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The third monson from Goa to Ormus. The ships depart betwixt the 25 of March, and 6 of Aprill, having Easterly windes, till they passe Secutra, and then they find Westerly windes, and therfore they set their course over for the coast of Arabia , till they come to Cape Rasalgate and the Straight of Ormus, and this monson is most troublesome of all: for they make two navigations in the heigth of Seylan, which is 6 degrees and somewhat lower.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The first monson from Ormus for Chaul and Goa. (search)
The first monson from Ormus for Chaul and Goa. The ships depart from Ormus for Chaul, and Goa in the moneth of September, with North and Northeast windes. The first monson from Ormus for Chaul and Goa. The ships depart from Ormus for Chaul, and Goa in the moneth of September, with North and Northeast windes.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The second monson from Ormus for Chaul and Goa. (search)
The second monson from Ormus for Chaul and Goa. The second monson is betwixt the five and twentie and last of December, with like winds as the former monson.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The third monson from Ormus for Chaul, and Goa. (search)
The third monson from Ormus for Chaul, and Goa. The third monson the ships depart from Ormus, for Chaul and Goa, betwixt the first and 15 of April, and they saile with Southeast windes, East and Northeast windes, coasting upon the Arabia side from Cape Mosandon unto Cape Rasalgate, and having lost the sight of CapOrmus, for Chaul and Goa, betwixt the first and 15 of April, and they saile with Southeast windes, East and Northeast windes, coasting upon the Arabia side from Cape Mosandon unto Cape Rasalgate, and having lost the sight of Cape Rasalgate, they have Westerly windes, and so come for Chaul and Goa, and if the said ships depart not before the 25 of April, they are not then to depart that monson, but to winter in Ormus because of the winter. theast windes, coasting upon the Arabia side from Cape Mosandon unto Cape Rasalgate, and having lost the sight of Cape Rasalgate, they have Westerly windes, and so come for Chaul and Goa, and if the said ships depart not before the 25 of April, they are not then to depart that monson, but to winter in Ormus because of the winter.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The first monson from Ormus for Zindi. (search)
The first monson from Ormus for Zindi. The ships depart for Ormus betwixt the 15 and 20 ofAprill. The first monson from Ormus for Zindi. The ships depart for Ormus betwixt the 15 and 20 ofAprill.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The second monson from Ormus for Zindi. (search)
The second monson from Ormus for Zindi. The ships depart betwixt the 10 and 20 of October for Zindi from Ormus. The second monson from Ormus for Zindi. The ships depart betwixt the 10 and 20 of October for Zindi from Ormus.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The monson from Ormus for the red sea. (search)
The monson from Ormus for the red sea. The ships depart from Ormus betwixt the first and last of Januarie. The monson from Ormus for the red sea. The ships depart from Ormus betwixt the first and last of Januarie.
The monson from Ormus to Bengala. The ships depart betwixt the 15 and 20 of June, and goe to winter at Teve and depart thence about the 15 of August for Bengala.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A description of a Voiage to Constantinople and Syria , begun the 21. of March 1593. and ended the 9. of August, 1595. wherein is shewed the order of delivering the second Present by Master Edward Barton her majesties Ambassador, which was sent from her Majestie to Sultan Murad Can, Emperour of Turkie. (search)
st all which I had often conference with a Jew, who by reason of his many yeeres education at Safet a place in Judea neere Jerusalem, where they study the Rabbines with some other arts as they thinke good, as also for his travels into Persia and Ormus, he seemed to be of good experience in matters abroad, who related unto me such conference as he had with a Baniane at Ormus, being one of the Indians inhabiting the countrey of Cambaia. This Baniane being a Gentile had skill in Astronomie, as maOrmus, being one of the Indians inhabiting the countrey of Cambaia. This Baniane being a Gentile had skill in Astronomie, as many of that nation have, who by his books written in his owne tongue and Characters, could tell the time of Eclipses both of Sunne and Moone, with the Change and Full, and by judgement in Astrologie gave answere to any question demanded. Being asked concerning his opinion in religion, what he thought of God? He made answere, that they held no other god but the sun, (to which planet they pray both at the rising and setting) as I have seene sundry doe in Aleppo: his reason was drawen from the ef
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Certaine reports of the province of China learned through the Portugals there imprisoned, and chiefly by the relation of Galeotto Perera, a Gentleman of good credit, that lay prisoner in that Countrey many yeeres. Done out of Italian into English by Richard Willes. (search)
imprisonment. The Mogores be in like maner white, and heathen, we are advertised that of one side they border upon these Tartars, and confine with the Persian Tartars on the other side, whereof wee sawe in them some tokens, as their maner of clothes, and that kinde of hat the Saracens doe weare. The Moores affirmed, that where the king lyeth, there be many Tartars and Mogores, that brought into China certaine blewes of great value: all we thought it to be Vanil of Cambaia wont to be sold at Ormus. So that this is the true situation of that Countrey, not in the North-parts, as many times I have heard say, confining with Germanie. As for the Brames we have seene in this city Chenchi certaine men & women, amongst whom there was one that came not long since, having as yet her haire tied up after the Pegues fashion: this woman, and other mo with whom a black Moore damsel in our company had conference, and did understand them wel ynough, had dwelt in Pegu . This new come woman, imagin
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