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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Letters concerning the voyage of M. John Newbery and M. Ralph Fitch, made by the way of the Levant Sea to Syria , and overland to Balsara, and thence into the East Indies, and beyond, In the yeere 1583. (search)
alsara, and from thence of force I must goe to Ormus for want of a man that speaketh the Indian tonn Newberie. Master Newberie his letter from Ormus, to M. John Eldred and William Shals at Balsary commendations, &c. From out of the prison in Ormuz , this 21 of September, 1583. His second Lety commendations, &c. From out of the prison in Ormuz , this 24 day of September, 1583. Yours,John Ne written from Goa. MY last I sent you was from Ormuz , wherby I certified you what had happened there were two causes which moved the captaine of Ormus to imprison us, &. afterwards to send us hithed moreover, that the cause why the captaine of Ormus did send me for Goa, was, for that the Viceroyhings I have solde very well, both here and at Ormus in prison, notwithstanding the captaine willedf all this was Michael Stropene, which came to Ormus not woorth a penie, and now hath thirtie or fo 14 dayes, and then we imbarked our selves for Ormuz , where we arrived the fifth of September, and [7 more...]
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Another letter of Master Newberie to the aforesaide M. Poore, written from Babylon. (search)
ies are woorth, I would not doubt to make a very good profite of this voiage hither, and to Balsara, and so by Gods helpe there will be reasonable profite made of the voiage. But with halfe money & halfe commoditie, may be bought here the best sort of spices, and other commodities that are brought from the Indies, and without money there is here at this instant small good to be done. With Gods helpe two dayes hence, I minde to goe from hence to Balsara, and from thence of force I must goe to Ormus for want of a man that speaketh the Indian tongue. At my being in Aleppo I hired two Nazaranies, and one of them hath bene twise in the Indies, and hath the language very well, but he is a very lewde fellow, and therefore I will not take him with me. Here follow the prices of wares as they are worth here at this instant. CLOVES and Maces, the bateman, 5 duckats. Cynamom 6 duckats, and few to be gotten. Nutmegs, the bateman, 45 medins, and 40 medins maketh a duckat. Ginger 40 medin
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Master Newberie his letter from Ormus, to M. John Eldred and William Shals at Balsara. (search)
Master Newberie his letter from Ormus, to M. John Eldred and William Shals at Balsara. RIGHT welbeloved and my assured good friends, I heartily commend me unto you, hoping of your good healths, &c. To certifie you of my voiage, after I departed from you, time wil not permit: but the 4 of this present we arrived here, & the 10 day I with the rest were committed to prison, and about the middle of the next moneth, the Captaine wil send us all in his ship for Goa. The cause why we are taken, as e. All those commodities that I brought hither, had beene very well sold, if this trouble had not chanced. You shall do well to send with all speed a messenger by land from Balsara to Aleppo, for to certifie of this mischance, although it cost thirtie or forty crownes, for that we may be the sooner released, and I shalbe the better able to recover this againe which is now like to be lost: I pray you make my hearty commendations, &c. From out of the prison in Ormuz , this 21 of September, 1583.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, His second Letter to the foresaid Master John Eldred and William Shales. (search)
His second Letter to the foresaid Master John Eldred and William Shales. THE barke of the Jewes is arrived here two daies past, by whom I know you did write, but your letters are not like to come to my handes. This bringer hath shewed me here very great courtesie, wherfore I pray you shew him what favor you may. About the middle of the next moneth I thinke we shall depart from hence, God be our guide. I thinke Andrew will goe by land to Aleppo, wherein I pray you further him what you may: but if he should not goe, then I pray you dispatch away a messenger with as much speede as possible you may. I can say no more, but do for me as you would I should do for you in the like cause, and so with my very hearty commendations, &c. From out of the prison in Ormuz , this 24 day of September, 1583. Yours,John Newberie.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, His third Letter to Maister Leonard Poore, written from Goa. (search)
written from Goa. MY last I sent you was from Ormuz , wherby I certified you what had happened thers, for all nations doe, and may come freely to Ormuz , as Frenchmen, Flemmings, Almains, Hungarians,e were two causes which moved the captaine of Ormus to imprison us, &. afterwards to send us hithehey say. But of these things I did not know at Ormus: and in the ship that we were sent in came the chiefest justice in Ormus, who was called Aveador generall of that place, he had beene there threed moreover, that the cause why the captaine of Ormus did send me for Goa, was, for that the Viceroyhings I have solde very well, both here and at Ormus in prison, notwithstanding the captaine willedbringer to receive them, who came with me from Ormus, and put them into an house which he had hiredf all this was Michael Stropene, which came to Ormus not woorth a penie, and now hath thirtie or foubles that have chanced since mine arrivall in Ormus, this bringer is able to certifie you. I mind [1 more...]
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A Letter written from Goa by Master Ralph Fitch to Master Leonard Poore abovesaid. (search)
ht daies, that which I did eate was very small, so that if we had stayed two dayes longer upon the water, I thinke I had died: but comming to Balsara, presently I mended, I thanke God. There we stayed 14 dayes, and then we imbarked our selves for Ormuz , where we arrived the fifth of September, and were put in prison the ninth of the same moneth, where we continued untill the 11 of October, and then were shipt for this citie of Goa in the captaines ship, with an 114 horses, and about 200 men : aey without the licence of the Viceroy. It doth spite the Italians to see us abroad: and many marvell at our delivery. The painter is in the cloister of S. Paul, and is of their order, and liketh there very well. While we were in prison, both at Ormuz and here, there was a great deale of our goods pilfered and lost, and we have beene at great charges in gifts and otherwise, so that a great deale of our goods is consumed. There is much of our things which wil sell very well, & some we shall get
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of M. Ralph Fitch marchant of London by the way of Tripolis in Syria , to Ormus, and so to Goa in the East India, to Cambaia, and all the kingdome of Zelabdim Echebar the great Mogor, to the mighty river Ganges, and downe to Bengala, to Bacola, and Chonderi, to Pegu , to Imahay in the kingdome of Siam , and backe to Pegu , and from thence to Malacca, Zeilan, Cochin, and all the coast of the East India: begunne in the yeere of our Lord 1583, and ended 1591, wherein the strange rites, maners, and customes of those people, and the exceeding rich trade and commodities of those countries are faithfully set downe and diligently described, by the aforesaid M. Ralph Fitch. (search)
of London by the way of Tripolis in Syria , to Ormus, and so to Goa in the East India, to Cambaia, M. John Newberie marchant (which had beene at Ormus once before) of William Leedes Jeweller, and Jat trade of spices and drugges which come from Ormus. Also there is great store of wheate, ryce, anewith they serve Babylon and all the countrey, Ormus, and all the partes of India. I went from Basora to Ormus downe the gulfe of Persia in a certaine shippe made of boordes, and sowed together withthe best pearles which be round and Orient. Ormus is an Island in circuit about five and twentierse commodities for the streits of Mecca , for Ormus, and other places, and these be shippes of theer many shippes come from all partes of India, Ormus, and many from Mecca : heere be manie Moores a a passage to Balsara fifty dayes. From Goa to Ormus is foure hundred leagues. Here I thought goom Cambaia. Now to returne to my voyage; from Ormus I went to Balsara or Basora, and from Basora t[2 more...]
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The report of John Huighen van Linschoten concerning M.Newberies and M. Fitches imprisonment, and of their escape, which happened while he was in Goa. (search)
e moneth of December, Anno 1583, there arrived in the towne and Iland of Ormus foure English men, which came from Aleppo in the countrey of he company of English men that are resident in Aleppo, to see if in Ormus they might keepe any factours, and so traffique in that place, like as also the Italians do, that is to say, the Venetians which in Ormus, Goa, and Malacca have their factours, and traffique there, aswell for One of these English men had bene once before in the sayd towne of Ormus, and there had taken good information of the trade, and upon his adr to runne into any danger for the same. They being thus arrived in Ormus, hired a shoppe, and beganne to sell their wares: which the ItalianMeneses, telling him that there were certaine English men come into Ormus, that were sent onely to spie the countrey; and sayd further, that the wayes, trades, and voyages of the countrey, betweene Aleppo and Ormus, and of all the ordinances and common customes which they usually h
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of M. John Eldred to Trypolis in Syria by sea, and from thence by land and river to Babylon and Balsara. 1583. (search)
th is of gallies which are about five and twenty or thirty very faire and furnished with goodly ordinance. To this port of Balsara come monethly divers ships from Ormuz , laden with all sorts of Indian marchandise, as spices, drugs, Indico and Calecut cloth. These ships are usually from forty to threescore tunnes, having their plaon worke belonging to these vessels, save only their ankers. From this place six dayes sailing downe the gulfe, they go to a place called Baharem in the mid way to Ormus: there they fish for pearles foure moneths in the yere, to wit, in June, July, August, and September. My abode in Balsara was just sixe moneths, during which time I received divers letters from M. John Newbery from Ormus, who as he passed that way with her Majesties letters to Zelabdim Echebar king of Cambaia, & unto the mighty emperour of China, was traiterously there arrested, and all his company, by the Portugals, and afterward sent prisoner to Goa : where after a long and cruell impris
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The money and measures of Babylon, Balsara, and the Indies, with the customes, &c. written from Aleppo in Syria , An. 1584. by M. Will. Barret. (search)
and Ormuz . ORMUZ : The weight, measure, and money currant in the kingdom of Ormuz : SPICES and drugs they weigh by the bar, and of every sort of goods the weight isrotiloes and a halfe. Touching the money of Ormuz , they bargaine in marchandize at so many lecheres from Balsara or Babylon, there is found in Ormuz 125 codes and two third parts. The other m Note that al such ships as lade horses in Ormuz for Goa or any other place of India, lading 10e from all custome, because they were laden in Ormuz to pay custome in Goa. Moreover, if the horses Venetians pay nothing thereof. Note yt in Ormuz they abate tare of all sorts of commodities, bondon weight 132 li. English, as the weight of Ormuz . All the marchandize, spices and drugs, are s any part of the Indies. But if they come from Ormuz to Goa with horses, they are not subject to pa thereof for any other place, or returne it to Ormuz , they pay the custome outward, although they c[23 more...]
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