hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 249 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 118 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 104 2 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 78 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 62 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 48 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 36 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 34 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Buras (Louisiana, United States) or search for Buras (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—the war on the Rapidan. (search)
sses marked the distances, carefully measured, at which the enemy's vessels could be reached with almost faultless precision. The task of the Federal navy, as will be seen, was a singularly difficult one. The government, yielding to the unthinking pressure of public opinion, was calling for the capture of Charleston. But DuPont was unable to imitate the bold stroke which had delivered up New Orleans to Farragut's fleet. The latter, after having forced the passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, had before him the immense artery of the Mississippi along which he could guide his vessels with impunity, whilst DuPont, had he proceeded as far as the third circle of defence prepared by the Confederates, would have found himself cut off from all chances of retreat. Having once reached this point, he could undoubtedly have bombarded and burnt a portion of the city of Charleston; but this barren success would have been dearly bought, for all the vessels which could have ventured so far