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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The English Voyages, Navigations, and Discoveries (intended for the finding of a North-west passage) to the North parts of America, to Meta incognita, and the backeside of Gronland , as farre as 72 degrees and 12 minuts: performed first by Sebastian Cabota, and since by Sir Martin Frobisher, and M. John Davis, with the Patents, Discourses, and Advertisements thereto belonging. (search)
ot away, who being left behind the Fleete in great danger of never getting forth, was forced to seeke a way Northward thorow an unknowen channell full of rocks, upon the backe side of Beares sound, and there by good hap found out a way into the North sea , a very dangerous attempt: save that necessitie, which hath no law, forced them to trie masteries. This aforesayd North sea is the same which lyeth upon the backe side of Frobishers straits, where first the Generall himselfe in his Pinnesses, North sea is the same which lyeth upon the backe side of Frobishers straits, where first the Generall himselfe in his Pinnesses, and after some other of our company have discovered (as they affirme) a great foreland, where they would have also a great likelihood of the greatest passage towards the South sea, or Mar del Sur. The Busse of Bridgewater, as she came homeward, to the Southeastward of Friseland, discovered a great Island in the latitude of 57 degrees and an halfe, which was never yet found before, and sailed three dayes alongst the coast, the land seeming to be fruitfull, full of woods, and a champion Countre
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A true discourse of the three Voyages of discoverie, for the finding of a passage to Cathaya, by the Northwest, under the conduct of Martin Frobisher Generall: Before which, as a necessary Preface is prefixed a twofolde discourse, conteining certaine reasons to prove all partes of the World habitable. Penned by Master George Best, a Gentleman employed in the same voyages. (search)
ot away, who being left behind the Fleete in great danger of never getting forth, was forced to seeke a way Northward thorow an unknowen channell full of rocks, upon the backe side of Beares sound, and there by good hap found out a way into the North sea , a very dangerous attempt: save that necessitie, which hath no law, forced them to trie masteries. This aforesayd North sea is the same which lyeth upon the backe side of Frobishers straits, where first the Generall himselfe in his Pinnesses, North sea is the same which lyeth upon the backe side of Frobishers straits, where first the Generall himselfe in his Pinnesses, and after some other of our company have discovered (as they affirme) a great foreland, where they would have also a great likelihood of the greatest passage towards the South sea, or Mar del Sur. The Busse of Bridgewater, as she came homeward, to the Southeastward of Friseland, discovered a great Island in the latitude of 57 degrees and an halfe, which was never yet found before, and sailed three dayes alongst the coast, the land seeming to be fruitfull, full of woods, and a champion Countre
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The third voyage of Captaine Frobisher, pretended for the discoverie of Cataia, by Meta Incognita, Anno Do. 1578. (search)
ot away, who being left behind the Fleete in great danger of never getting forth, was forced to seeke a way Northward thorow an unknowen channell full of rocks, upon the backe side of Beares sound, and there by good hap found out a way into the North sea , a very dangerous attempt: save that necessitie, which hath no law, forced them to trie masteries. This aforesayd North sea is the same which lyeth upon the backe side of Frobishers straits, where first the Generall himselfe in his Pinnesses, North sea is the same which lyeth upon the backe side of Frobishers straits, where first the Generall himselfe in his Pinnesses, and after some other of our company have discovered (as they affirme) a great foreland, where they would have also a great likelihood of the greatest passage towards the South sea, or Mar del Sur. The Busse of Bridgewater, as she came homeward, to the Southeastward of Friseland, discovered a great Island in the latitude of 57 degrees and an halfe, which was never yet found before, and sailed three dayes alongst the coast, the land seeming to be fruitfull, full of woods, and a champion Countre
ot away, who being left behind the Fleete in great danger of never getting forth, was forced to seeke a way Northward thorow an unknowen channell full of rocks, upon the backe side of Beares sound, and there by good hap found out a way into the North sea , a very dangerous attempt: save that necessitie, which hath no law, forced them to trie masteries. This aforesayd North sea is the same which lyeth upon the backe side of Frobishers straits, where first the Generall himselfe in his Pinnesses, North sea is the same which lyeth upon the backe side of Frobishers straits, where first the Generall himselfe in his Pinnesses, and after some other of our company have discovered (as they affirme) a great foreland, where they would have also a great likelihood of the greatest passage towards the South sea, or Mar del Sur. The Busse of Bridgewater, as she came homeward, to the Southeastward of Friseland, discovered a great Island in the latitude of 57 degrees and an halfe, which was never yet found before, and sailed three dayes alongst the coast, the land seeming to be fruitfull, full of woods, and a champion Countre
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Divers voyages made by Englishmen to the famous Citie of Mexico, and to all or most part of the other principall provinces, cities, townes and places throughout the great and large kingdom of New Spaine, even as farre as Nicaragua and Panama, & thence to Peru : together with a description of the Spaniards forme of government there: and sundry pleasant relations of the maners and customes of the natural inhabitants, and of the manifold rich commodities & strange rarities found in those partes of the continent: & other matters most worthy the observation. (search)
s of the said city, dwelt above 300000. as it was thought, and many more. This City of Mexico is 65. leagues from the North sea , and 75. leagues from the South sea, so that it standeth in the midst of the maine land, betwixt the one sea and the otince of Nicoia, and Nicaragua. From Nicaragua I travelled by land to a province called Nicamula (which lieth toward the North sea in certaine high mountaines) for that I could not passe thorow the kingdome of Guatimala at that time for waters, whereich was my companion in this journey, we went together toward the province of Panuco, which lieth upon the coast of the North sea , and within three dayes journey we entred a city called Mestitlan, where there dwelt twelve Spanyards: the Indian inhabewith they use to die) as also hides and annile. By this there lieth the province of Iucatan, nere the Honduras by the North sea coast, where there is also another bishop, and a towne likewise named Iucatan, where there dwell a few Spanyards. The
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Robert Tomson Marchant, into Nova Hispania in the yeere 1555. with divers observations concerning the state of the Countrey: And certaine accidents touching himselfe. (search)
dians, and villages, and many goodly fieldes of medow grounds, Rivers of fresh waters, forrests, and great woods, very pleasant to behold. From Pueblo de los Angeles, to Mexico, is 20. leagues of very faire way and countrey, as before is declared. Mexico was a Citie in my time, of not above 1500. housholds of Spaniards inhabiting there, but of Indian people in the suburbs of the said city, dwelt above 300000. as it was thought, and many more. This City of Mexico is 65. leagues from the North sea , and 75. leagues from the South sea, so that it standeth in the midst of the maine land, betwixt the one sea and the other. It is situated in the middest of a lake of standing water, and environed round about with the same, saving in many places, going out of the Citie, are many broad wayes through the said lake or water. This lake and Citie is environed also with great mountaines round about, which are in compasse above thirtie leagues, and the saide Citie, and lake of standing water, doe
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A notable discourse of M. John Chilton, touching the people, maners, mines, cities, riches, forces, and other memorable things of New Spaine, and other provinces in the West Indies, seene and noted by himselfe in the time of his travels, continued in those parts, the space of seventeene or eighteene yeeres. (search)
e of Guatimala, and arrived in the province of Nicoia, and Nicaragua. From Nicaragua I travelled by land to a province called Nicamula (which lieth toward the North sea in certaine high mountaines) for that I could not passe thorow the kingdome of Guatimala at that time for waters, wherewith all the Low countreys of the provinc2) in the company of another Spanyard, which was my companion in this journey, we went together toward the province of Panuco, which lieth upon the coast of the North sea , and within three dayes journey we entred a city called Mestitlan, where there dwelt twelve Spanyards: the Indian inhabitants there were about thirty thousand. is a certeine wood called campeche, (wherewith they use to die) as also hides and annile. By this there lieth the province of Iucatan, nere the Honduras by the North sea coast, where there is also another bishop, and a towne likewise named Iucatan, where there dwell a few Spanyards. They have no force at all in all this coast
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
nking it good to suffer fiftie English men to remaine in the countrey, sent a servant of his called Diego de Frees, with a hundreth and fifty shot into the mountaines to seeke them out, who found them making of certaine Canoas to goe into the North sea , and there to take some barke or other: some of them were sicke, and were taken, and the rest fled with the Negros, who in the end betrayed them to the Spaniards, so that they were brought to Panama. And the Justice of Panama asked the English , so these dwellers doe say that in Sommer the wayes are very good without either dirt or water. The other entrance is up the river of Chagre, which rivers mouth lyeth eighteene leagues from Nombre de Dios to the Westwards falling into the North sea , and this is the place which the citizens of Panama doe most feare, for they may come up this river to Venta de Cruzes, and so from thence march to this citie, which is but five leagues off. So up this river there goe boates and barkes which do
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of John Oxnam of Plimmouth, to the west India , and over the straight of Dariene into the South sea. Anno 1575. Written by the foresaid Lopez Vaz in the said discourse. (search)
they sent advise also to Nombre de dios, and they of Nombre de dios sent also from them other foure barkes which (as the Spaniards say) found the English ship where she was hid, and brought her to Nombre de dios: and that the Viceroy of Peru not thinking it good to suffer fiftie English men to remaine in the countrey, sent a servant of his called Diego de Frees, with a hundreth and fifty shot into the mountaines to seeke them out, who found them making of certaine Canoas to goe into the North sea , and there to take some barke or other: some of them were sicke, and were taken, and the rest fled with the Negros, who in the end betrayed them to the Spaniards, so that they were brought to Panama. And the Justice of Panama asked the English captaine whether hee had the Queenes licence, or the licence of any other Prince or Lord for his attempt. And he answered he had none, whereupon hee and all his company were condemned to dye, and so were all executed, saving the Captaine, the Master,
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A relation of the ports, harbors, forts and cities in the west Indies which have bene surveied, edified, finished, made and mended, with those which have bene builded, in a certaine survey by the king of Spaine his direction and commandement: Written by Baptista Antonio, surveyour in those parts for the said King. Anno 1587. (search)
ng up of certaine rockes and mountaines which they must climbe, called the mountaines of Capira, which are of height three quarters of a league, so in this place with very small store of souldiers wee can defend our selves from the fury of the enemie, so these dwellers doe say that in Sommer the wayes are very good without either dirt or water. The other entrance is up the river of Chagre, which rivers mouth lyeth eighteene leagues from Nombre de Dios to the Westwards falling into the North sea , and this is the place which the citizens of Panama doe most feare, for they may come up this river to Venta de Cruzes, and so from thence march to this citie, which is but five leagues off. So up this river there goe boates and barkes which doe carry. 320. Quintals waight. These are they which carry the most part of the marchandize which doe come from Spaine to be transported to Peru , and from Venta de Cruzes it is carried to Limaret which is three leagues off that place, and the dweller
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