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he views which led to the location of the capital. In the first place, the advantage of little depth of water of the Potomac River, its ease or difficulty of access, had nothing to do with the location of the capital. The port of Annapolis in Chess were to go through Baltimore, and if he could not go through Baltimore, he was to go around by sea to the mouth of the Potomac, and then up the Potomac to Washington. I thereupon, at eleven o'clock in the forenoon, after having waited for three been thirty-six hours coming from Philadelphia. Colonel Lefferts, their commander, had run down to the mouth of the Potomac River in pursuance of his declaration that he proposed to go to Washington by water. But it seemed that when he got to the whether he had best go to the relief of the capital, and was told by them that there were batteries on the banks of the Potomac for the purpose of preventing the advance of troops. Having received such authentic (?) information, he called a counci
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 13: occupations in 1863; exchange of prisoners. (search)
back into the Union. [Renewed applause.] no danger from the Army. There never has been any division of sentiment in the army itself. They have always been for the Union unconditionally, for the government and the laws at any and all times. And who are this army? Are they men different from us? Not at all. I see some here that have come back from the army, and are now waiting to recover their health to go back and join that army. Are they to be any different on the banks of the Potomac or in the marshes of Louisiana, or struggling with the turbid current of the Mississippi than they are here? Are our sons, our brothers, to have different thoughts and different feelings from us, simply because to-day they wear blue and to-morrow they wear black, or to-day they wear black and to-morrow they wear blue? Not at all. They are from us, they are of us, they are with us. The same love of liberty, ay, and you will pardon me for saying it, a little more love for the Union, have ca