by the advance regiments of the column, and Early, with a few general officers, barely escaped capture by flight. All Early's supplies, all transportation, all the guns, ammunition and flags, and most of the officers and men of the army were captured and sent to the rear. From this point Sheridan moved unmolested to the Virginia Central Railroad, which was destroyed for miles, large bridges being wrecked, the track torn up, and the rails heated and bent. The command was divided and sent to the James River Canal, which was destroyed as effectually as the railroad. This done, the cavalry proceeded to White House, on the Pamunkey River, where it arrived on March 19th, 1865. View on the Valley turnpike where Sheridan joined the Army at Cedar Creek. From a photograph taken in 1885.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Grant on the siege of Petersburg. (search)
idge with Bermuda Hundred. On the 19th General Sheridan, on his return from his expedition against the Virginia Central Railroad [see p. 233], arrived at the White House just as the enemy's cavalry was about to attack it, and compelled it to retire. . . . After breaking up the depot at that place he moved to the James River, whind Gordon.--editors. After the long march by General Sheridan's cavalry, from the Shenandoah Valley, over winter roads it was necessary to rest and refit at White House. At this time the greatest source of uneasiness to me was the fear that the enemy would leave his strong lines about Petersburg and Richmond for the purpose ofniting with Johnston, before he was driven from them by battle or I was prepared to make an effectual pursuit. On the 24th of March General Sheridan moved from White House [see p. 494], crossed the James River at Jones's Landing, and formed a junction with the Army of the Potomac in front of Petersburg on the 27th. During this mo
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