Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 3, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) or search for Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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iz: Nine deserters from Camp Lee, arrested in this city. James Gilmer, a Pennsylvanian, found within our lines, arrested by order of Gen Brans; James Gorant, of Loudoun county is a suspicious character. Thomas Moss of Loudoun any and pilot to the Yankee Charles Standen a suspicious character, taken at Harper's Ferry has and James for trading with Yankee and John Hart, company E. 5th couchant regiment, for attempting to pass into the enemy's lines while Jackson's army occupied Harper's Ferry. iz: Nine deserters from Camp Lee, arrested in this city. James Gilmer, a Pennsylvanian, found within our lines, arrested by order of Gen Brans; James Gorant, of Loudoun county is a suspicious character. Thomas Moss of Loudoun any and pilot to the Yankee Charles Standen a suspicious character, taken at Harper's Ferry has and James for trading with Yankee and John Hart, company E. 5th couchant regiment, for attempting to pass into the enemy's lines while Jackson's army occupied Harper's Ferry.
Return of captured wagons. After the surrender of Harper's Ferry a number of the wagons captured from the enemy were loaned to the paroled Federal officers, with which to convey away their private baggage. These wagons were returned to Gen. Lee about ten days since, having been sent through by flag of truce from Harper's Ferry. Many of them were in a decidedly dilapidated condition, and indicated, as well as the horses attached to them, that they had received rough usage since they becamer the surrender of Harper's Ferry a number of the wagons captured from the enemy were loaned to the paroled Federal officers, with which to convey away their private baggage. These wagons were returned to Gen. Lee about ten days since, having been sent through by flag of truce from Harper's Ferry. Many of them were in a decidedly dilapidated condition, and indicated, as well as the horses attached to them, that they had received rough usage since they became the property of the Confederacy.