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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 17, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 1 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Index, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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come upon the rear of the main body of Adams's command. The enemy having a battery of artillery, it was his intention to attack us in front and rear at Union Church, about daylight in the morning, but the appearance of Captain Trafton with a force in his rear, changed his purpose, and turning to the right he took the direct road toward Port Gibson. From this point I made a strong demonstration toward Fayette, with a view of creating the impression that we were going toward Port Gibson or Natchez, while I quietly took the opposite direction, taking the road leading southeast to Brookhaven, on the railroad. Before arriving at this place, we ascertained that about five hundred citizens and conscripts were organized to resist us. We charged into the town, when they fled, making but little resistance. We captured over two hundred prisoners, a large and beautiful camp of instruction, comprising several hundred tents and a large quantity of quartermaster's and commissary stores, arms, a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 9.97 (search)
sent to its defense. Those troops would necessarily come from Bragg. My judgment was overruled, however, and the troops under my command were dissipated over other parts of the country where it was thought they could render the most service. Four thousand were sent to Banks, at New Orleans; five thousand to Schofield, to use against Price, in Arkansas; the Ninth Corps back to Kentucky; and finally, in August, the whole of the Thirteenth Corps to Banks. I also sent Ransom's brigade to Natchez, to occupy that point, and to relieve Banks from guarding any part of the river above what he had guarded before the fall of Port Hudson. Ransom captured a large amount of ammunition and about five thousand beef cattle that were crossing the river going east for the rebel armies. At this time the country was full of deserters from Pemberton's army, and it was reported that many had also left Johnston. These avowed they would never go back to fight against us again. Many whose homes were
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.14 (search)
h, Washington, and New Berne in North Carolina; Beaufort, Folly and Morris islands, Hilton Head, and Port Royal, in South Carolina, and Fort Pulaski in Georgia; Fernandina, St. Augustine, Key West, and Pensacola in Florida. The remainder of the Southern territory, an empire in extent, was still in the hands of the enemy. Sherman, who had succeeded me in the command of the Military Division of the Mississippi, commanded all the troops in the territory west of the Alleghanies and north of Natchez, with a large movable force about Chattanooga. His command was subdivided into four departments, but the commanders all reported to Sherman, and were subject to his orders. This arrangement, however, insured the better protection of all lines of communication through the acquired territory, for the reason that these different department commanders could act promptly in case of a sudden or unexpected raid within their respective jurisdictions, without waiting the orders of the division com
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 20: events West of the Mississippi and in Middle Tennessee. (search)
ht be captured by the navy. It was expected that batteries would be found on the bluffs at Port Hudson, Elles's Cliffs, Natchez, and Grand Gulf, but no serious resistance was offered at those places. Williams landed below Elles's Cliffs, and made rear to capture a battery on their crown, but the troops had fled with their guns. There were no signs of opposition at Natchez, but fearing it at Grand Gulf, the troops landed, took possession of the town, and, in retaliation for being fired upon,April, 1866. these Cliffs, on the east bank of the river, are at a sharp turn in the stream, about eighteen miles below Natchez. They are of yellow clay, and rise from one hundred and fifty to two hundred feet above the water. (the elder havinerrillas fired upon him. The little town was destroyed in consequence. Because of the fiendish act of armed citizens of Natchez in firing on a boat's crew who went on shore to procure ice for sick men, that city was bombarded by the Essex, set on f
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 22: the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
ttack and destroy the steamer City of Vicksburg, that lay under the guns of the batteries at the city, and then to push farther down the river. After receiving a terrible cannonade while attacking the steamer, she passed on down, and just below Natchez destroyed three others. She ran a few miles up Red River, and, returning, repassed the Vicksburg batteries. On the 10th of February 1863. she was started on another raid down the river, to capture Confederate transports, pass the Port Hudsoy through that town to Westfield and Hazelhurst. They halted at Gallatin, where they captured a 32-pounder rifled Parrott gun, with fourteen hundred pounds of gunpowder, on the way to Grand Gulf. They pushed on to Union Church, a little behind Natchez, where they had a skirmish, when, turning back, they struck the New Orleans and Jackson railway a little north of Brookhaven, and proceeded to burn the station-house, cars, and bridges at the latter place. Then they went to Bogue Chitto with a
f, 2.544-2.550; occupation of by Rosecrans, 2.551; visit of the author to the battlefield of in 1866, 2.552; national cemetery at, 2.553. N. Nsasville, scenes in after the fall of Fort Donelson, 2.231-2.234; surrender of to Gen. Buell, 2.234; threatened by Forrest, 2.501; attempt of Forrest on, 2.539; Invested by Hood, 3.424; battle of, 3.425; visit of the author to in 1866, 3.430. Nashville, Confederate cruiser, short career of, 2.568; destruction of by Commander Worden, 3.190. Natchez, bombarded by Porter, 2.530. Natchitoches, Gen. Franklin at, 3.255. Navy, condition of before the outbreak of the war, 1.299; vessels purchased for the, 1.559; abundance of recruits for, 1.560; important services of during the war, 3.584. Navy-Yard at Gosport, history of the destruction of, 1.392-1.398. Navy-Yard at Pensacola, surrendered to the State authorities, 1. 169. Negley, Gen. James S., at Nashville, 2.264; his unsuccessful attempt on Chattanooga, 2.303. Negroes,
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 21: capture of New Orleans.--first attack on Vicksburg by Farragut's fleet and mortar flotilla.--junction of flag-officers Farragut and Davis above Vicksburg.--ram Arkansas. (search)
ed. The Anglo-American joined me on the 29th. and reported three batteries as having opened on her whilst passing Port Hudson. She received seventy-three shots in her en passant. I had received information that the rebel gun-boat Webb was at Natchez, to which city she had convoyed transports with supplies from Red River. I followed to that city, but found they had sought the protection of the Vicksburg guns. At Natchez, a boat's crew from the Essex were sent on shore to procure some ice fNatchez, a boat's crew from the Essex were sent on shore to procure some ice for my sick, when they were wantonly attacked by over two hundred armed citizens, wounding the officer in command, and killing one and wounding five seamen. I immediately opened tire on the lower town, and set a considerable number of the houses from whence they were firing on us on fire. After bombarding the place for an hour, the mayor unconditionally surrendered the city. I followed the rebel gun-boat Webb to the batteries at Vicksburg, under the guns of which she, with two transports, l
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
s may have been heroic, but it was far from wise, as the Confederates had at that period few troops along the river and no guns except field-pieces, which although they might annoy would hardly arrest the progress of vessels of war. Baton Rouge, Natchez, and in fact every town along the river, seemed to have entered into a league against the Federal vessels, putting it out of the power of the Union officers to exercise that forbearance they desired to show both from motives of policy and humanid property of all citizens were respected, and only the property claimed by the Confederate government was taken possession of. These were easy terms for people who had sturdily defied the Federal authority and refused to listen to any terms. Natchez offered fewer impediments to the Union commander. The mayor was a sensible man, compared with the one at Baton Rouge, and on receiving a communication from Captain Palmer to the effect that the city must surrender, he replied: Coming as a conqu
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 26: siege of Vicksburg. (search)
prisoners. In obedience to an order from Acting-Rear-Admiral Porter, commanding Mississippi squadron, I passed the batteries at Vicksburg and Warrenton on the night of the 13th of February last, having in tow two barges containing about 7,000 bushels of coal each, without being once struck, although eighteen shots were fired, all of which passed over us. I kept on down the river, but owing to dense fogs made but slow progress until the morning of the 16th, when, about ten miles below Natchez, I met the steamboat Era No. 5, having on board Colonel Ellet, of the rain fleet, and a portion of the officers and crew of the steamer Queen of the West. I then learned for the first time of the loss of that boat, and after consulting with Colonel Ellet, I concluded to continue on down as far as the mouth of the Red River. On the afternoon of the same day I got under way, the Era No. 5, leading. On nearing Ellis's Cliffs the Era made the prearranged signal of danger ahead, soon after wh
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
urg, a strong work impregnable to wooden gun-boats with light batteries. The expedition could proceed no further in this direction. Lieutenant-Commander Selfridge fortunately learned of a large amount of ammunition that had been sent up from Natchez, whence large quantities of provisions, stores and ammunition were often transported. Natchez took no part in the war beyond making money by supplying the Confederate armies. Selfridge captured at one place fifteen thousand rounds of smooth-Natchez took no part in the war beyond making money by supplying the Confederate armies. Selfridge captured at one place fifteen thousand rounds of smooth-bore ammunition, one thousand rounds of Enfield rifle and two hundred and twenty four rounds of fixed ammunition for guns, a rifled thirty-pounder Parrott gun-carriage, fifty-two hogsheads of sugar, ten puncheons of rum, nine barrels of flour and fifty barrels of salt; and General Walker's army being left without a supply of ammunition, he moved his forces into the interior and troubled the Mississippi no more. Thus these constant raids of the gun-boats harassed and weakened the enemy, broke u
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