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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: Marylanders enlist, and organize to defend Virginia and the Confederacy. (search)
ers was mustered into the Sixth Virginia under Capt. J. Sturgis Davis. Subsequently five troops of Marylanders were collected under Davis and were known as the Davis Battalion, of which he was commissioned major. Capt. Elijah V. White, of Montgomery county, organized a dashing troop of Marylanders as escort and headquarters guard for General Ewell, which was afterwards enlarged into the Thirty-fifth Virginia battalion, commanded by Lieut.-Col. Lije White. It was a Maryland command. Harry Gitinction in the defense of Fort Sumter, for a large part of the garrison of that fortress during its bombardment were Marylanders. During the autumn of 1862 seven troops of Marylanders were collected under Lieut.-Col. Ridgely Brown, from Montgomery county, as the First Maryland cavalry. When the First regiment was mustered out of service August 12, 1862, on account of its depleted ranks, which had been worn threadbare by Jackson's Valley campaign and the Seven Days battles, the men who were
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: the Maryland Line. (search)
midnight. He stopped at the Caves, the place of John Canon, Esq., about midnight, to feed. While there his couriers from Hayfields got up and reported that the Nineteenth corps, General Emory, had arrived in transports and was at Locust Point and was being landed on the trains of the Baltimore & Ohio and hurried to Washington. Johnson sent this information to Early by an officer and five men, with orders to ride at speed, seizing horses as fast as theirs gave out. Thence he rode across Montgomery and Howard counties to Beltsville on the Baltimore & Ohio railroad to Washington, where he struck a thousand Federal cavalry and drove them helter-skelter into Bladensburg. After cutting the railroad he started for Point Lookout, distant eighty miles, with seventeen hours to make it. He sent couriers ahead to tell the people he was coming, and that they must have their horses on the roadside ready to be exchanged for his broken-down ones. They would have done it, for they were all arden
y, Mo., August 17, 1861, by the election of Col. Evander McNair, of Hempstead county; Lieut.-Col. A. Bryce Williams, of Hempstead county; Maj. J. H. Clay, of Montgomery county. The regiment was reorganized at Corinth, Miss., May 8, 1862. The companies were commanded as follows: Company A, of Calhoun county, Capt. Joseph B. McCull First Lieut. Henry J. Bonner, Second Lieut. J. W. Paup, Third Lieut. John L. Loudermilk; Henry J. Bonner, made captain at the reorganization. Company C, of Montgomery county, Capt. F. J. Erwin, First Lieut. Nathaniel Grant, Second Lieut. J. Scott, Third Lieut. J. Bates. Company D, of LaFayette county, Capt. Joseph C. Tyson, First The Twenty-fifth Arkansas infantry was organized in August, 1861, by the election of Col. Charles Turnbull, of Little Rock; Lieut.-Col. Henry Remington, of Montgomery county, who resigned, and Eli Hufstedler was made lieutenant-colonel; Maj. James J. Franklin. The commanders of companies were: Company A, Eli Hufstedler, promoted
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
4, 2; 24, 3; 118, 1; 149, C1; 154, B11 Vicinity of, toward Corinth, Miss. 13, 6 Monterey, Va. 30, 5; 84, 9, 84, 10; 85, 1; 116, 3, 116, 4; 135-A; 135-C, 1; 137, C2; 140, H13 Montevallo, Ala. 76, 1; 117, 1; 135-A; 148, C6 Montevallo, Mo. 160, A11; 161, H11 Montezuma, Tenn. 135-A Montgomery, Ala. 74, 3; 76, 1; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 148, E7; 171 Action, April 12, 1865 74, 3 Montgomery, Tenn. 9, 2; 24, 3; 30, 2; 135-A; 150, F6; 171 Montgomery County, Md. 7, 1 Monticello, Ark. 47, 1; 135-A; 154, F4 Monticello, Ky. 9, 2; 118, 1; 135-A; 150, E11; 171 Moon's Station, Ga. 59, 3; 62, 13; 149, G12 Moorefield, W. Va. 74, 1; 82, 3; 84, 3, 84, 22; 85, 1; 100, 1; 116, 3; 135-A; 137, A3 Skirmishes, Nov. 27-28, 1864 84, 3 Mooresville, Ala. 24, 3; 61, 9; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A Fort Morgan, Ala. 63, 1, 63, 6; 110, 1; 135-A; 147, F3; 171 Siege, Aug. 9-22, 1864 63, 1, 63, 6 Morganfield, Ky. 1
Cantey's brigade, near Kenesaw mountain, June 12th. No. 78— (589) Mentioned by General Clanton, Montgomery, May 9, 1864. (610) Mentioned in artillery returns of James L. Hoole, May 19th, as at Pollard. (858) In Trueheart's battalion, Stewart's corps, Hood's army, September 20th. No. 93—(668) Same assignment, Nashville campaign. No. 103—(1047) In Grayson's battalion, district of the Gulf, March 10, 1865. Clanton's battery. Clanton's battery, Capt. N. H. Clanton, was organized in Montgomery county, in June, 1863, and was attached to General Clanton's brigade. It was for a time at Pollard and Mobile, was ordered to Gadsden, and served in northern and central Alabama and Georgia. Part of it was engaged near Rome, Ga. It was in the neighborhood of Columbus, Ga., at the close of the war. Extracts from official war Records. No. 42—(131, 157) In Gen. J. G. Clanton's brigade, August, 1863. (239) General Clanton's report, Pollard, Ala., September 19th. (275, 402,
ent from South Carolina to Alabama in 1818 and became a planter near Montgomery. His mother was a Miss Sayre, sister of Daniel Sayre, a prominent citizen of Montgomery county. With a preparatory education in the schools of his own city, young Allen entered Princeton college, New Jersey. After graduation he studied law, but with ited and received the confidence and esteem of his people. He died at Sheffield, Ala., November 21, 1894. His wife was a sister of Col. Charles P. Ball, of Montgomery county. Brigadier-General Alpheus Baker was born at Clover Hill, Abbeville district, S. C., May 28, 1828. His father, an eminent teacher and scholar, was a natiin county in 1827, the son of a planter and lawyer, whose wife was an aunt of Hon. Augustus R. Wright of that State. He moved to Alabama in 1847, settled in Montgomery county and engaged in mercantile business, in which he continued, except during a residence in California for eight years, from 1850. He was living in Montgomery w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
Infield artillery the production was confined almost entirely to the Tredegar Works, in Richmond. Some castings were made in New Orleans, and foundries were rapidly acquiring the necessary experience to produce good bronze castings. The Ordnance Department of Tennessee was also turning its attention to the manufacture of field and seige artillery at Nashville. At Rome, Ga., a foundry—Noble & Son — was induced to undertake the casting of three-inch rifles, after drawings furnished at Montgomery; but the progress made was necessarily slow. The State of Virginia possessed a number of old four-pounder iron guns, which were reamed out to get a good bore, and were rifled with three grooves, after the manner of Parrott. The army in observation at Harper's Ferry, and that at Manassas, were supplied with old batteries of six-pounder guns and twelve-pounder Howitzers. A few Parrott guns purchased by the State of Virginia were with Magruder at Big Bethel. For the ammunition and equi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Arsenals, workshops, foundries, etc. (search)
Infield artillery the production was confined almost entirely to the Tredegar Works, in Richmond. Some castings were made in New Orleans, and foundries were rapidly acquiring the necessary experience to produce good bronze castings. The Ordnance Department of Tennessee was also turning its attention to the manufacture of field and seige artillery at Nashville. At Rome, Ga., a foundry—Noble & Son — was induced to undertake the casting of three-inch rifles, after drawings furnished at Montgomery; but the progress made was necessarily slow. The State of Virginia possessed a number of old four-pounder iron guns, which were reamed out to get a good bore, and were rifled with three grooves, after the manner of Parrott. The army in observation at Harper's Ferry, and that at Manassas, were supplied with old batteries of six-pounder guns and twelve-pounder Howitzers. A few Parrott guns purchased by the State of Virginia were with Magruder at Big Bethel. For the ammunition and equi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Military operations of General Beauregard. (search)
al importance could not escape the attention of one who, like General Beauregard, had been assigned to so high a position in the defence of his country. Early in May, 1861, when the blast of the clarion had hardly sounded defiance to the enemy, the General pressed upon the Government the adoption of a plan which seemed feasible, and which might have been of incalculable advantage to the Confederate States. A fleet of ten East India steamers was offered the Confederate Government, then at Montgomery, through Mr. W. L. Trenholm, speaking in the name and by authority of the house of John Frazer & Co., of Liverpool. His father, like himself, an American—Hon. George A. Trenholm—was a member of that English house, and stood so high in the estimate of our Government that he was subsequently appointed Secretary of the Treasury, after the resignation of Mr. Memminger. The character and position of that individual should have given great weight to that proposition. Mr. Prioleau, one of th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association (search)
across the Potomac at Berlin, and with two other brigades drove away the Federal cavalry pickets near the mouth of Monocacy, and crossed at White's Ford. During the night of the 4th and day of the 5th, Lee's whole army crossed at the same place, the cavalry, under Stuart, bringing up the rear. The infantry camped that night at the Three Springs, in Frederick county, nine miles from Frederick. The cavalry passedat once to the flank, and extended an impenetrable veil of pickets across Montgomery and Frederick counties, from the Potomac to New Market, beyond the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, and on the National turnpike from Baltimore to Frederick. Robertson's brigade, under Munford, was posted on the right with his advance at Poolesville; Hampton's at Hyattstown, and Fitz. Lee's at New Market; cavalry headquarters were established at Urbana, eight miles soutwest of Frederick, and in the rear of the centre of the line thus established. This was the position on the night of Septemb
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