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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 249 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 118 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 104 2 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 78 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 62 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 48 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 36 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 34 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 23, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Buras (Louisiana, United States) or search for Buras (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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A Historical fact about Bombardments --The Calibre of a Fleet.--The following named steamers, under the chief command of Flag Officer David G. Farragut, made the attack on Forts St. Philip and Jackson and the Confederate gunboats at 3 A. M., 24th April, 1862: Hartford, Richmond, Pensacola, and Brooklyn each varying twenty-six 9-inch guns, two 30-pounder rifles two 12-pounder howitzers, in their tops, which were protected by a bulk head of boiler iron; Mississippi, nineteen 8-inch guns, eleven 20-pounder rifles, eighty-four 32-pounders; the remainder being howitzers. These ships were manned by about six thousand men. Only thirteen vessels passed the forts during the battle the remainder were driven back. Forts Jackson and St. Philip mounted about two hundred guns, of which number nineteen-twentieth were 32-pounders and 24-pounders. The Confederate gunboats numbered fourteen only, and carried forty-six guns. When the enemy's vessels passed the forts they were met by the g