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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 404 0 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The newe Navigation and discoverie of the kingdome of Moscovia, by the Northeast, in the yeere 1553: Enter prised by Sir Hugh Willoughbie knight, and per fourmed by Richard Chancelor Pilot major of the voyage: Written in Latine by Clement Adams. (search)
in diet, and most patient in extremitie of cold, above all others. For when the ground is covered with snowe, and is growen terrible and hard with the frost, this Russe hangs up his mantle, or souldiers coate, against that part from whence the winde and Snowe drives, and so making a little fire, lieth downe with his backe towardsome blocke or stone his pillow: and as for his horse, he is as it were a chamberfellow with his master, faring both alike. How justly may this barbarous, and rude Russe condemne the daintinesse and nicenesse of our Captaines, who living in a soile & aire much more temperate, yet commonly use furred boots, and clokes? But thus mucdy and put it in a coffine or chest, and in the hand of the corps they put a litle scroule, & in the same there are these wordes written, that the same man died a Russe of Russes, having received the faith, and died in the same. This writing or letter they say they send to S. Peter, who receiving it (as they affirme) reades it, a
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Of the discipline of warre among the Russes. (search)
hort stirrop, after the maner of the Turks: They are a kinde of people most sparing in diet, and most patient in extremitie of cold, above all others. For when the ground is covered with snowe, and is growen terrible and hard with the frost, this Russe hangs up his mantle, or souldiers coate, against that part from whence the winde and Snowe drives, and so making a little fire, lieth downe with his backe towards the weather: this mantle of his serves him for his bed, wall, house and all: his drwere his wearie sides thus daintily stuffed: the hard ground is his feather bed, & some blocke or stone his pillow: and as for his horse, he is as it were a chamberfellow with his master, faring both alike. How justly may this barbarous, and rude Russe condemne the daintinesse and nicenesse of our Captaines, who living in a soile & aire much more temperate, yet commonly use furred boots, and clokes? But thus much of the furniture of their common souldiers. But those that are of higher degrees c
r churchyardes they erect a certaine house of wood, wherein they set up their bels, wherein sometimes they have but one, in some two, and in some also three. There is one use and custome amongst them, which is strange and rare, but yet it is very ridiculous, and that is this: when any man dyeth amongst them, they take the dead body and put it in a coffine or chest, and in the hand of the corps they put a litle scroule, & in the same there are these wordes written, that the same man died a Russe of Russes, having received the faith, and died in the same. This writing or letter they say they send to S. Peter, who receiving it (as they affirme) reades it, and by and by admits him into heaven, and that his glory and place is higher and greater then the glory of the Christians of the Latine church, reputing themselves to be followers of a more sincere faith and religion then they: they hold opinion that we are but halfe Christians, and themselves onely to be the true and perfect church:
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The letter of M. George Killingworth the companies first Agent in Moscovie, touching their interteinement in their second voyage. Anno 1555. the 27. of November in Mosco. (search)
trey and the marchants, and which way to save our selves best, and where to plant our houses, and where to seeke for wares: for the Mosco is not best for any kind of wares for us to buy, save onely waxe, which we cannot have under seven pence the Russe pound, and it lackes two ounces of our pound, neither will it be much better cheape, for I have bidden 6. pence for a pound. And I have bought more, five hundred weight of yarne, which stands mee in eight pence farthing the Russe pound one witRusse pound one with another. And if wee had received any store of money, and were dispatched heere of that we tary for, as I doubt not but we shalbe shortly (you know what I meane) then as soone as we have made sale, I doe intend to goe to Novogrode, and to Plesco, whence all the great number of the best tow flaxe commeth, and such wares as are there I trust to buy part. And feare you not but we will do that may be done, if God send us health, desiring you to prepare fully for one ship to be ready in the beginnin
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Certaine notes unperfectly written by Richard Johnson servant to Master Richard Chancelour, which was in the discoverie of Vaigatz and Nova Zembla, with Steven Burrowe in the Serchthrift 1556. and afterwarde among the Samoedes, whose devilish rites hee describeth. (search)
the tent. Thereupon I asked them that sate by me what it was that fell into the water that stoode before him. And they answered me, that it was his head, his shoulder and left arme, which the line had cut off, I meane the knot which I sawe afterwarde drawen hard together. Then I rose up and would have looked whether it were so or not, but they laid hold on me, and said, that if they should see him with their bodily eyes, they shoulde live no longer. And the most part of them can speake the Russe tongue to bee understood: and they tooke me to be a Russian. Then they beganne to hallow with these wordes, Oghaoo, Oghaoo, Oghaoo, many times together. And as they were thus singing & out calling, I sawe a thing like a finger of a man two times together thrust through the gowne from the Priest. I asked them that sate next to me what it was that I sawe, and they saide, not his finger; for he was yet dead: and that which I saw appeare through the gowne was a beast, but what beast they knew no
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of the foresaid M. Stephen Burrough, An. 1557. from Colmogro to Wardhouse, which was sent to seeke the Bona Esperanza, the Bona Confidentia, and the Philip and Mary, which were not heard of the yeere before. (search)
that we were faine to beare roome to seeke a harbour, where we found good harbour for all windes, and the least 7. fadome water betweene S. Johns Islands, and the maine. After that we came to an ancre, we tooke the latitude, which was 68. degrees 1. minute, after noone, the winde at North with plentie of snowe. At a West sunne there came aboord us certaine Lappians in a boate, to the number of sixeteene persons, and amongst them there were two wenches, and some of them could speake the Russe tongue: I asked them where their abiding was, and they tolde mee that there was a companie or heard of them, to the number of 100. men, besides women and children, but a litle from us in the river Iekonga. They tolde me that they had bene to seeke meate among the rockes, saying, If wee get no meate, wee eate none. I sawe them eate rocke weedes as hungerly, as a cowe doeth grasse when shee is hungrie. I sawe them also eate foules egges rawe, and the yong birdes also that were in the egges.
that we were faine to beare roome to seeke a harbour, where we found good harbour for all windes, and the least 7. fadome water betweene S. Johns Islands, and the maine. After that we came to an ancre, we tooke the latitude, which was 68. degrees 1. minute, after noone, the winde at North with plentie of snowe. At a West sunne there came aboord us certaine Lappians in a boate, to the number of sixeteene persons, and amongst them there were two wenches, and some of them could speake the Russe tongue: I asked them where their abiding was, and they tolde mee that there was a companie or heard of them, to the number of 100. men, besides women and children, but a litle from us in the river Iekonga. They tolde me that they had bene to seeke meate among the rockes, saying, If wee get no meate, wee eate none. I sawe them eate rocke weedes as hungerly, as a cowe doeth grasse when shee is hungrie. I sawe them also eate foules egges rawe, and the yong birdes also that were in the egges.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter of Thomas Alcocke to the worshipfull Richard Gray, and Henrie Lane Agents in Moscovia from Tirwill in Polonia , written in Tirwill the 26. of Aprill 1558. (search)
woulde be a meane that I might have the remaynder of such thinges as were taken from me restored unto me againe. Hee made me answere, that I might thanke God that I escaped with my head, and that if ever there came any more of us through the land, they should not so doe. The weeke before Easter they delivered mee my Corobia againe with all thinges that were therein. They tooke from mee in money nine Hungers gylderns in golde, five shillings foure pence in Lettoes money, fourtie Altines in Russe money, whereof twentie and more were for tokens, halfe an angell and a quarter of Master Doctour Standishes, with his golde ring. Your two pieces of money (Master Gray) that you sent to your wife and daughter, with my two pieces of Boghary money. Of all this I had eight Hungers gilderns delivered mee the thirde weeke of mine imprisonment to paye for my charges, which stoode mee in a Doller a weeke. So that at the day of my deliverie I had but three gyldernes left me. For the rest I made a su
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A Letter of the Moscovie companie to their Agents in Russia , Master Henrie Lane, Christopher Hudson, and Thomas Glover sent in their seventh voyage to Saint Nicholas with three ships, the Swallowe, the Philip and Marie, and the Jesus the fifth of May, 1560. (search)
or the Countrey, and to sell them at such reasonable prices as wee have done. If this shoulde not come to passe, wee might be out of hope of doing any good by the trade there: but that we have a further hope of some good trade to be found out by Master Antonie Jenkinson: by reason we doe perceive by your letters, that raw silke is as plentifull in Persia, as flaxe is in Russia : beside other commodities that may come from thence. Wee understand by your letters that you be at a point with the Russe for the Waxe, Tallow, and Traine oyles that he shipped the last yere for 311 robles 20 altines, which is well: although much be not gotten by it, but because they should not understand our reckonings. We much marvel what you mean to buy Seale skins and tanne them. All that you have sent in times past lie here unsold, and will yeelde no money. If you send 100 of them tawed with the haire on, they will bee solde, or else not. In our shippe we will send you such things as you write to have for
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, From thence we fell with an Island, called Kettelwicke. This coast from Rost unto Lofoot lieth North and (search)
ry time he drinketh or tasteth of a dish of meate he blesseth himselfe. Many other things I sawe that day, not here noted. The 4 of January, which was Twelftide with them, the Emperour, with his brother and all his nobles, all most richly apparelled with gold, pearles, precious stones, and costly furres, with a crowne upon his head, of the Tartarian fashion, went to the Church in procession, with the Metropolitan, and divers bishops and priests. That day I was before the Emperour again in Russe apparell, and the Emperour asked if that were not I, and his Chancelor answered yea. Then he bad me to dinner: then came he out of the church, and went with the procession upon the river, being all frozen, and there standing bare headed, with all his Nobles, there was a hole made in the ice, and the Metropolitan hallowed the water with great solemnitie and service, and did cast of the sayd water upon the Emperors sonne and the Nobility. That done, the people with great thronging filled pots
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