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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Navigation and discoverie toward the river of Ob, made by Master Steven Burrough, Master of the Pinnesse called the Serchthrift, with divers things worth the noting passed in the yere 1556. (search)
velvet sheathed knives: and then he seemed somewhat the more willing to tary, and shewed me as much as he knew for our purpose: he also gave me 17 wilde geese, and shewed me that foure of their lodias were driven perforce from Caninoze to this Nova Zembla. This mans name was Loshak. Wednesday, as we plied to the Eastwards, we espied another saile, which was one of this Loshaks company, and we bare roome, and spake with him, who in like sort tolde us of the Ob, as the other had done. Thursdto the Westwards, and a little after the wind came up at West. Saturday was calme: the latitude this day at noone was 70 degrees and a terce, we sounded heere, and had nine and forty fadomes and oze, which oze signified that we drew towards Nova Zembla. And thus we being out of al hope to discover any more to the Eastward this yeere, wee thought it best to returne, and that for three causes. The first, the continuall Northeast and Northerly winds, which have more power after a man is p
onstrations of the way to the Ob, and seemed to make haste on his owne way, being very lothe to tarie, because the yeere was farre past, and his neighbour had fet Pechora, and not he: so I gave him a steele glasse, two pewter spoones, and a paire of velvet sheathed knives: and then he seemed somewhat the more willing to tary, and shewed me as much as he knew for our purpose: he also gave me 17 wilde geese, and shewed me that foure of their lodias were driven perforce from Caninoze to this Nova Zembla. This mans name was Loshak. Wednesday, as we plied to the Eastwards, we espied another saile, which was one of this Loshaks company, and we bare roome, and spake with him, who in like sort tolde us of the Ob, as the other had done. Thursday, we plied to the Eastwards, the winde being at Eastnortheast. Friday, the gale of winde began to increase, and came Westerly withall, so that by a Northwest sunne we were at an anker among the Islands of Vaigats, where we saw two small lodias,
h: at midnight wee cast about, and the shippe caped Northnortheast, making little way. Friday at noone we had the latitude in 70 degrees 8 minutes, and we sounded, and had 29 fadomes sand, and in maner stremy ground. At a West sunne we cast about to the Westwards, and a little after the wind came up at West. Saturday was calme: the latitude this day at noone was 70 degrees and a terce, we sounded heere, and had nine and forty fadomes and oze, which oze signified that we drew towards Nova Zembla. And thus we being out of al hope to discover any more to the Eastward this yeere, wee thought it best to returne, and that for three causes. The first, the continuall Northeast and Northerly winds, which have more power after a man is past to the Eastwards of Caninoze, then in any place that I doe know in these Northerly regions. Second, because of great and terrible abundance of ice which we saw with our eies, and we doubt greater store abideth in those parts: I adventured alre
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Certaine notes unperfectly written by Richard Johnson servant to Master Richard Chancelour, which was in the discoverie of Vaigatz and Nova Zembla, with Steven Burrowe in the Serchthrift 1556. and afterwarde among the Samoedes, whose devilish rites hee describeth. (search)
Certaine notes unperfectly written by Richard Johnson servant to Master Richard Chancelour, which was in the discoverie of Vaigatz and Nova Zembla, with Steven Burrowe in the Serchthrift 1556. and afterwarde among the Samoedes, whose devilish rites hee describeth. FIRST, after we departed out of England we fell with Norway , and on that coste lieth Northbern or Northbergen, and this people are under the King of Denmarke: But they differ in their speech from the Danes, for they speake Nornot suffer the Russes to land out of the Sea, but they will kill them and eate them, as wee are tolde by the Russes: and they live in heards, and have all their carriages with deere, for they have no horses. Beyond Vaygatz lyeth a lande called Nova Zembla, which is a great lande, but wee sawe no people, and there wee had Foule inough, and there wee sawe white Foxes and white Beares. And the sayde Samoeds which are about the bankes of Pechere, which are in subjection to the Emperour of Russia, w
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A remembrance given by us the Governours, Consuls, and Assistants of the company of Merchants trading into Russia , the eight day of May 1561, to our trustie friend Anthonie Jenkinson, at his departure towards Russia , and so to Persia, in this our eight journey. (search)
you shall finde there, and thinke best for our profit. But if passage cannot be had into Persia by Astracan, or otherwise, the next Summer, which shalbe in the yeere 1562, then our minde is, that you procure to sell our kersies, & other such wares as are appointed for Persia, in the Mosco, or other the Emperours dominions, if you may sell them for any reasonable price, and then to employ your selfe with such other of your servants, as you shall thinke meet for the search of the passage by Nova Zembla, or els you to returne for England as you thinke good. Provided alwayes, that if you do perceive or understand, that passage is like to be had into Persia the Summer folowing, which shalbe in the yere 1563, and that you can not sell our kersies in the Emperours dominions, as aforesayd, at a reasonable price: then we will rather they may be kept till the said Summer in the yeere 1563, and then you to proceed forwards upon your journey towards Persia as aforesayd. If passage into Persia can
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A Commission given by us Thomas Randolfe Ambassadour for the Queenes Majestie in Russia , and Thomas Bannister, &c. unto James Bassendine, James Woodcocke and Richard Browne, the which Bassendine, Woodcocke, and Browne we appoint joyntly together, and aiders, the one of them to the other, in a voyage of discovery to be made (by the grace of God) by them, for searching of the sea, and border of the coast, from the river Pechora, to the Eastwards, as hereafter followeth Anno 1588. The first of August. (search)
t, almost halfe way from the coast of Hugorie, unto the coast of Nova Zembla, which Island Vaigats and Nova Zembla you shall finde noted in y prove to incline and trend to the Northwards, and so joyne with Nova Zembla, making the sea from Vaigats to the Eastwards but a bay: yet we and so by the trending of the land come backe unto that part of Nova Zembla that is against Vaigats, whereas you may from that see the said shall from thence passe alongst by the said border and coast of Nova Zembla to the Westwards, and so to search whether that part of Nova ZemNova Zembla doe joyne with the land that sir Hugh Willoughbie discovered in anno 53, and is in 72 degrees, and from that part of Nova Zembla 120 leagNova Zembla 120 leagues to the Westwards, as your plat doeth shew it unto you: and if you doe finde that land to joyne with Nova Zembla, when you come to it, youNova Zembla, when you come to it, you shall proceed further along the same coast, if the time of the yere will permit it, and that you doe thinke there will be sufficient time fo
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A dedicatorie Epistle unto the Queenes most excellent Majestie, written by Master William Burrough late Comptroller of her Highnesse navie, and annexed unto his exact and notable mappe of Russia , briefly containing (amongst other matters) his great travailes, observations, and experiments both by sea and land, especially in those Northeastern parts. (search)
graphie from my youth (most excellent my dread Soveraigne) hath eftsoones beene moved by diligent studie to search out the chiefest points to them belonging: and not therewith sufficed hath also sought by experience in divers discoveries and other voyages and travailes to practise the same. I was in the first voyage for discoverie of the partes of Russia , which begun in anno 1553. (being then sixteene yeeres of age) also in the yeere 1556. in the voyage when the coastes of Samoed and Nova Zembla, with the straightes of Vaigatz were found out: and in the yeere 1557, when the coast of Lappia, and the bay of S. Nicholas were more perfectly discovered. Since which time, by my continuall practise in the voyages made yeerely to S. Nicholas in Russia , or to the Narve, and to some other countreys also by Sea: as likewise in passing from S. Nicholas to Mosco, and from Mosco to Narve, and from thence backe againe to S. Nicholas by land, in the yeeres 1574. and 1575. (being then Agent in t
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Commission given by sir Rowland Hayward knight, and George Barne, Aldermen and governours of the company of English Merchants, for discovery of new trades, unto Arthur Pet, and Charles Jackman, for a voyage by them to be made, for discovery of Cathay, 1580. in forme following. (search)
veniently you may) to the ende you may discover, whether the same Willoughbies land be continent and firme land with Nova Zembla, or not: notwithstanding we would not have you to entangle your selves in any Bay, or otherwise, so that it might hindell in with your barkes, do you then the next summer returne backe through Boroughs streights: And from that part of Nova Zembla, adjoyning to the same streights, doe you come alongst the tract of that coast Westwards, keeping it on the starbord swards bound you shall not happen to discover and trie whether the said Willoughbies land joyne continent with the same Nova Zembla, or not. But if you shall then prove them to be one firme and continent, you may from Nova Zembla direct your course uNova Zembla direct your course unto the said Willoughbies land, as you shall thinke good, and as you may most conveniently: and from Willoughbies land you shall proceed Westwards alongst the tract of it, (though it incline Northerly) even so farre as you may or can travell, havi
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Notes in writing, besides more privie by mouth, that were given by M. Richard Hakluyt of Eiton in the Countie of Hereford, Esquire, Anno 1580: to M. Arthur Pet, and to M. Charles Jackman, sent by the Merchants of the Moscovie companie for the discovery of the Northeast straight, not altogether unfit for some other enterprises of discovery, hereafter to be taken in hand. (search)
of havens and harborowes. AND if no such Islands may bee found in the Scithian sea toward the firme of Asia, then are you to search out the ports that be about Nova Zembla, all along the tract of that land, to the end you may winter there the first yeere, if you be let by contrary winds, and to the end that if we may in short time unto Cambalu, and unlade and set saile againe for returne without venturing there at Cambalu, that you may on your way come as farre in returne as a port about Nova Zembla: that the summer following, you may the sooner be in England for the more speedy vent of your East commodities, and for the speedier discharge of your Mariners : if you cannot go forward and backe in one selfe same Summer. And touching the tract of the land of Nova Zembla, toward the East out of the circle Arcticke in the more temperate Zone, you are to have regard: for if you finde the soyle planted with people, it is like that in time an ample vent of our warme wollen clothes may be
of havens and harborowes. AND if no such Islands may bee found in the Scithian sea toward the firme of Asia, then are you to search out the ports that be about Nova Zembla, all along the tract of that land, to the end you may winter there the first yeere, if you be let by contrary winds, and to the end that if we may in short time unto Cambalu, and unlade and set saile againe for returne without venturing there at Cambalu, that you may on your way come as farre in returne as a port about Nova Zembla: that the summer following, you may the sooner be in England for the more speedy vent of your East commodities, and for the speedier discharge of your Mariners : if you cannot go forward and backe in one selfe same Summer. And touching the tract of the land of Nova Zembla, toward the East out of the circle Arcticke in the more temperate Zone, you are to have regard: for if you finde the soyle planted with people, it is like that in time an ample vent of our warme wollen clothes may be
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