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A remarkable fact in naval warfare. [From the New York Times.] The report of the capture of the rebel iron-clad ram Tennessee in Mobile bay must form one of the most remarkable chapters in naval warfare. It is no ordinary sort of sea monitor that could bear the concentrated attack of thirteen vessels of war, six of them iron-clad, with an armament of two hundred guns, and yet come out of the engagement with a few splinters detached from her inner casting to mark the damage in her interior. The Tennessee lay in the rear of our fleet after the forts had been passed on the morning of the 5th of August; and of fourteen vessels, at Admiral Farragut's disposal for the attack, all were perfectly sound and uninjured except the Tecumseh, which had been sunk by a torpedo, when the order was given shortly after 8 o'clock to bout ship and give battle to the ram. A signal was given to all the fleet not only to commence the attack with guns, but to run her down at full speed. The Monongahel
The Daily Dispatch: January 19, 1865., [Electronic resource], Runaway.--one thousand Dollars Reward. (search)
Sinking of a Yankee gunboat in Mobile bay. --The New Orleans (Yankee) Era announces the loss of the Yankee gunboat Narcissus, William G. Jones commanding. The letter detailing the event is dated Mobile bay, December 8th and says: "On the night of December 7th she went in on picket duty to the obstructions opposite the city of Mobile. At 7 o'clock P. M. she came to anchor within three hundred yards of the obstructions, in plain view of the rebel rams, picket boats, etc. The night waMobile bay, December 8th and says: "On the night of December 7th she went in on picket duty to the obstructions opposite the city of Mobile. At 7 o'clock P. M. she came to anchor within three hundred yards of the obstructions, in plain view of the rebel rams, picket boats, etc. The night was clear, and with a beautiful moon. At 10:20 P. M. came up a terrific squall from northward. The captain being apprehensive of his vessel grounding, as she was only in eight feet water, the steamer got under way and steamed a mile further out, and came to anchor in nine and a half feet water. The vessel was to an anchor in ten minutes, the wind blowing strong from the northward, and a considerable swell, when all of a sudden a terrific explosion occurred, which lifted the vessel all of five f
January 24.--10. P. M. --Gold active and strong on the call, opening at 206, closing on call at 205 1-2. After call, sold at 203 3-4, closing at 204 5-8. Arrival of the Confederate cotton at New York. The steamship Atlanta, from Mobile bay on January 16th, has arrived with one thousand bales of cotton from the Confederate Government, to purchase blankets, clothing, etc., for Confederate prisoners. The cotton is in charge of Captain Noyes, of General Granger's staff, and was delivered to him on January 13th by the Confederate authorities outside their obstructions in Mobile bay from their steamer Waverly. Butler as a Duellist — he Wants to know whether he is a gold or Bold robber. In the Yankee House, on Tuesday,-- Mr. Brooks said that not long ago, in the course of his remarks, he had occasion to speak of a certain Major-General as a gold robber. But in some of the prints he was represented as saying "bold robber." No doubt this was a misunderstanding.
The Herald has advices from New Orleans to the 19th instant. The property of John Slidell and Judah P. Benjamin has been condemned as forfeited to the United States Government in the District Court of New Orleans. The Herald correspondent in Mobile bay writes: One of our monitors to-day made an important reconnaissance up Mobile bay. The strength, as well as the position, of several of the enemy's most important works was discovered. The rebels allowed the monitor to go where she Mobile bay. The strength, as well as the position, of several of the enemy's most important works was discovered. The rebels allowed the monitor to go where she pleased without firing up on her. Deserters and refugees from Mobile are hourly picked up by the fleet and brought to headquarters. They state that the rebels are convinced that an advance will be made immediately upon the city by a powerful combined force of the army and navy. The authorities commanding the city appear determined to make a desperate and stubborn resistance. The Gold Market. Gold continues to decline in New York. On the 27th it opened at 155 3-4, and closed at 1
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