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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 10, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) or search for Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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n skillful marksmen, possessing cannon and small arms in abundance, and determined that the ing shall not be done such is precisely the condition and feeling of the country from Cairo to the Belize. The people are brave and enterprising; they possess arms and ammunition in abundance; they hate the Yankees as the Devil is supposed the hate holy water, and they are determined not to allow the river to be navigated by their trading boats. What good, then, will the capture of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, and of every other strong place on the Mississippi, do the Yankees? They are fighting they say, for the free navigation of the Mississippi. Does this advance the cause for which they are fighting? Are they any nearer their object now then they were when they first drew the sword? Do they mean to carry on trade in iron clad ships of war? Are there to be no more flat boats, no more high pressure steamboats, no more rafts, no more of any of the cheap and time honored vehicles in which
ick Taylor have been made to cross over the Mississippi and do a great many things which they never have done — and have been rapidly moved from one point to another at a great distance in an incredibly short space of time. Magruder one day is marching upon New Orleans, when it is not probable he is outside of the boundaries of Texas. Everything is received with doubt that comes from that direction. The last report that Dick Taylor had crossed the Mississippi and was joining Gardner at Port Hudson, had completely routed Banks, and marched on to reinforce Johnston of course must be received with the incredulity that the questionable ter of everything by telegraph from that quarter is so well calculated to inspire. But all at once the telegraphers from the North appear to be ambitions of outstripping their contemporaries of the far South, and with one bound go a long way ahead of them. We are informed from Martinsburg that Gen. Lee, by an adroit move, has captured forty thousan
Co., where he captured 1,200 mules, come 100 prisoners, and some arms. The same paper states that he levied a tax of $350,000 upon the city of York, giving twenty days time in which to pay. Some $10,000 had been collected by the citizens. The Sun, of the 2d given information that Pemberton attacked Grant at Vicksburg and defeated him, and that Grant endeavored to escape, when Johnston fell upon him and out his army to pieces. The Sun says that Banks has arrived at New Orleans from Port Hudson with only 5,000 men the remnant of his army. I have seen neither of the papers, but gather my information from those who have real them. It is reported here to day that on yesterday ten of imboden's cavalry went into Mercersburg, Pa., and whilst quietly riding through the streets, they were tired upon by some of the citizens and seven of them killed. Imboden to day goes to demand satisfaction for the outrage. This is the second case in which I have heard of the people in Pennsylva
look in vain. Home, loved wife and children, O. Lord, when will I be permitted to see them again in a land of peace, and liberty, and speech, and action? June 16.--We got a Memphis paper of the 11th, from which we learn of the attack on Port Hudson. Our boys are greatly rejoined at the success of the brave defenders of Port Hudson. All in good spirits; firing about as usual. June 21.--Not much of interest the last few days. The firing yesterday morning, from 4 to 10 o'clock A. M.Port Hudson. All in good spirits; firing about as usual. June 21.--Not much of interest the last few days. The firing yesterday morning, from 4 to 10 o'clock A. M., was the heaviest that we had during the siege. June 25.--I have Gen. Pemberton's pass, and shall leave the city to morrow morning.--Sharpshooting and cannonading have been going on about as usual for several days.-- Some of our boys have been doing some pretty gallant little deeds within the last two weeks. Small parties have charged outside of our works, killed and captured a few Yankees, and on one occasion a regiment of Georgians captured and hauled in a wagon, which proved to be loa
g beyond Clinton report that the enemy are burning every dwelling they pass. A fight is hourly expected here. [Fifth Dispatch.] Jackson, July 8. --Dispatches from Panola the 7th, state that General Holmes attacked Helena on the 4th and captured three batteries. Reinforcements for the enemy arrived and five gunboats drove our forces back. Our loss was five hundred. Heavy firing was heard next day. [Sixth Dispatch] Natchez, July 6. --A transport, towing two barges loaded with coal, passed down this morning. An officer on General Smith's staff reports that Gen. Price was ordered on Sunday, the 28th, to take Helena, Arkansas. He moved immediately. Nothing from Port Hudson. All quiet. The very Latest. Jackson, July 9, 11 A. M. --The enemy are advancing rapidly on the Clinton read. Our cavalry have been skirmishing with them three miles out and are gradually falling back. Our forces have formed a line of battle to receive them.
From Port Hudson. Natchez, July 6. --A gentleman from the vicinity of Port Hudson reports that movements there indicate that Banks is about to raise the siege. All the flats, etc., were burned at Natchez by order of Col. Smith. The river is rising and plenty of rain has fallen here. The crops are fine, the weather pleasant, and the people confident. The thermometer indicate of degrees. From Port Hudson. Natchez, July 6. --A gentleman from the vicinity of Port Hudson reports that movements there indicate that Banks is about to raise the siege. All the flats, etc., were burned at Natchez by order of Col. Smith. The river is rising and plenty of rain has fallen here. The crops are fine, the weather pleasant, and the people confident. The thermometer indicate of degrees.