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Henry, Marshall County, Illinois a town of 2,238 pop., on Illinois River, 33 miles by railroad N. N. E. of Peoria. Extensively engaged in the shipping of grain.
Lacon, Marshall County, Illinois a city of 3,000 pop., on Illinois River and Chicago & Rock Island Railroad, 26 miles from Peoria. Steamboats run up the river to this point, excepting in very low water. Large quantities of grain and produce are shipped from this point.
Chillicothe, Peoria County, Illinois a town of 663* pop., on Illinois River, at the head of Peoria Lake, 13 miles from Peoria. The Chicago & Rock Island Railroad passes through here.
Peoria, Peoria County, Illinois a city of 25,000 pop., on Illinois River, at the outlet of Peoria Lake. The river is navigable for steamboats to this point. Railroads connect with the principal cities in all directions. It also connects with Chicago by means of the Michigan Canal. Its central position makes it one of the most important commercial points in the State.
Winchester, Scott County, Illinois a town of 3,000 pop., on Big Sandy Creek, 10 miles from Illinois River and 18 miles from Jacksonville. Engaged in various manufactures. Coal is found here.
Pekin, Tazewell County, Illinois a town of 9,000 pop., on Illinois River, 12 miles below Peoria, on the Peoria, Pekin & Jacksonville Railroad. Steamboats connect with various points on the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers. Pekin, Tazewell County, Illinois a town of 9,000 pop., on Illinois River, 12 miles below Peoria, on the Peoria, Pekin & Jacksonville Railroad. Steamboats connect with various points on the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers.
enterprise, won the friendship of the natives. But clouds lowered over his path: the Griffin, it seemed certain, was wrecked, thus delaying his discoveries, as well as impairing his fortunes; his men began to despond: alone, of himself, he toiled to revive their courage;—there could be no safety but in union: None, he added, shall stay after the spring, unless from choice. But fear and discontent pervaded the company; and when La Salle planned and began to build a fort on the banks of the Illinois, four days journey, it is said, below Lake Peoria, thwarted by destiny, and almost despairing, he named the fort Crevecoeur. Yet here the immense power of his will appeared. Dependent on himself, fifteen hundred miles from the nearest French settlement, impoverished, pursued Chap. XX.} by enemies at Quebec, and in the wilderness surrounded by uncertain nations, he inspired his men 1680. with resolution to saw trees into plank and prepare a bark; he despatched Louis Hennepin to explor
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