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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 70 0 Browse Search
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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.17 (search)
only arrived either the same day they had left Ujiji with their caravan, or the day before. To mred in palms, on this hot noon, the village of Ujiji broods drowsily. No living thing can be seen ther it was true that there was a white man in Ujiji, who was just come from the countries west of een the two trading colonies of Unyanyembe and Ujiji, and because we brought news which concerned eanzibar; to Mahommed bin Sali, the Governor of Ujiji; to Abed bin Suliman, a rich merchant; to Mahour best, for this is a great day for us all in Ujiji. Yes, master. Sure to do that. I now tnd directs that goods should be sent to him at Ujiji; and, bidding his soul possess itself with pat bourn of that immense river. He arrives at Ujiji about the 1st of November, 1871, only to find ection with the Albert Nyanza, we set out from Ujiji, on the 27th December, 1871, and arrived at Unuld find my fear confirmed. Had I left him at Ujiji, I should have lost the chance of viewing him [19 more...]
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.18 (search)
l care, of a force often numbering two hundred and more, all fell on him. For his followers he had to take the part of doctor, and occasionally of nurse, sometimes including the most menial offices. Often he was prostrated by fever, and once, before finding Livingstone, he lay unconscious for a week. Problems of war and diplomacy confronted him. Shall he pay tribute, or resist? Shall he join forces with the friendly tribes, and fight the fierce and powerful Mirambo who blocks the way to Ujiji? He fights, and his allies fail him at the pinch; so then he resorts to a long flanking march through unknown country, and literally circumvents his foes. So, for over a year, every faculty is kept at the highest tension. Along with the developing effect of the experience, comes the solitary communing with Nature, which brings a spiritual exaltation. Then follows the companionship with Livingstone, a man of heroic and ideal traits, uniquely educated by the African wilds; these two lear
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.19 (search)
roes, but they exhibited truly heroic stuff while coping with the varied terrors of the hitherto untrodden, and apparently endless, wilds of broad Africa. They were sweet and sad moments, those of parting. What a long, long and true friendship was here sundered! Through what strange vicissitudes of life had they not followed me! What wild and varied scenes had we not seen together! What a noble fidelity these untutored souls had exhibited! The chiefs were those who had followed me to Ujiji in 1871: they had been witnesses of the joy of Livingstone at the sight of me; they were the men to whom I entrusted the safe-guard of Livingstone on his last and fatal journey; who had mourned by his corpse at Muilla, and borne the illustrious dead to the Indian Ocean. In a flood of sudden recollection, all the stormy period, here ended, rushed in upon my mind; the whole panorama of danger and tempest through which these gallant fellows had so staunchly stood by me — these gallant fellow
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
haracter of, 250; Stanley in search of, 251-263; found, 263-267; why he did not return of his own accord, 267-272; leaves Ujiji, 273; character of, 273-278, 281-284, 526; Stanley's parting from, 279, 280; death of, 280; feelings of Stanley at news ohears of a grey-bearded man, 259; pays heavy tribute to the natives, 259, 260; sees Lake Tanganyika, 261, 262; arrives at Ujiji, 262; finds Livingstone, 263-267; tells why Livingstone did not return of his own accord, 267-272; leaves Ujiji, 273; hisUjiji, 273; his observations on Livingstone's character, 273-278, 281-284; his parting from Livingstone, 279, 280; his return home, 286. Speaks before societies, 286, 287; hostility to, 286-289; received by Queen Victoria, 289-291; lectures in England and Ameri Tomasson, 169, 180, 184. Tremeirchion, 42, 51. Uganda, 309-313, 405. Uganda Mission, 318. Uhha, 259, 260. Ujiji, 262. Valencia, Stanley at, 243. Vasari, his Machiavelli, 463. Venezuela, and President Cleveland's message, 482