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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The capture of Mason and Slidell. (search)
is views within himself. Having frequent occasion to visit his cabin I saw that he was deeply engaged in the perusal of international law books, from which he was taking copious notes. On November 1st, Lieutenant J. A, Greer, navigating officer, brought word to the ship that Mason and Slidell, with their secretaries and families, were booked for England by the steamer Trent to St. Thomas, and thence by the regular West India packet to Southampton. The next day we went to sea, touching at Key West on the 3d. On the 4th we returned to the Cuban coast, and cruising along the northern shore awaited further information as to the movements of the Confederate representatives from Consul General Schufeldt. It was not received, and orders were given to bear away to the narrow channel of old Bahama, through which the Trent must necessarily pass on her way to St. Thomas. The point selected could not have been chosen to better advantage. Between the coral keys the distance across the channe
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The military situation-plans for the campaign-sheridan assigned to command of the cavalry-flank movements-forrest at Fort Pillow-General Banks's expedition-colonel Mosby-an incident of the Wilderness campaign (search)
ttanooga, thence along the line of the Tennessee and Holston rivers, taking in nearly all of the State of Tennessee. West Virginia was in our hands; and that part of old Virginia north of the Rapidan and east of the Blue Ridge we also held. On the sea-coast we had Fortress Monroe and Norfolk in Virginia; Plymouth, Washington and New Berne in North Carolina; Beaufort, Folly and Morris islands, Hilton Head, Port Royal and Fort Pulaski in South Carolina and Georgia; Fernandina, St. Augustine, Key West and Pensacola in Florida. The balance of the Southern territory, an empire in extent, was still in the hands of the enemy. Sherman, who had succeeded me in the command of the military division of the Mississippi, commanded all the troops in the territory west of the Alleghenies and north of Natchez, with a large movable force about Chattanooga. His command was subdivided into four departments, but the commanders all reported to Sherman and were subject to his orders. This arrangement
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, chapter 2 (search)
nd if there should ever be a black monarchy in South Carolina, he will be its king. January 15, 1863. This morning is like May. Yesterday I saw bluebirds and a butterfly; so this winter of a fortnight is over. I fancy there is a trifle less coughing in the camp. We hear of other stations in the Department where the mortality, chiefly from yellow fever, has been frightful. Dr. - is rubbing his hands professionally over the fearful tales of the surgeon of a New York regiment, just from Key West, who has had two hundred cases of the fever. I suppose he is a skilful, highly educated man, said I. Yes, he responded with enthusiasm. Why, he had seventy deaths! as if that proved his superiority past question. January 19, 1863. And first, sitting proud as a king on his throne, At the head of them all rode Sir Richard Tyrone. But I fancy that Sir Richard felt not much better satisfied with his following than I to-day. J. R. L, said once that nothing was quite so good as turtl
ct a slavery or a party question, is so regarded. Witness the temper manifested by the Republicans in the free States, and even by the Union men in the South. I would therefore terminate it as a safe means for changing the issue. I deem it fortunate that the last administration created the necessity. For the rest, I would simultaneously defend and reinforce all the ports in the Gulf, and have the navy recalled from foreign stations to be prepared for a blockade. Put the island of Key West under martial law. This will raise distinctly the question of Union or Disunion. I would maintain every fort and possession in the South. For foreign nations. I would demand explanations from Spain and France, categorically, at once. I would seek explanations from Great Britain and Russia, and send agents into Canada, Mexico, and Central America, to rouse a vigorous continental spirit of independence on this continent against European intervention. And, if satisfactory ex
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Chapter 1: secession. (search)
protest by the officer in charge-salutes to the flag, peaceable evacuation, and unmolested transit home being graciously permitted as military courtesy. To this course of procedure three exceptions occurred: first, no attempt was made against Fort Taylor at Key West, Fort Jefferson on Tortugas Island, and Fort Pickens at Pensacola, on account of the distance and danger; second, part of the troops in Texas were eventually refused the promised transit and captured; and third, the forts in Charle transit home being graciously permitted as military courtesy. To this course of procedure three exceptions occurred: first, no attempt was made against Fort Taylor at Key West, Fort Jefferson on Tortugas Island, and Fort Pickens at Pensacola, on account of the distance and danger; second, part of the troops in Texas were eventually refused the promised transit and captured; and third, the forts in Charleston Harbor underwent peculiar vicissitudes, to be specially narrated in the next chapter.
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Index. (search)
ncoln's decision with regard to, 55; preparations for the siege of, 56; its evacuation demanded, 60; siege begun, 62; strength of, 63; its disadvantages in the siege, 65; surrender of, 63; the effect at the North of the attack on, 72 T. Taylor, Fort, at Key West, 16 Tennessee, 80, 133 et seq.; East, 135 Texas, course of the conspirators in, 13; ordinance of secession submitted to popular vote, 13; attitude of, with regard to secession, 13 et seq.; secession of, 14 Thomas, SecrKey West, 16 Tennessee, 80, 133 et seq.; East, 135 Texas, course of the conspirators in, 13; ordinance of secession submitted to popular vote, 13; attitude of, with regard to secession, 13 et seq.; secession of, 14 Thomas, Secretary, 26 Thomas, Colonel, 166 Thompson, Jeff., 118 Thompson, Secretary, 17, 20, 30, 33 Toombs, Senator, 12, 42 Toucey, Secretary, 33 Townsend, Colonel, 153 Twiggs, General, treachery of, 14 Tyler, General, Daniel, commands First Division in the advance on Manassas, 174; his advance, 177, 178 U. Union Mills Ford, 176, note V. Varian, Captain, 174 Vernon, Mount, Va, 102 Vienna Station, Va., ambush at, 172 Virginia, attitude of,with regard to secession, 5
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
northern border, the Potomac River, a small area about the mouth of James River covered by the troops at Norfolk and Fort Monroe, and the territory covered by the Army of the Potomac lying along the Rapidan, was in the possession of the enemy. Along the seacoast footholds had been obtained at Plymouth, Washington, and New Berne, in North Carolina; Beaufort, Folly, and Morris Islands, Hilton Head, Fort Pulaski, and Port Royal, in South Carolina; Fernandina and Saint Augustine, in Florida. Key West and Pensacola were also in our possession, while all the important ports were blockaded by the Navy. The accompanying map, See explanatory foot-note, Vol, XXXII, Part III, p. 261. a copy of which was sent to General Sherman andl other commanders in March, 1864, shows by red lines the territory occupied by us at the beginning of the rebellion and at the opening of the campaign of 1864, while those in blue are the lines which it was proposed to occupy. Behind the Union lines there were
outh, because it would be irritating, and so nearly impracticable withal. Thus far the conservative men of the North, who, though they differed from the Confederates, mingled no fanaticism with the divergence of policies, were making strenuous efforts to stay the ill-advised policy of coercion. In the United States Senate Stephen A. Douglas offered a resolution recommending the withdrawal of the garrisons from all forts within the limits of the States which had seceded, except those at Key West and the Dry Tortugas, needful to the United States for coaling stations. He said unless we intended to reduce the seceding States to subjection, that Sumter must revert to the power that should hold Charleston. Pensacola was entitled to Fort Pickens. I proclaim boldly, said the eloquent Senator, the policy of those with whom I act. We are for peace. Mr. Douglas knew that the occupation of the fort was a standing menace and provocation to the people of the South. The Southern people
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the defeat of Gen. Lee's Army at the battle of Gettysburg-opinions of leading Confederate soldiers. (search)
ion of Fortress Monroe, Yorktown and Norfolk in Virginia, with the control, by means of gunboats, of the Chesapeake, York river, and James river up to the mouth of the Appomattox — of the entire coast of North Carolina, except the mouth of Cape Fear river-of Port Royal and Beaufort island on the coast of South Carolina, with Charleston harbor blockaded and the city of Charleston besieged — of Fort Pulaski, at the mouth of the Savannah river, in Georgia--of the mouth of the St. John's river, Key West and Pensacola, in Florida--of the lower Mississippi, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and Memphis, with Vicksburg and Port Hudson besieged, the fall of which latter towns was all that was necessary to give complete possession of the Mississippi river--of West Tennessee, the northern portion of Middle Tennessee, all of Kentucky, northwestern Virginia, including the Valley of the Kanawha, the lower Valley of Virginia, and all of eastern Virginia north of the Rappahannock. At the same time the entir
Rhett, Jr., R. W. Barnwell, and C. G. Memminger, delegates to the General Congress of the seceding States. The United States arsenal at Mobile was taken by the secessionists at daylight this morning. It contained six stand of arms, 1,500 barrels of powder, 300,000 rounds of musket-cartridges, and other munitions of war. There was no defence.--Evening Post, Jan. 7. An appeal to the people of Florida, by the Charleston Mercury, to seize the forts and other defences at Pensacola and Key West, threatens the capture of the California treasure ships by letters of marque and privateers.--(Doc. 13.) Fast-day throughout the United States, by proclamation of the President. It is generally observed.--(Doc. 14.) Fort Morgan, at the entrance of Mobile Bay, was taken this morning by Alabama troops, and is now garrisoned by two hundred men.--The Press, Jan. 5. This evening a workingmen's meeting was held at Cincinnati, Ohio. Speeches were made, and resolutions adopted, dec
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