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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Forsyth, James W. 1835- (search)
Forsyth, James W. 1835- Military officer; born in Ohio in 1835; graduated at West Point in 1856; promoted first lieutenant in 1861 and brigadier-general in 1865. He served in the Maryland, Richmond, and Shenandoah campaigns. He wrote Report of an expedition up the Yellowstone River in 1875.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fremont, John Charles 1813-1890 (search)
ending the mountains. As will be seen, on reference to a map, ou this short mountain chain are the head-waters of four great rivers of the continent,—namely, the Colorado, Columbia, Missouri, and Platte Rivers. It had been my design, after having ascended the mountains, to continue our route on the western side of the range, and, crossing through a pass at the northwestern end of the chain, about 30 miles from our present camp, return along the eastern slope across the heads of the Yellowstone River, and join on the line to our station of August 7, immediately at the foot of the ridge. In this way, I should be enabled to include the whole chain and its numerous waters in my survey; but various considerations induced me, very reluctantly, to abandon this plan. I was desirous to keep strictly within the scope of my instructions; and it would have required ten or fifteen additional days for the accomplishment of this object. Our animals had become very much worn out with the len
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nez Perce Indians, (search)
ursuit. On Aug. 20, when he was at Camas Prairie, the Indians turned on him and stampeded and ran off his pack-train, which were partially recovered by his cavalry. The fleeing Indians then traversed some of the worst trails for man or beast on this continent, as General Sherman described it. Their course may thus be briefly given: The Nez Perces, after leaving Henry's Lake in Montana, passed up the Madison and Fire Hole Basin into the Yellowstone Park, and crossed the divide and the Yellowstone River above the falls and below the lake; then they crossed the Snowy Mountains, and moved down Clark's Fork, with General Howard on a hot trail. On Sept. 13 General Sturgis had a fight with them on the Yellowstone below the mouth of Clark's Fork, capturing hundreds of horses and killing a number of the Indians. Then the Indians crossed the Yellowstone, passed north through the Judith Mountains, and reached the Missouri River near Cow Island on Sept. 22, and the next day they crossed the M
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Montana, (search)
ins......January, 1743 Lewis and Clarke's expedition cross Montana to the Pacific Ocean. Returning, Captain Lewis descends the Missouri from the Great Falls, and Captain Clarke the Yellowstone from Livingstone, and meet at the mouth of the Yellowstone......1805 Emanuel Lisa builds a trading-post on the Yellowstone......1809 Gen. William H. Ashley, of St. Louis, builds a trading-post on the Yellowstone......1822 American Fur Company builds Fort Union on the Missouri, 3 miles above the mouth of the Yellowstone......1829 Steamboat Assiniboine, built by the American Fur Company, ascends the Missouri to Fort Union in 1833; winters near the mouth of Popular Creek......1835 Father Peter John de Smet visits the Flathead Indians in Gallatin Valley......1840 De Smet establishes a mission on the St. Mary's River in the Bitter Root Valley......September, 1842 De Smet establishes St. Ignatius mission in the Flathead Lake Valley......1845 American Fur Company builds Fo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Dakota, (search)
return from the Pacific......1806 Scottish colony, planted under a grant from the Hudson Bay Company, settles at Pembina......1812 Maj. S. H. Long, on a United States government expedition, reaches Pembina, and, finding it to be within the United States, takes possession and raises the stars and stripes......Aug. 8, 1823 Yellouwstone, a side-wheel steamboat built by the American Fur Company at Pittsburg, Pa., ascends the Missouri River as far as Fort Union, near the mouth of the Yellowstone......1832 Steamboat Assiniboine, built by the American Fur Company, returning to St. Louis from the Yellowstone, is burned with her cargo of furs, at the mouth of the Heart River......1836 By the organization of Nebraska Territory, May 30, 1854, and the State of Minnesota, May 11, 1858, the rest of the present Dakota is left without legal name or existence......May 11, 1858 Territory of Dakota, comprising the present States of North Dakota and South Dakota, organized by act of.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Yellowstone Park. (search)
Yellowstone Park. In 1872 Congress passed an act for setting apart a large tract of the public domain, about 40 miles square, lying near the head-waters of the Yellowstone River, on the northeastern slope of the Rocky Mountains, for a public park. Its present extent is about 5,500 square miles. It is dedicated to the pleasure and enjoyment of the people of the United States.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and observers, 1763-1846 (search)
Columbia River, they reached the Pacific at the close of the autumn, to pass the winter in their Fort Clatsop-log huts enclosed by a palisade. Here they had leisure to study the natives and to compile records. In March, 1806, they began the return journey. After surmounting the difficult snow-clad barrier in June, the party divided, Lewis making his way to the Falls of the Missouri, and exploring Maria's River, Clark returning to the head of Jefferson Fork, proceeding thence to the Yellowstone River, and following this down to the Missouri. Coming together again in August, they went to St. Louis in September, having consumed about two and one-third years in the wilds. The subsequent duties of Lewis as Governor of Louisiana Territory, and of Clark as Superintendent of Indian Affairs, delayed the preparation of the records, although Jefferson was ardent for their publication. In 1809, Lewis, while on his way to Washington and Philadelphia to take charge of the editing, met his