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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 296 8 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 64 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 54 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 48 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 44 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 24 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 18 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Mobile Bay (Alabama, United States) or search for Mobile Bay (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 3 document sections:

Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 16: career of the Anglo-Confederate pirates.--closing of the Port of Mobile — political affairs. (search)
t of Mobile to be closed, 439. the defenses of Mobile, 440. naval battle in Mobile Bay, 441. destruction of the Confederate squadron. 442. capture of Forts Gaineor that purpose, Admiral Farragut appeared Aug. 5, 1864. off the entrance of Mobile Bay, full thirty miles below the City, with a fleet of eighteen vessels, four of anted upon Dauphin Island for the purpose of co-operating. the entrance to Mobile Bay is divided by Dauphin Island, making two passages; the easterly one four milelowed the Brooklyn and her tethered companion, the Octorara, to Entranoe to Mobile Bay. lead the wooden ships. When that vessel was within range of the Fort, whoseFarragut's work was not done. There stood the forts guarding the entrance to Mobile Bay, almost unharmed, with full armaments and garrisons. These must be captured iladelphia, Pittsburg, Baltimore, Newport (Kentucky), St. Louis, New Orleans, Mobile Bay, Pensacola, Hilton Head, and New Berne. mentioned in note 1, on page 395.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 17: Sherman's March through the Carolinas.--the capture of Fort Fisher. (search)
are, whence she first set forth. There she was dismantled, and left to repose near League Island, a short distance below Philadelphia, where she was accidentally set on fire, and was destroyed, on Sunday, the 16th of December, 1866. and monitors. ordered to join the Army of the Potomac. See page 292. This put an end to the expedition, and postponed the capture of Wilmington. In the succeeding summer, when preparations were begun for Farragut's attack on the forts at the entrance to Mobile Bay, See page 439. similar arrangements were made for reducing the forts at the entrance to the Cape Fear River. So early as August, armored and unarmored gun-boats began to gather in Hampton Roads; and in October full fifty war-vessels were there, under the command of Admiral Porter, including the New Ironsides and several monitors. Meanwhile, Governor Andrew had been to Washington, and laid before the Government September, 1864. Mr. Kidder's plan, which was again approved. That gentle
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 19: the repossession of Alabama by the Government. (search)
troops at New Orleans, 508. advance of the National forces, 509. attack on Spanish Fort, on Mobile Bay, 510. fortifications at Blakely, 511. battle of Blakely, 512. evacuation of Mobile by the Can of campaign for the winter and spring of 1865. The capture of the forts at the entrance to Mobile Bay Aug., 1864. was a necessary preliminary movement. Had Farragut then known how weakly Mobile nt page. besides several which guarded the entrances to the rivers that flow into the head of Mobile Bay. Along the shore, below the city, were Batteries Missouri, Mound and Buchanan. Just below the latter, and terminating the middle line of fortifications, was Fort Sidney Johnston. In the harbor were two floating batteries and four stationary ones, named, respectively, Tighlman, Gladden, Cae received but two shots as she went by, from batteries there, the vessels of war being yet in Mobile Bay. The Webb was pursued by gun-boats from above, and was hurrying toward the Gulf, when she enc