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Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 29, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 19, 1865., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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, 165. Mechanicsville, Va., 153. Milliken's Bend, Ark., 319. Mill Spring, Ky.. 42. Mission Ridge, Tenn., 441. Mobile Bay, Ala., 651. Murfreesboroa (or Stone River), Tenn., 273. Nashville, Tenn., 273. Newbern, N. C., 78. Newmarket. Va., 5 Donaldsonville, 102; returns to New Orleans, 102; at the capture of Port Hudson, 332; assails Forts Morgan and Gaines, Mobile bay, 651. Farrand, Comr., surrenders to Rear-Admiral Fletcher on the Tombigbee river, 754. Fayetteville, N. C., taken; 88; bombardment and surrender of, 88 to 97. Fort Smith, Ark., Gen. Thayer leaves, 552. forts Morgan and Gaines, Mobile bay, Farragut assails, 651; Page and Anderson surrender, 653. Fort Steedman, Va., Rebel attack on, 728. Fort Sumter, ., at Perryville, 220. Mitchellsville, Morgan's raid on, 271. Mix, Col. S. H., killed at Petersburg, Va., 585. Mobile Bay, the fight in, 641; the outer defenses of, 649; map of the defenses of, 650. Mobile, Ala., preparations for attack o
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 13: aggregate of deaths in the Union Armies by States--total enlistment by States--percentages of military population furnished, and percentages of loss — strength of the Army at various dates casualties in the Navy. (search)
T. A. Craven, commander, went into action at Mobile Bay, it struck a torpedo and sank instantly. Th 5 Hartford Farragut's flag-ship. Drayton Mobile Bay 25 28 -- 53 Aug. 5 Brooklyn Alden Mobile Mobile Bay 11 43 -- 54 Aug. 5 Lackawanna Marchand Mobile Bay 4 35 -- 39 Aug. 5 Oneida Mullany Mobile Bay 8 30 -- 38 Aug. 5 Monongahela Strong Mobile Bay -- 6 -- 6 Aug. 5 Metacomet Jouett Mobile Bay 1 2 -- 3 Aug. 5 Ossipee Le Roy Mobile Bay 1 7 -- 8 Aug. 5 Richmond Jenkins Mobile Bay -- 2 Mobile Bay -- 2 -- 2 Aug. 5 Galena Wells Mobile Bay -- 1 -- 1 Aug. 5 Octorara Greene Mobile Bay 1 10 -- 11 Mobile Bay 1 10 -- 11 Aug. 5 Kennebec McCann Mobile Bay 1 6 -- 7 Aug. 5 Tecumseh Blown up by torpedoes. Craven MobilMobile Bay -- -- -- 79 1865.               Jan. 15 Fleet Porter Fort Fisher 74 289 20 This loss April-- Althea Sunk by a torpedo. Boyle Mobile Bay 2 2 -- 4 April-- Sciota Sunk by a torptorpedo. Magune Mobile Bay 4 6 -- 10 April-- Ida Sunk by a torpedo. Kent Mobile Bay 2 3 -- 5 [9 more..
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
ter 6 22 1 29 May 31 Boat Crews, C. S. N. Pelot Water Witch 6 12   18 June 19 Alabama Semmes Kearsarge 9 21 Drowned.10 40 Aug. 6 Tennessee Buchanan Mobile Bay 2 10   12 Aug. 6 Selma   Mobile Bay 5 10   15 But any recital of casualties or battles would fail to convey a proper idea of the extent and activity ofMobile Bay 5 10   15 But any recital of casualties or battles would fail to convey a proper idea of the extent and activity of the Confederate Navy. Important and successful operations were carried on by privateers and swift cruisers flying the Confederate flag. These cruisers inflicted an immense damage on the commerce of the United States. The Confederate steamer Alabama captured or destroyed 69 vessels; Hist. Confederate Navy: Scharf. the Floridd 23, 424 Missouri regiments, tabulation of, with loss in each 516 Missouri regiments, small enrollment of 520 Missouri regiments, State Militia 521 Mobile Bay, casualties in Navy at 539 Morning reports 34 Mortally wounded or killed in action, number of 526 Mortality in Department of the Gulf 468 Murdered,
ing out A prize.--The correspondent of the N. Y. Times, writing from the U. S. steamer Niagara, off Mobile, June 6, gives the following account of an exciting exploit:-- A daring and successful exploit occurred last evening, with three of the Niagara's boats, fully armed and manned, under the command of Lieut. John Guest, with Midshipmen O'Kane, Swann, and Casey, as aides. During the day we noticed a large schooner go alongside of the wreck of a large English ship, near the entrance of Mobile Bay, where she erected shears and commenced work. We supposed they were mounting a battery on the hulk, and resolved to put a stop to it at all hazards. During the evening three of our largest boats were got out in readiness, filled with about 40 men, and taken in tow by the gunboat Mount Vernon. When within a mile, and in shoal water, we out oars and shoved off, making a sweep directly under the guns of Fort Gaines, and succeeded in cutting off the desired prize. While this manoeuvre was
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 20 (search)
iration of service; and this is the only reason why I want reenforcements. We have killed, crippled, and captured more of the enemy than we have lost by his acts. On the 12th of August I heard of the success of Admiral Farragut in entering Mobile Bay, which was regarded as a most valuable auxiliary to our operations at Atlanta; and learned that I had been commissioned a major-general in the regular army, which was unexpected, and not desired until successful in the capture of Atlanta. Thes all these matters were in progress, the reports of the past campaign were written up and dispatched to Washington, and our thoughts began to turn toward the future. Admiral Farragut had boldly and successfully run the forts at the entrance to Mobile Bay, which resulted in the capture of Fort Morgan, so that General Canby was enabled to begin his regular operations against Mobile City, with a view to open the Alabama River to navigation. My first thoughts were to concert operations with him, e
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 22: campaign of the Carolinas. February and March, 1866. (search)
do not know but the first failure has been as valuable a success for the country as the capture of Fort Fisher, Butler may not see it in that light. Ever since you started on the last campaign, and before, I have been attempting to get something done in the West, both to cooperate with you and to take advantage of the enemy's weakness there — to accomplish results favorable to us. Knowing Thomas to be slow beyond excuse, I depleted his army to reenforce Canby, so that he might act from Mobile Bay on the interior. With all I have said, he had not moved at last advices. Canby was sending a cavalry force, of about seven thousand, from Vicksburg toward Selma. I ordered Thomas to send Wilson from Eastport toward the same point, and to get him off as soon after the 20th of February as possible. He telegraphed me that he would be off by that date. Hie has not yet started, or had not at last advices. I ordered him to send Stoneman from East Tennessee into Northwest South Carolina, to
camp of the Massachusetts 5th, June 17, P. 125 Forney, J. W., poem To Ellsworth, P. 89 For we're a band of niggers, P. 115 Foreigners, rapid enlistments of, D. 42 Fort Barrancas, Florida, seized, D. 14 Fort Brown surrendered, D. 19 Fort Caswell seized, D. 12 Fort Corcoran, flag-raising at, P. 149 Fort Johnson seized, D. 12 Fort Kearney, Kansas, seized, D. 17; guns at, spiked, D. 66 Fort Macon, N. C., seized, D. 9 Fort Morgan, Mobile Bay, seized, D. 10 Fort Moultrie evacuated, D. 6; Doc. 8; taken possession of by rebels, D. 7, 9; to attack Fort Sumter, P. 12; is repaired by the rebels, D. 13; damage done at the bombardment of, D. 85; Doc. 82 Fort Pickens, Fla., supplies cut off from, D. 19; Doc. 42; incidents at, P. 43; notices of, D. 20, 48, 56, 72, 77, 95; a southern opinion of tho condition of, April 23, P. 60; a novel plan to capture, P. 101; the saver of, in prison, P. 144; reinforcement of, D. 42; Doc. 16
tioned places burning fiercely, and mostly in ashes. Without communicating with the Fort, I proceeded to the town of Pensacola, where I found that Gen. Arnold had already sent Capt. Jackson, of the army, in the schooner Wood, to call upon the town to surrender. I sent for the Mayor on board the Harriet Lane, who promised that the citizens would behave themselves peacefully. I found that the rebels evacuated the place on hearing that our steamers, the day before, were going to run into Mobile Bay, and the squadron and mortar flotilla would soon follow them. A thousand rebels were encamped five miles outside of Mobile. They had destroyed everything that time would permit. Fort Barrancas, the Marine Barracks, Muster-Office in the yard, one new stone building, the smithery, I believe, and the shears, are still in a fair state of preservation. The yard was so hot that I did not go into it. Gen. Arnold having no steamer at command, and no means of transportation, I placed the Har
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 3.-attack on the defences of Mobile. (search)
attack on the defences of Mobile. Report of rear-admiral Farragut. flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864. sir: I have the honor to report to the Department that this morning I entered Mobile Bay, passing between Forts Morgan and Gaines, and encountering the rebel ram Tennessee and gunboats of the enemy, namely, Selma, Morgan, and Gaines. The attacking fleet was under way by fo Your despatch of the fifth instant, stating that you had, on the morning of that day, entered Mobile Bay, passing between Forts Morgan and Gaines, and encountering and overcoming the rebel fleet, I h levelled his guns against the flag which it was his duty to have defended. The possession of Mobile Bay, which you have acquired, will close the illicit traffic which has been carried on by running nks, and those of the Government and country. Very respectfully, etc., Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Rear-Admiral David G. Farragut, Commanding West Gulf Blockading Squadron, Mobile Bay.
G. Farragut. U. S. Flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 12, 1864. sir: I had the honor to fag-Ship Hartford. U. S. flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 8, 1864. sir: I respectfully beg leder J. H. Strong. U. S. S. Monongahela, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864. sir: I have the honor to rmmanding Monongahela. U. S. S. Monongahela, Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864. sir: I have to report thatn, Mobile Bay, Ala. U. S. steamer Seminole, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864. sir: I have to report thatT. H. Stevens. U. S. Monitor Winnebago, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864. To Rear-Admiral D. G. FarraguG. H. Perkins. U. S. Monitor Chickasaw, Mobile Bay, Aug. 7, 1864. sir: I have the honor to sebel ram Tennessee. flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, August 6, 1864. gentlemen: You will pleaconduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay, on the morning and forenoon of August fifth. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, Mobile Bay. Report of casualties in the fleet in th[136 more...]
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