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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Alured bishop of Worcester unto Jerusalem, an. 1058. Recorded by Roger Hoveden in parte priore Annalium, fol. 255. linea 15. (search)
The voyage of Alured bishop of Worcester unto Jerusalem, an. 1058. Recorded by Roger Hoveden in parte priore Annalium, fol. 255. linea 15. IN the yere of our Lord 1058. Alured bishop of Worcester , very solemnely dedicated a Church (which himselfe had founded and built in the citie of Glocester) unto the honour of S. Peter the chiefe Apostle: and afterward by the kings permission ordained Wolstan a Monke of Worcester of his owne choice, to be Abbate in the same place. And then having left his BWorcester , very solemnely dedicated a Church (which himselfe had founded and built in the citie of Glocester) unto the honour of S. Peter the chiefe Apostle: and afterward by the kings permission ordained Wolstan a Monke of Worcester of his owne choice, to be Abbate in the same place. And then having left his Bishopricke which was committed unto him over the Church of Wilton, and having resigned the same unto Hermannus above mentioned, passed over the seas, and travailed through Hungarie unto Jerusalem, &c.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The life and travailes of Baldwinus Devonius, sometime Archbishop of Canterbury. (search)
s Devonius, sometime Archbishop of Canterbury. BALDWINE a Devonshire man borne in Exceter of mean parentage, was a very eloquent man, an exact Philosopher, and in those dayes very excellent in all kind of studies. He was first of all a Schoolemaster: afterwards he became an Archdeacon, very famous for his learning & wisdom in all his doings. He was also a Cistercian Monke and Abbot of Foord Monasterie, and the chiefe of all those that were of his order: he grew after this to be bishop of Worcester , and at last after the death of Archb. Richard he was promoted & made Archbishop of Canterbury, and Primate of all England. In the discharge of which place he being very vigilant, shewed himselfe a worthy Pastor, sowing the seed of Gods word in every place as farre foorth as the iniquitie of that time permitted. In his time king Richard with all indevour prepared a Fleet and all things necessary for waging of warre against the Infidels at Jerusalem, taking with him the standerd and ensig
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of William Longespee Earle of Sarisburie into Asia, in the yeere 1248, and in the 32 yeere of the reigne of Henry the third, king of England. (search)
ice to God, that he (if the Councell of his realme would suffer him) would in his owne person visit the Holy land: which matter was opened and debated in the Parliament of France held in the yeere 1247. Where at length it was concluded, that the king according to his vow should take his journey into Asia, and the time thereof was also prefixed, which should be after the feast of S. John Baptist the next yeere ensuing. At which time William Longespee a worthie warrior, with the bishop of Worcester and certaine other great men in the Realme of England (mooved with the example of the Frenchmen) prepared themselves likewise to the same journey. It fell out in this enterprise, that about the beginning of October, the French king assaulted and tooke Damiata, being the principall fort or hold of the Saracens in all Egypt , Anno 1249. and having fortified the Citie with an able garrison left with the Duke of Burgundie, he remooved his tents from thence to goe Eastward. In whose armie
October 30. At Worcester, England, the Conservative Association celebrated its anniversary by a dinner at the Shire Hall. About six hundred persons attended, the hall and anteroom being crowded to inconvenience. The chair was taken by Sir E. A. H. Lechmere. The House of Lords having been proposed by Captain. Candler, the Earl of Shrewsbury and Talbot responded. The House of Lords, he said, was an institution highly valued, and, if he might be allowed to say so, deservedly esteemed by the nation. It had often been said by noisy democrats and clamorous republicans, that the House of Lords was of no use. Reference had been made by previous speakers to the unhappy contention that was going on on the other side of the Atlantic. (Hear.) In America they saw democracy on its trial, and they saw how it failed. (Hear.) He was afraid the result would show that the separation of the two great sections of that country was inevitable, and those who lived long enough would, in his opinio
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agreement of the people, (search)
. Buckinghamshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, 6. Oxfordshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder named, 4; Oxford City, 2; Oxford University, 2. Gloucestershire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Gloucester, 7; Gloucester, 2. Herefordshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Hereford, 4; Hereford, 1. Worcestershire, with the Boroughs. Towns, and Parishes therein, except Worcester, 4; Woreester, 2. Warwickshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Coventry, 5; Corentry, 2. Northamptonshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Northampton. 5 ; Northampton, 1. Bedfordshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, 4. Cambridgeshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder particularly named. 4; Cambridge University, 2; Cambridge Town, 2. Essex, with the Boroughs, Towns, an
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cromwell, Oliver 1599- (search)
om ambitious, but from patriotic motives; but in his efforts Oliver Cromwell. for power after the execution he was a bold operator. When the Scotch partisans of the son of the King (afterwards Charles II.) invaded England and penetrated to Worcester, Cromwell, with 30,000 English troops, gained a decisive victory over them. Grateful to the victor, the government gave him an estate worth $20,000 a year and assigned him Hampton Court as his abode. He now sought supreme rule. On April 20sed by the opposition of men who had acted with him but were honest republicans, which he was not. With shattered body and distracted mind, he sank into the grave from the effects of a tertian fever. He died on the anniversary of the battle of Worcester, Sept. 3, 1658. First protectorate Parliament. The following is Cromwell's speech at the opening session of this body, Sept. 4, 1654: Gentlemen,—You are met here on the greatest occasion that, I believe, England ever saw; having upon
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Great charter (search)
bjects, greeting. Know ye, that we, in the presence of God, and for the health of our soul, and the souls of our ancestors and heirs, and to the honour of God and the exaltation of Holy Church, and amendment of our kingdom; by advice of our venerable fathers, Stephen archbishop of Canterbury, primate of all England, and cardinal of the Holy Roman Church; Henry archbishop of Dublin, William bishop of London, Peter of Winchester, Jocelin of Bath and Glastonbury, Hugh of Lincoln, Walter of Worcester, William of Coventry, Benedict of Rochester, bishops; and Master Pandulph the pope's sub-deacon and familiar, Brother Aymerick master of the Knights Templars in England, and the noble persons, William the marshal, earl of Pembroke, William earl of Salisbury, William earl of Warren, William earl of Arundel, Alan de Galloway, constable of Scotland, Warin Fitzgerald, Peter Fitz-Herbert, and Hubert de Burgh, seneschal of Poictou, Hugo de Nevil, Matthew Fitz-Herbert, Thomas Basset, Alan Basset,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sandys, Edwin 1561-1629 (search)
Sandys, Edwin 1561-1629 Statesman, born in Worcester, England, in 1561; was a son of the Bishop of York; became a pupil of Richard Hooker at Oxford; travelled much in Europe; and, on the accession of King James, was knighted. He became an influential member of the London Company, in which he introduced reforms; and in 1619, being treasurer of the company, he was chiefly instrumental in introducing representative government in Virginia, under Yeardly. The fickle King forbade his re-election in 1620; but he had served the interest of the colony and of humanity by proposing to send young maidens to Virginia to become wives of the planters. He died in Northbourne, Kent, in 1629.
apor-boilers. Cleaners. Circulation. Condensers. Coverings. Draft regulators. Fire-tube boilers. Flashers. Flue and tubular. Furnaces. Furnaces, hydrocarbon. Grates and grate-bars. Heaters and feeders. Incrustation. Indicators. Sectional. Spark-arresters. Superheaters. Tubes and flues. Water fire-boxes. Water-tube. Miscellaneous. The early form of steam-generator was a sphere, as seen in the Aeolipile of Hero; the boilers of Worcester, Papin, and Savery. The flue wound spirally around the outside. For this was substituted a boiler with a hemispherical top and flat or arched bottom; as in those of Newcomen and Leupold. The wagon-boiler — so called from its shape, resembling a wagon with a tilt — was used by Watt, and continues to be used to the present day. It has some variation in its forms, and the sides are sometimes strengthened by stays against collapsing or bulging. It is only used with low pressures.
pupil. G. W. Warren and Francis J. Humphrey were his classmates in this office. He is remembered there, writes the latter gentleman to me, chiefly as a most indefatigable student and lover of books. His personal demeanor was that of a shy and modest maiden. He always greeted me with a cheerful word and a most radiant smile. The notion of arrogance, as a quality in the character of Charles Sumner, can excite in me only the emotion of ridicule. Mr. Sumner was admitted to the bar at Worcester in 1834, and commenced the practice of law in Boston. Thoroughly prepared as he was for meeting the demands of his vocation, he soon came to enjoy extensive patronage. He was shortly afterwards appointed Reporter to the circuit court of the United States; and while serving in this capacity published the three volumes now known as Sumner's Reports, embodying the important legal decisions The following compliment was paid by Baron Parke to Mr. Sumner, and his Reports of the Decisions of
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