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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 5 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 16, 1864., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 3 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Tyler, Texas (Texas, United States) or search for Tyler, Texas (Texas, United States) in all documents.

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ad been made to form a new district and of its military resources. He concluded, after failing to cross the river on account of its overflow, to go to the town of Tyler and there establish his headquarters, which he did, prescribing for himself a district in Texas, east of the Trinity river, and north of what was known as the old d with cloth for tents, knapsacks, and for some clothing, by the State penitentiary at Huntsville, Tex. Many of them were supplied with wagons and teams at or near Tyler, by order of Brig.-Gen. Henry E. McCulloch, some of them also by Maj. J. E. Kirby, who was stationed at that place by General Hebert for the purpose, and to estabapt. Wm. E. Walsh, Henry Trask, lieutenant and adjutant; Wm. Stowe, quartermaster and commissary; and Dr. Rogers, surgeon. A camp of conscription was located near Tyler with Lieut. Willie Thomas in command, aided by Lieutenant Broker. Similar camps were established in different parts of the State from time to time. Their purpose
importation of cotton Gunshops and armory large prison Camp near Tyler operations of military board disposition of hospital fund. Dure manufacture of articles useful in the service were established at Tyler and Bonham and at various other places. At Tyler there was a distiTyler there was a distillery, superintended by a surgeon, for making whisky and medicine for the army. At that place in May, 1862, a partnership was formed, consirmory. They purchased one hundred acres of land one mile south of Tyler, built a large brick house and purchased all the necessary machiner, ordnance officer there with an armory under his control, moved to Tyler with his machinery and working force of sixty men, procured the pur sent to the troops in the field large amounts of provisions. Near Tyler, also, was established a prison camp, in which first and last there at the surrender, whose name is not obtained). These operations at Tyler are mentioned because of the means of information available. With
d States forces made this unnecessary. He held various district commands in Texas, and in September, 1861, succeeded General Van Dorn in command of the department, until the arrival of General Hebert, by whom he was assigned to command in the vicinity of San Antonio, including coast points. On June 12, 1862, by virtue of a commission as brigadier-general, he took command of all the troops within the State east of the Brazos river and north of the old San Antonio road, with headquarters at Tyler, and forwarded troops to Little Rock. Six Texas brigades were put into Arkansas, and he was for a time in command of a division and stationed at Devall's Bluff. Subsequently he was in command of the Northern district of Texas. In the spring and summer of 1863 he operated under General Walker, in command of a brigade composed of the regiments of Colonels Waterhouse, Allen, Fitzhugh and Flournoy, for the relief of Vicksburg, and, under orders from General Taylor, assaulted the almost impregn