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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the defeat of Gen. Lee's Army at the battle of Gettysburg-opinions of leading Confederate soldiers. (search)
rthern States at all, I entirely dissent. The Trans-Mississippi Department was then practically severed from the Confederacy by the investment of Vicksburg and Port Hudson. To have confined our efforts east of the Mississippi to an entirely defensive policy would have exposed us to a certain, though slow process of exhaustion. Wa--of the mouth of the St. John's river, Key West and Pensacola, in Florida--of the lower Mississippi, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and Memphis, with Vicksburg and Port Hudson besieged, the fall of which latter towns was all that was necessary to give complete possession of the Mississippi river--of West Tennessee, the northern portioo rigidly blockaded and patroled by war vessels, that it was a mere chance when the blockade was evaded. The large army under Grant, besieging Vicksburg and Port Hudson, could very readily have been brought against one or the other of our armies in the field on the fall of the beleaguered towns, which was a mere question of tim
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Our Gettysburg series. (search)
Historical Society: Dear sir: I am writing the account of the battle of Gettysburg, and consider that chapter as the most important, the most difficult to write of the whole work which I have undertaken. I share the opinion of those who think that the Confederate cause was not a lost cause from the beginning; that it may have been successful; and therefore I seek with great care to find out why it did not succeed. The battle of Gettysburg, coupled with the surrender of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, is, in that respect, the turning point of the war. The Army of Northern Virginia, when it invaded the Northern States was more powerful than it had ever been before. The issue of the invasion was disastrous for the Confederate cause. This is a mere fact which neither a Southerner nor a Northerner can dispute. Therefore, I must show the causes of this disaster without any disparagement for the army or its leader, just as I pointed out the causes of the ill successes of McClellan and
, with very heavy loss.--Cincinnati Commercial. A reconnoitring expedition, consisting of two companies of infantry, a battery of two guns, and a small troop of cavalry, under the command of Col. Thomas, Eighth Vermont, left St. Charles Court-House, La., and proceeded to Bonnet Carre where they dispersed, after a short skirmish, a force of rebel guerrillas, and captured over fifteen head of oxen, horses, and mules, which were designed for the use of the rebel army. The expedition was entirely successful, and returned without losing a man.--New Orleans Delta, Sept. 1. The Union gunboat Anglo-American, under the command of Captain Riley, left New Orleans and proceeded up the Mississippi River on a reconnoitring expedition, as far as Vicksburgh. When opposite Port Hudson the Anglo-American received the fire of twenty-two guns. She was hit sixty or seventy times, but though completely riddled, proceeded on her course. The result of the reconnaissance was entirely successful.
oint in the vicinity of Front Royal, from which the positions of the rebel Generals Longstreet and Hill were discovered.--Baltimore American. General Butler, commanding department of the Gulf, issued an order enforcing the confiscation act in the district of Lafourche, comprising all the territory in the State of Louisiana, west of the Mississippi River, except the parishes of Plaquemines and Jefferson.--(Doc. 41.) John B. Villipigue, Brigadier-General in the rebel army, died at Port Hudson.--The draft was again postponed in the State of New York.--The Forty-third, Forty-fourth, and Forty-sixth regiments of Massachusetts volunteers left Boston for the seat of war. A skirmish took place at the house of Captain Eversoll, on the North Fork of the Kentucky River, in Perry County, Ky., between two companies of Union troops under Captains Morgan and Eversoll, and a numerous body of rebel guerrillas, resulting in a retreat of the latter, leaving three of their number dead on t
as this day made by a strong force of Union troops, under the command of General Ferry, to the Blackwater River, Va. The rebels were discovered, in great strength, all along the river in the vicinity of Zuni. After an artillery fight of three or four hours, in which the rebels were driven back, the National force returned to their camp at Suffolk.--(Doc. 71.) This afternoon the gunboat Essex, accompanied by the transport Winona, while making a reconnoissance of the fortifications at Port Hudson, was fired upon by a party of rebel artillerists, under the command of Captain Boone, and compelled to retire.--About day-break this morning, a large body of General Stuart's rebel cavalry entered Dumfries, Va., and captured thirty-five National pickets and sutlers. After destroying the telegraph and several Government wagons, they retreated, and the town was soon after occupied by the Union troops, under Brigadier-General Steinwehr.--A skirmish took place on the Kinston road, about four
n, a brother to the rebel General John H. Morgan, with others, was taken prisoner. The One Hundred and Thirty-third New York regiment, accompanied by a company of cavalry, went from Plaquemine to Rosedale, La., a distance of nearly thirty miles, to break up a rebel camp, supposed to be situated there. They found the rebels had gone, but some medicines, nineteen bales of cotton, and several horses were taken, together with four prisoners. A portion of the party went three miles above Port Hudson, on the opposite side of the river.--Louisville Journal. A body of seven hundred rebel guerrilla cavalry, under the leadership of Colonel Leroy Cluke, made a thieving expedition into Kentucky. They first went to Winchester, thence to Mount Sterling, Straw Hill, and Hazel Green, robbing and destroying property of every description. A large amount of government property was destroyed at Paris, in order to prevent it from falling into the hands of the rebels. They were pursued by a
March 9. A small rebel force was this day captured six miles below Port Hudson, together with the signal book containing the signals used in the rebel army.--A large number of vagrant negroes were arrested in New Orleans, La. The schooner Lightning, from Nassau, N. P., laden with dry goods, sugar and coffee, was this day captured by the United States steamer Bienville, thirty miles south of Hilton Head, S. C. The British iron-screw steamer Douro, of Liverpool, laden with cotton, turpentine, and to-bacco, from Wilmington, N. C., was this day captured in latitude 33° 41‘ N., longitude 77° 2 W., by the United States gunboat Quaker City. To-day a skirmish took place near Bolivar, Tenn., between a detachment of National troops and a band of guerrillas, in which the latter were routed and eighteen of their number captured. James Louis Petigru died at Charleston, S. C., in the seventy-fourth year of his age. Mr. Petigru was an avowed and active opponent of the nul
er General Pettigrew. After a bombardment of four hours duration, a fleet of gunboats appeared opposite the city, and opening on the rebels dispersed them in great haste.--(Doc. 137.) Brigadier-General B. S. Roberts, in command of the defences of the Upper Potomac, issued orders regulating the trade between Maryland and Virginia.--The Loyal National League, of New York City, was inaugurated at the Academy of Music in that city.--New York Evening Post. The rebel batteries at Port Hudson, La., were attacked by the Union fleet, under Admiral Farragut; but, after a terrible bombardment of several hours' duration, they were compelled to retire without reducing the rebel stronghold.--(Doc. 138.) A force of National cavalry, under the command of Colonel Robert H. G. Minty, returned to Murfreesboro, Tenn., after a successful reconnoissance, of eleven days duration, into the surrounding country. They dispersed several squads of guerrillas, captured fifty prisoners, forty mule
horses, and equipment. The rebels were composed of parts of Morgan's and McCoun's men. Among the prisoners were Captain Bondy, of the Eighteenth Tennessee, and a lieutenant of Morgan's cavalry. A still-house, containing forty casks of liquors, was destroyed. One man was wounded. General Mitchell's command made the march of fifty-five miles in twelve hours.--National Intelligencer. The United States gunboats Hartford, Switzerland, and Albatross, which had been blockading the mouth of the Red River, on the Mississippi, since the first instant, got under way early this morning, and proceeded down to Bayou Sara, where they stopped, seized upon and threw into the river ten thousand sacks of corn, after which they proceeded to Port Hudson, coming to anchor five miles above the rebel batteries.--Gold sold in Richmond, Va., at four hundred per cent premium.--The National steamer Fox (Whittemore) was captured by a party of rebels at Pass a L'Outre, Mississippi River.--Mobile Tribune.
nia: The President and the General-in-Chief have just returned from the army of the Potomac. The principal operations of General Hooker failed, but there has been no serious disaster to the organization and efficiency of the army. It is now occupying its former position on the Rappahannock, having recrossed the river without any loss in the movement. Not more than one third of General Hooker's force was enaged. General Stoneman's operations have been a brilliant success. Part of his force advanced to within two miles of Richmond, and the enemy's communications have been cut in every direction. The army of the Potomac will speedily resume offensive operations. The ship Crazy Jane, was captured in Tampa Bay, Fla., by the gunboat Tahoma.--Earl Van Dorn, the rebel General, was shot and instantly killed this day by Dr. Peters, of Maury County, Tenn. To-night, a fleet of National gunboats and mortar-schooners, commenced the attack on the rebel batteries at Port Hudson, Miss.
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