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Loss of the monitor Tecumseh. Report of rear-admiral D. G. Farragut. flag-ship Hartford, W. G. B. Squadron, Mobile Bay, August 27, 1864. sir: I have the honor to forward herewith (marked No. 1) a copy of a report made to me by Acting Masters C. F. Langley and Gardner Cottrell, two of the survivors of the iron-clad Tecumseh, and in which are given the names of six men who were saved in the same boat, namely: S. S. Shinn, Gunner's Mate; Jno. Gould, Quarter-Gunner; Frank Commins, seaman; Richard Collins, seaman; and Peter Parks, seaman. These officers are certainly in error in their statement that a row of buoys stretched from the shore a distance of one to two hundred yards. We now know, that the channel adjacent to the shore was entirely clear of torpedoes, and that the latter were placed between the two large buoys, to which I have referred in my reports. In addition to the persons named in this report as saved, the boat from the Metacomet, under Acting Ensign Nields
ell as for military purposes. The country was in the midst of a presidential campaign. The opposition to Lincoln's reelection was strong, and for many weeks it was believed on all sides that his defeat was inevitable. At least, the success of the Union arms in the field was deemed essential to Lincoln's success at the polls. Grant had made little progress in Virginia and his terrible repulse at Cold Harbor, in June, had cast a gloom over every Northern State. Farragut was operating in Mobile Bay; but his success was still in the future. The eyes of the supporters of the great war-president turned longingly, expectantly, toward General Sherman and his hundred thousand men before Atlanta. Do something — something spectacular — save the party and save the country thereby from permanent disruption! This was the cry of the millions, and Sherman understood it. But withal, the capture of the Georgia city may have been doubtful but for the fact that at the critical moment the Confede
ell as for military purposes. The country was in the midst of a presidential campaign. The opposition to Lincoln's reelection was strong, and for many weeks it was believed on all sides that his defeat was inevitable. At least, the success of the Union arms in the field was deemed essential to Lincoln's success at the polls. Grant had made little progress in Virginia and his terrible repulse at Cold Harbor, in June, had cast a gloom over every Northern State. Farragut was operating in Mobile Bay; but his success was still in the future. The eyes of the supporters of the great war-president turned longingly, expectantly, toward General Sherman and his hundred thousand men before Atlanta. Do something — something spectacular — save the party and save the country thereby from permanent disruption! This was the cry of the millions, and Sherman understood it. But withal, the capture of the Georgia city may have been doubtful but for the fact that at the critical moment the Confede
d Stoneman's Cavalry; Confed., Army of Tennessee, Gen. J. E. Johnston, commanding; Hardee's Corps, Hood's Corps, Wheeler's Cavalry. Fort Morgan fallen after a stubborn defense Among the decisive events of 1864 was the Union victory of Mobile Bay, August 23d. These smoke-blackened walls of the citadel, Fort Morgan, its shattered face, are silent witnesses to the stubborn nature of the defense, and the folds of the American flag in the distance proclaim the success of Farragut's attack.st 2, 1864: Green Springs, W. Va. Union, 153d Ohio; Confed., troops of Gen. J. H. Morgan's command. Losses: Union, 1 killed, 5 wounded, 90 missing; Confed., 5 killed, 22 wounded. August 5-23, 1864: forts Gaines and Morgan, Mobile Bay, Ala. Union, Thirteenth Corps and Admiral Farragut's fleet of war vessels; Confed., fleet commanded by Admiral Buchanan and land forces under Gen. D. H. Maury. Losses: Union, 145 killed, 170 wounded; Confed., 12 killed, 20 wounded,
ells, yet every morning they were roaring defiance again at the attacking fleet. No Federals set foot here until the little garrison of 230 men were confronted by Sherman's army of 100,000 and stormed on December 13, 1861. Fort Morgan, Mobile Bay, Alabama Fort Morgan, on the right of the entrance to Mobile Bay, was one of the strongest of the old brick forts. By August, 1864, it had been greatly strengthened by immense piles of sandbags, covering every portion of the exposed front towarMobile Bay, was one of the strongest of the old brick forts. By August, 1864, it had been greatly strengthened by immense piles of sandbags, covering every portion of the exposed front toward the neck of the bay. The Fort was well equipped with three tiers of heavy guns, one of the guns at least, of the best English make, imported by the Confederates. exposed to attack by mining. These underground defenses included, besides the necessary pits, over two and one-half miles of drifts or tunnels. In addition to the countermining at Petersburg, the engineer troops were used to strengthen the fortifications and to build a branch railroad to facilitate the delivery of supplies. Dur
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
ed and warned off the coasts. The steam frigate Brooklyn, under Commander C. H. Poor, at the same time proclaimed the blockade at the mouth of the Mississippi, and Lieutenant D. D. Porter, in the Powhatan, did the same thing at the entrance to Mobile Bay. The menace had begun. By July, every port had been informed. Europe, especially England, was at first inclined to laugh at the attempt to close these profitable markets. It was indeed at the outset, in view of the bigness of the task, aped by Admiral Dahlgren, who hauled down his flag two years later at Washington. In the East Gulf, the command fell successively on Admirals Lardner, Bailey, and Stribling. In the West Gulf, Farragut retained command until after the capture of Mobile Bay, in 1864, when Admiral Thatcher succeeded him. The monotony of this continual and watchful existence was broken by the frequent chasing and occasional capture of blockade-runners. The log-books of this adventurous fleet of marine speculator
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The birth of the ironclads (search)
g these was the Saugus ; and one of her sister-ships, the Canonicus, gave her name to the class. The most famous of the nine was the Tecumseh. Her bold commander, T. A. N. Craven, in an effort to grapple with the Confederate ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, ran through the line of torpedoes and lost his ship, which had fired the first two guns in Farragut's brilliant battle. Ericsson did not approve of the principle of the double-turreted monitor. In the Saugus is well exemplified his principlend shrapnel. General Green, who behaved with the greatest gallantry, had his head blown off. After an hour and a half the Confederates withdrew from the unequal contest, with a loss of over four hundred dead and wounded. The Osage was sent to Mobile Bay in the spring of 1865 and was there sunk by a submarine torpedo on March 29th. A veteran of the rivers — the Pittsburg The Pittsburg was one of the seven ironclads that Eads completed in a hundred days. She first went into action at For
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
e. He trusted himself to her in another memorable engagement when, lashed to her shrouds, he steamed past the forts in Mobile Bay on August 5, 1864, recking not of the Confederate torpedoes liberally planted in the harbor. January 20th, that muose bearded and weather-beaten faces give evidence of service in the old navy still remain. After the great triumph in Mobile Bay, Farragut said of these men: I have never seen a crew come up like ours. They are ahead of the old set in small arms, This scene on the vessel's deck was photographed shortly after she had been raised after being sunk by a torpedo in Mobile Bay. Two days after the Federal flag was raised over the courthouse in Mobile, the Sciota, while hurrying across the bay, rng shot. She survived to run the batteries at Vicksburg with Farragut. She exchanged a few shells with Fort Morgan in Mobile Bay while on blockade duty there, August 30, 1862. The Hartford after passing the forts a second time: the altered appe
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The actions with the forts (search)
The Hartford This vivid photograph, taken in Mobile Bay by a war-time photographer from New Orleans, was e steamed in line to the attack of Fort Morgan at Mobile Bay on the morning of August 5, 1864. Every man was on the deck of the Hartford, after the victory in Mobile Bay, of August, 1864. When Gustavus V. Fox, Assistan Farragut shot for shot: interior of Fort Morgan, Mobile Bay, in 1864 From these walls the gunners of Brigahough the other fortifications at the entrance to Mobile Bay surrendered the day after the battle, it took mor The Confederate ironclad ram Tennessee Mobile Bay, on the morning of August 5, 1864, was the arena eeds of bravery are to be mentioned in telling of Mobile Bay, much credit must be given to the small Confederae Carolinas. The general-in-chief suggested that Mobile Bay would be the best point to move from if the city that had operated against the forts around lower Mobile Bay had been detached from his command. He decided t
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The Confederate cruisers and the Alabama : the Confederate destroyers of commerce (search)
en released by the British authorities there, her armament was again put aboard her and she began her career as the Florida. She had been out but five days when yellow fever broke out on board. It reduced the working force to one fireman and four deck-hands. Maffit, himself stricken, ran into Cardenas, but was soon ordered by the Cuban authorities to bring his ship to Havana. Maffit determined to escape. On Sept. 4, 1862, he took the Florida boldly through the blockading squadron into Mobile Bay. The vessel was refitted, and on the night of Jan. 15, 1863, Captain Maffit ran out with her and got safely to sea. He continued to command the cruiser on her adventurous voyages until the latter part of 1864, when his health was so broken that he was relieved. In January, 1865, he took the blockade-runner Owl out from Wilmington and over the bar near Fort Caswell, the very night that the forts surrendered to the Federal fleet. Maffit arrived at Bermuda in time to stop the sailing of fi
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