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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 35 5 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 20 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 17 13 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 4 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 6 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Peoria (Illinois, United States) or search for Peoria (Illinois, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.47 (search)
viving Confederate officer from Virginia. Major-General Dabney Herndon Maury, the oldest Confederate officer of his rank in Virginia, died at 5 o'clock Thursday morning, January 11, 9000, at the home of his son, Mr. Dabney H. Maury, Jr., in Peoria, Ill., in the 78th year of his age. General Maury had been in feeble health ever since going to Peoria from Richmond, a year ago. Last summer he was quite ill there, but his strong constitution enabled him to rally. Death came unexpectedly, as gPeoria from Richmond, a year ago. Last summer he was quite ill there, but his strong constitution enabled him to rally. Death came unexpectedly, as gently and as peacefully as a tender benediction, after a long life of active and honored usefulness. General Maury's wife has been dead a number of years. He leaves a son, as above, who married Mary daughter of the beloved Dr. James Brown McCaw, of Richmond, and two daughters—one, Mrs. Rose, wife of Robert Pollard, residing in Houston, Texas, and the other, Mrs. Sue Mason, wife of James M. Halsey, in Philadelphia. These ladies are both distinguished as educators and are well-known contribut
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), In the Confederate service. (search)
State that the United States now has the most efficient national militia in the world. In 1885, General Maury was appointed United States envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary to the United States of Colombia by Mr. Cleveland. He remained at Bogota until after the election of Mr. Harrison. Made his home in Richmond. Since his return from the United States of Colombia, General Maury had resided with relatives in this city and with his son, Mr. Dabney H. Maury, Jr., at Peoria, Ill. Few men and women in Richmond are unfamiliar with his rather small, spare, but stiffly erect figure. All who knew him loved him. General Maury angry was something few persons ever saw. He was the soul of good fellowship. He was a man with a heart—a big one in a small body. He was an inveterate story-teller. His long life and his varied experiences prevented his stories from ever growing tiresome. Offer from the Lottery. His frankness and his honesty were probably his most striki
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The funeral. (search)
re he was born and much of his earlier life was spent. The funeral services were held here. The remains of the distinguished Virginian and Confederate soldier reached this city Saturday morning at 8:20 o'clock. Mr. Dabney H. Maury, Jr., of Peoria, Ill., the only son of General Maury, and with whom he made his home and at whose residence he died, accompanied the remains to Richmond. His daughter, Mrs. James M. Halsey, of Philadelphia, was also here, but Mrs. Pollard, his other daughter, who ed memory of General Maury. At a meeting of the Executive Committee of the Southern Historical Society, held January 17, 1900, the following action was taken: Dabney Herndon Maury—hero and scholar. Died at the home of his son in Peoria, Illinois, January 11, 1900, Dabney Herndon Maury, the eldest surviving Major-General of the Confederate States Army, and who was born at Fredericksburg, Virginia, May 21, 1822. Drawing his life-springs from lines which have shed lustre on the anna