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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 36 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 20 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Poinsett, Joel Roberts 1779-1851 (search)
Poinsett, Joel Roberts 1779-1851 Legislator; born in Charleston, S. C., March 2, 1779; educated at Timothy Dwight's school, Greenfield, Conn., at Edinburgh University, and the Woolwich Academy, England. In 1809 he was sent to the South American states by the President for the purpose of inquiring into the prospects of the Spanish colonies winning their independence. While on this mission he was notified that the Spanish authorities in Peru had seized a number of American vessels. Appealing to the republican government for assistance, he was authorized to use force in the recapture of the ships, which he successfully accomplished. He was a member of Congress in 1821-25, and in the latter year was appointed United States minister to Mexico. President Van Buren appointed him Secretary of War in 1837. He published his notes on Mexico, made in 1822, with a historical sketch of the revolution. He died in Statesburg, S. C., Dec. 12, 1851.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sherman, William Tecumseh 1820-1829 (search)
Ogeechee River, and, if possible, to release Union captives in the prison-pen at Millen. Kilpatrick and Wheeler had several skirmishes, but no severe battles. On Nov. 30, Sherman's whole army, excepting one corps, had passed the Ogeechee. This was a most skilful manoeuvre; and then, having destroyed the principal railways in Georgia over long distances, Sherman was prepared to make a final conquest of the State. Moving on seaward, the division of Hazen had a severe skirmish (Dec. 4) at Statesburg, south of the Ogeechee. General Sherman's headquarters during March to the sea. Attack on Fort McAllister. The Confederates were dispersed. On the same day Kilpatrick fought Wheeler on the railway between Millen and Augusta, drove him from his barricades through Waynesboro, and pushed him 8 miles, while a supporting column of Union infantry under Baird were tearing up the railway and destroying bridges. When Sherman reached Millen, the Union prisoners had been removed; and he pu
form a junction with me this side of Greensboroa (North Carolina). Believing it best, from the information just received from Governor Vance and General Bragg, to transport the troops by rail to that point, I have directed General McLaws to move them by rail as rapidly as possible. I am also of the opinion that Cheatham, at Newberry, this morning, with two thousand men, and Stewart, eighteen hours behind him, with twelve hundred, cannot form a junction with me except by moving across, via Statesburg and Manchester, and thence, by rail, to Greensboroa. This movement will require some days, owing to the difficulties of crossing Broad and Wateree rivers. The enemy has advanced to-day to near Winnsboroa, in force, and is still moving along the railroad, keeping between this place and Broad River, thus cutting off Cheatham and Stewart. G. T. Beauregard. This was before the enemy had decided to move eastward. General McLaws was informed of the countermanded movement, and General Bra
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, South Carolina, 1865 (search)
ry "F," 3d Light Arty.; 56th and 157th Infantry. OHIO--25th and 107th Infantry. UNITED STATES--32d and 102d Colored Infantry. April 9: Skirmish, Dingle's MillsNEW YORK--Battery "F," 3d Light Arty.; 56th and 157th Infantry. April 15: Skirmish, StatesburgMASSACHUSETTS--4th Cavalry (Detachment); 54th (Colored) Infantry. NEW YORK--Battery "F," 3d Light Arty.; 56th and 157th Infantry. OHIO--25th and 107th Infantry. UNITED STATES--32d and 102d (Colored) Infantry. April 17: Occupation of CamdenMASSA YORK--Battery "F" 3d Light Arty.; 56th and 157th Infantry. OHIO--25th and 107th Infantry. UNITED STATES--32d and 102d (Colored) Infantry. Union loss, 9 killed, 18 wounded, 1 missing. Total, 28. April 19: Skirmish, Denkin's Mills and at Beech Creek, near StatesburgMASSACHUSETTS--4th Cavalry (Detachment); 54th (Colored) Infantry. NEW YORK--Battery "F" 3d Light Arty.; 56th and 157th Infantry. OHIO--25th and 107th Infantry. UNITED STATES--32d and 102d (Colored) Infantry. Union loss, 10 wounded.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Massachusetts Volunteers. (search)
r 30. Expedition to Deveaux's Neck December 1-6. March to Charleston January 15-February 23, 1865. Potter's Expedition to Camden, S. C., April 5-25. Statesburg April 15. Occupation of Camden April 17. Boykin's Mills April 18. Denkin's Mills April 19. Beech Creek, near Statesburg, April 19. Duty in the DeStatesburg, April 19. Duty in the Dept. of the South till mustered out. 3rd Battalion.--(Cos. E, F, G and H. ) Sailed from Boston for Hilton Head, S. C., on Steamer Western Metropolis April 23, 1864, arriving April 27. Moved to Newport News, Va., May 1-3; thence to City Point May 23, and duty there scouting, picketing and on the fortifications till June 16. s' Bridge, Black River, April 7. Dingle's Mills April 9. Destruction of Rolling Stock at Wateree Junction April 11. Singleton's Plantation April 12. Statesburg April 15. Occupation of Camden April 17. Boykin's Mills April 18. At Georgetown April 25. Duty at Georgetown, Charleston, and various points in Sout
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
ition to Camden, S. C., April 5-25. Dingle's Mills April 9. Statesburg April 15. Occupation of Camden April 17. Boykin's Mills April 18. Denkin's Mills and Beech Creek near Statesburg April 19. Duty in Dept. of the South till July. Mustered out at Syracuse, N. Y.ition to Camden, S. C., April 5-25. Dingle's Mills April 9. Statesburg April 15. Occupation of Camden April 17. Boykin's Mills April 18. Denkin's Mills and Beech Creek, near Statesburg, April 19. Duty in Northern and Western Districts of South Carolina till Septembe 5-25. Dingle's Mills April 9. Operations about Sumpter and Statesburg April 9-15. Statesburg April 15. Occupation of Camden AprilStatesburg April 15. Occupation of Camden April 17. Boykins' Mills April 18. Denkins' Mills and Beech Creek, near Statesburg, April 19. Duty at Georgetown and Charleston, S. C., tiStatesburg, April 19. Duty at Georgetown and Charleston, S. C., till July. Mustered out July 10, 1865. Veterans and Recruits transferred to 54th New York Infantry. Regiment lost during service 7 Offi
12-April 3. Potter's Expedition to Camden, S. C., April 5-25. Dingle's Mills April 9. Statesburg April 15. Occupation of Camden April 17. Boykins' Mills April 18. Denkins' Mills and Beach Creek near Statesburg April 19. Return to Mount Pleasant April 28, thence moved to Charleston May 6 and to Columbia May 7, and garrison duty there till May 25. Duty in Fairfield, Newberry,March 10. Potter's Expedition to Camden, S. C., April 5-25. Operations about Sumpter and Statesburg April 9-15. Statesburg April 15. Occupation of Camden April 17. Boykin's Mills April Statesburg April 15. Occupation of Camden April 17. Boykin's Mills April 18. Denkin's Mills and Beech Creek, near Statesburg, April 19. Provost duty at Georgetown and at Charleston till July. Mustered out July 10, 1865. Recruits transferred to 25th Ohio InfantrStatesburg, April 19. Provost duty at Georgetown and at Charleston till July. Mustered out July 10, 1865. Recruits transferred to 25th Ohio Infantry. Regiment lost during service 3 Officers and 54 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 74 Enlisted men by disease. Total 133. 108th Ohio Regiment Infantry. Organized a
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States Colored Troops. (search)
r's Expedition April 5-25. Dingle's Mills April 9. Statesboro April 15. Occupation of Camden April 17. Boydkin's Mills April 18. Beach Creek near Statesburg and Denken's Mills April 19. Garrison duty at Charleston, Beaufort and Hilton Head, S. C., till August. Mustered out August 22, 1865. Regiment lost durpman, moved to Charleston April 7-9, thence march to join Potter at Nelson's Ferry April 11-18.) Potter's Expedition from Georgetown to Camden April 5-29. Statesburg April 15. Occupation of Camden April 17. Boykin's Mills April 18. Bradford Springs April 18 (right wing). Dingle's Mills April 19. Singleton's Plantation April 19. Beech Creek, near Statesburg, April 19. Moved to Charleston April 29, thence to Summerville May 7-8; to Branchville May 18; to Orangeburg May 25, and provost duty there till July 28. March to Winsboro July 28-August 3, and duty there till September. Moved to Charleston and muster out September 30, 18
egiments of the brigade bivouacked toward evening on the Statesburg road; the First Brigade moved on a mile or so farther, c 13th the One Hundred and Fifty-seventh New York went to Statesburg, thirteen miles distant, where it destroyed some stores.ifth Ohio was sent to gain the rear of the enemy on the Statesburg road. Throughout the 13th and 14th the remainder of the wing of the regiment, reconnoitred for two miles toward Statesburg, but found no enemy, and returned. Everything was reaevening. That morning the Twenty-fifth Ohio, ordered to Statesburg to await the division, encountered the enemy and drove tg was expected. Potter turned back from Camden toward Statesburg at 7 A. M. on the 18th. Our main body moved along the pnoon. Our road was through an open hilly country. Near Statesburg at a swamp and creek the enemy again fronted the divisioutenant Chickering, of the cavalry, was wounded. Beyond Statesburg the resistance was slight, the column proceeding until 1
m a platform upon the stockade, and artillery was posted on each corner. Lt.-Col. J. F. Iverson, of the Fifth Georgia, was commandant of the prison, and is favorably spoken of, so far as personal intercourse with the prisoners is concerned. But his subordinate, a red-headed fellow named Barrett, a lieutenant, was another fiend of the Wirz type, ferocious, brutal, and unmerciful. He made life a torment to all. Let us see what a resident of the South thought of Florence Prison:— Statesburg, South Carolina. October 12, 1864. dear sir,—Inclosed you will find an account of the terrible sufferings of the Yankee prisoners at Florence, South Carolina. In the name of all that is holy, is there nothing that can be done to relieve such dreadful suffering? If such things are allowed to continue, they will most surely draw down some awful judgment upon our country. It is a most horrible national sin, that cannot go unpunished. If we cannot give them food and shelter, for God's sake
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