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lsara weigh 17 ounces and a halfe sottile Venetian, and of Aleppo drams 150, ut supra. The fraight of the barkes from Ormuz to Balsara, I would say from Balsara to Ormuz , they pay according to the greatnesse thereof. To say, for cariage of 10 cOrmuz , they pay according to the greatnesse thereof. To say, for cariage of 10 cares 180 larines, those of 15 cares 270 larines, those of 20 cares 360 larines, those of 30 cares 540 larines. Note that a cara is 4 quintals of Balsara. They pay also to the pilot of the barke for his owne cariage one care, and to all the rest of th partie, with the condition that they lade not aboord one rotilo more then the fraight, under paines that finding more in Ormuz , it is forfeit, and besides that to pay the fraight of that which they have laden. And in this accord it behoveth to e other honest man (whereof there are but few) for they are the worst people in all Arabia . And this diligence must be put in execution, to the end the barks may not be overladen, because they are to passe many sands betwixt Balsara and Ormuz .
ORMUZ : The weight, measure, and money currant in the kingdom of OrOrmuz : SPICES and drugs they weigh by the bar, and of every sort of goods the weight is different. Torotiloes and a halfe. Touching the money of Ormuz , they bargaine in marchandize at so many lechees of Aleppo. The Venetian mony is worth in Ormuz larines 88 per 100 meticals, & the roials are , and make them so many larines in the king of Ormuz his mint, whereby they cleare 2 per 100, and ser Venetian money nor roials run as currant in Ormuz , per advise. The measure of Ormuz is of 2Ormuz is of 2 sorts, the one called codo which increaseth upon the measure of Aleppo 3 per 100, for bringing 100 le wares from Aleppo to Ormuz , it is found in Ormuz to be 103 codes. Also these measures of Ormuz da, which is, that one bringing his goods into Ormuz , with purpose to send ye same further into Ind Venetians pay nothing thereof. Note yt in Ormuz they abate tare of all sorts of commodities, b[9 more...]
ne, and of London weight 132 li. English, as the weight of Ormuz . All the marchandize, spices and drugs, are sold by this roues make a quintall, and the roue is 32 rotiloes, as in Ormuz . There is also another weight which they call Marco , wound 17 pikes 7 eight parts, and bringing 100 codes from Ormuz to Goa, there is found but 93 codes and one fourth part. here is also the vare in Goa, which is just as the vare of Ormuz , and therewith they measure onely things that are of smallThere is also a sort of seraphins of gold of the stampe of Ormuz , whereof there are but fewe in Goa, but being there, they e custome they pay in this order. Comming with a ship from Ormuz to Goa without horses, they pay 8 in the 100 whether they ch come from any part of the Indies. But if they come from Ormuz to Goa with horses, they are not subject to pay any custom or any part thereof for any other place, or returne it to Ormuz , they pay the custome outward, although they could not sel
COCHIN. The weight, measure, and money, currant in Cochin. ALL the marchandise which they sell or buy within the sayd citie, they bargaine for it at so many serafines per quintal, which is 128. rotilos of just weight with ye quintall & rotilo of Goa and Ormuz : advertising that there are divers sorts of bars according to the sorts of commodities, and in traffiquing, they reason at so much the bar. Note that there are bars of 3 quintals & 3 quintals and halfe, and 4 quintals. They abate a used tare of all marchandize, according to the sort of goods, and order taken for the same. The measure of Goa and Cochin are all one. The money of Cochin are all the same sorts which are currant in Goa, but the duckat of gold in value is 10 tangas of good money. The custome of Cochin as well inward as outward for all strangers, is eight in the hundred, but those that have bene married foure yeere in the countrey pay but foure in the hundred, per adviso.
aid armes, and 2 of these make a challaine. The Challaine is of tinne with the said armes, and 40 of these make a tanga of Goa good money, but not stamped in Malacca. There is also a sort of silver money which they call Patachines, and is worth 6 tangas of good money, which is 360 reyes, and is stamped with two letters, S. T. which is S. Thomas on the one side, and the armes of Portugall on the other side. There is also a kind of mony called cruzados stamped with the armes of Portugall, & is worth 6 tangas good mony, the larines are every 9 of them worth 2 cruzados, which is 12 tangas good money, and these larines be of those which are stamped in Balsara and Ormuz . The roials of 8 they call Pardaos de Reales, and are worth 7 tangas of good money. The custome of Malacca is 10 in the 100 as wel inward as outward, and those which pay the custome inwards, if in case they send the same goods for any other place within terme of a yeere and a day, pay no custome for the same.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A note of charges from Aleppo to Goa, as foloweth. (search)
mme. For custome of clothes at Corno , the summe of med. per somme. For 3 dishes raisins, and 20 pound of sope, med. 26. For fraight from Balsara to Ormus, according to the greatnesse, as in this booke appeareth. For custome in Ormus, as is abovesaid in this booke. For fraight from Ormus to Goa, as is in this boo summe of med. per somme. For 3 dishes raisins, and 20 pound of sope, med. 26. For fraight from Balsara to Ormus, according to the greatnesse, as in this booke appeareth. For custome in Ormus, as is abovesaid in this booke. For fraight from Ormus to Goa, as is in this booke shewed. For custome in Goa, as is abovesaid. summe of med. per somme. For 3 dishes raisins, and 20 pound of sope, med. 26. For fraight from Balsara to Ormus, according to the greatnesse, as in this booke appeareth. For custome in Ormus, as is abovesaid in this booke. For fraight from Ormus to Goa, as is in this booke shewed. For custome in Goa, as is abovesaid.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The times or seasonable windes called Monsons, wherein the ships depart from place to place in the East Indies. (search)
The ships depart about the tenth of August for Ormus: albeit Secutra is an Island and hath but few ri. The first monson from Goa for Ormus. The shippes depart in the moneth of October rsia. The second monson from Goa to Ormus. The ships depart about the 20 of Januarie pa, Entremonson. The third monson from Goa to Ormus. The ships depart betwixt the 25 of March, ans for Chaul and Goa. The ships depart from Ormus for Chaul, and Goa in the moneth of September,ormer monson. The third monson from Ormus for Chaul, and Goa. The third monson the ships depart from Ormus, for Chaul and Goa, betwixt the first and 15 of April, and they saile witt then to depart that monson, but to winter in Ormus because of the winter. The first 20 ofAprill. The second monson from Ormus for Zindi. The ships depart betwixt the 10 an15 of November. The monson from Ormus to Bengala. The ships depart betwixt the 15 a[9 more...]
The monson from Secutra for Ormus. The ships depart about the tenth of August for Ormus: albeit Secutra is an Island and hath but few ships, which depart as abovesaid. The monson from Secutra for Ormus. The ships depart about the tenth of August for Ormus: albeit Secutra is an Island and hath but few ships, which depart as abovesaid.
The first monson from Goa for Ormus. The shippes depart in the moneth of October from Goa, for Ormus, passing with Easterly windes along the coast of Persia. The first monson from Goa for Ormus. The shippes depart in the moneth of October from Goa, for Ormus, passing with Easterly windes along the coast of Persia.
The second monson from Goa to Ormus. The ships depart about the 20 of Januarie passing by the like navigation and windes as in the first monson, and this is called of the Portugals and Indians, Entremonson.
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