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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Michigan, (search)
to chastise the Indians on the borders of Illinois. They penetrated the Indian country beyond the Wabash; but, becoming alarmed, returned to Vincennes, and left the honors of the campaign to be gathered by Ninian Edwards, governor of the Territory of Illinois, who had advanced up the Illinois River with about 400 men to co-operate with Hopkins. He succeeded in destroying several Indian villages above Peoria. Harrison, meanwhile, was busily employed in pushing forward provisions to forts towaIllinois River with about 400 men to co-operate with Hopkins. He succeeded in destroying several Indian villages above Peoria. Harrison, meanwhile, was busily employed in pushing forward provisions to forts towards the lake, whence his troops were to march for concentration at the rapids of the Maumee, where another depot was to be established. It was a miserable country to pass over —swampy, wooded, and made almost impassable by heavy rains. The troops became discontented and mutinous. Orders given to Tupper's division to advance to the Maumee Rapids were not, or could not be, obeyed; it fell back to Urbana. Harrison had been very anxious to retake Detroit before winter; but the nature of the
among the Illinois Indians, makes a portage from the Chicago to the Desplaines, descends the Illinois River nearly to Utica, where he meets a large concourse of chiefs and warriors......April 8, 1675 with Henry Tonti, Father Hennepin, and a party of thirty-three, descending the Kankakee and Illinois rivers, pass through Peoria Lake, Jan. 3, 1680, and erect Fort Crevecoeur on the east shore of theStates land on both sides of the Mississippi River, extending on the east from the mouth of the Illinois to its head and thence to the Wisconsin......Nov. 3, 1804 Piankeshaw Indians cede to the United States 2,616,921 acres west of the Wabash, opposite Vincennes......Dec. 30, 1805 Territory of Illinois created with Kaskaskia as the seat of government......Feb. 3, 1809 Ninian Edwards comm Deepening of the Illinois and Michigan canal to create a current from Lake Michigan to the Illinois River, begun in 1865, is completed......July 18, 1871 Illinois and Michigan Canal turned over t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Indiana, (search)
ion, 1890, 2,192,404; 1900, 2,516,462. Capital, Indianapolis. Robert Cavalier de la Salle and Henri Tonti, with a party of thirty-three, ascend the St. Joseph River to the site of South Bend, thence by portage to the Kankakee and down the Illinois River......December, 1679 La Salle, returning from Montreal with supplies for Tonti at Fort Crevecoeur, makes the portage from the St. Joseph to the Kankakee......November, 1680 Mention made of one Sieur Dubinson as commandant at a post near , Pottawattomie, Miami, Eel River, and Wea Indians cede to the United States land in eastern Indiana by treaty at Grouseland, near Vincennes......Aug. 21, 1805 Laws of Indiana published at Vincennes by Messrs. Stout & Smoot......1807 Illinois Territory set off from Indiana, comprising all west of the Wabash River and a line drawn north from Post Vincennes......Feb. 3, 1809 Property qualifications of 50 acres, or a town lot valued at $100, required of electors in Territory by act of Con
ninety-nine counties. Population, 1890, 1,911,896; 1900, 2,231,853. Capital, Des Moines. Father Marquette and Louis Joliet descend the Wisconsin River, reaching its mouth June 17, 1673; 100 miles below, on the western shore of the Mississippi, they discover an Indian trail, which they follow to an Indian village, where Marquette publishes to them the one true God ......June, 1673 Father Louis Hennepin, M. Dugay, and six other Frenchmen ascend the Mississippi from the mouth of the Illinois to the falls of St. Anthony, leaving Fort Crevecoeur, Ill......Feb. 28, 1680 Wife of Peosta, a Fox warrior, discovers lead in Iowa, on the west bank of the Mississippi......1780 At a council at Prairie du Chien, Julien Dubuque, a French-Canadian trader, obtains from Indians permission to work lead-mines at the place now bearing his name and a grant of 140,000 acres of land......1788 Land grant to Julien Dubuque by Indians is confirmed by Baron Carondelet, and a King's title issued.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kansas, (search)
ate, during......1543 Kentucky included in the charter of Virginia......1584 Colonel Wood, seeking trade with the Indians, explores Kentucky as far as the Mississippi......1654 Captain Bolt, from Virginia, travels in Kentucky......1670 Jacques Marquette, a Jesuit missionary, Louis Joliet, and five other Frenchmen, spend several days at the mouth of the Ohio......July, 1673 Chevalier Robert de la Salle and his lieutenant, Chevalier Henri de Tonti, with others, pass from the Illinois River down the Mississippi, stop a few days at the mouth of the Ohio, and claim both sides of the Mississippi for France......February, 1682 A vast tract, including Kentucky, deeded to the British by the Iroquois, by treaty at Albany, N. Y., concluded......1684 M. Longueil, from Canada, descends the Ohio, and discovers Big Bone Lick on a small creek which flows into the Ohio about 20 miles above the falls......1739 Dr. Walker, of Virginia, discovers the Kentucky River (which he call
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Minnesota, (search)
aul. Daniel Greysolon du Luth, a native of Lyons, builds a trading-post at the entrance of Pigeon River, on north shore of Lake Superior (whence the name Duluth)......1678 Father Louis Hennepin ascends the Mississippi from the mouth of the Illinois, passes through Lake Pepin, and reaches the falls, which he names St. Anthony......October, 1680 Sieur du Luth, with four Frenchmen and an Indian, in two canoes, from his trading-post reaches a lake whose outlet enters the Mississippi, and onof the river......Sept. 23, 1805 Rev. Samuel Peters alleges, in a petition to Congress, that he has purchased from the Carver American heirs their right to the grant made in 1767......1806 Minnesota east of the Mississippi included in Illinois Territory......1809 Part of Minnesota east of the Mississippi becomes a part of Michigan Territory......1819 Barracks erected at Mendota and occupied by a garrison which came from Green Bay, Wis., by the Wisconsin River......1819 Corner-ston
La Salle, La Salle County, Illinois a town of 3,993* pop., on Illinois River, at the intersection of the Illinois Central Railroad with the Chicago & Rock Island Railroad, and at the terminus of the Chicago Rock Island Canal, 81 miles from Chicago. The center of a very large trade. Coal is found in abundance in the vicinity.
Ottawa, La Salle County, Illinois a town of 10,000 pop., on Illinois River, near the mouth of Fox River, on the Chicago & Rock Island Railroad, 84 miles from Chicago. The falls in the river at this point furnish abundance of water power, which is employed in various manufactures. Immense quantities of grain are shipped from this point.
Peru, La Salle County, Illinois a town of 5,000 pop., on Illinois River and the Chicago & Rock Island Railroad, 82 miles from Chicago. Coal is found in abundance here.
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