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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Chapter 4: up the St. John's. (search)
whole community. These little trips were called rest ; there was no other rest during those ten days. An immense amount of picket and fatigue duty had to be done. Two redoubts were to be built to command the Northern Valley; all the intervening grove, which now afforded lurking ground for a daring enemy, must be cleared away; and a few houses must be reluctantly razed for the same purpose. The fort on the left was named Fort Higginson, and that built by my own regiment, in return, Fort Montgomery. The former was necessarily a hasty work, and is now, I believe, in ruins; the latter was far more elaborately constructed, on lines well traced by the Fourth New Hampshire during the previous occupation. It did great credit to Captain Trowbridge, of my regiment (formerly of the New York Volunteer Engineers), who had charge of its construction. How like a dream seems now that period of daily skirmishes and nightly watchfulness! The fatigue was so constant that the days hurried by
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
776 PrincetonJan. 3, 1777 HubbardtonJuly 7, 1777 OriskanyAug. 6, 1777 BenningtonAug. 16, 1777 BrandywineSept. 11, 1777 Bemis's Heights (first), Sept. 19; (second)Oct. 7, 1777 PaoliSept. 20, 1777 GermantownOct. 4, 1777 Forts Clinton and MontgomeryOct. 6, 1777 Fort MercerOct. 22, 1777 Fort MifflinNov. 16, 1777 MonmouthJune 28, 1778 WyomingJuly 4, 1778 Quaker Hill (R. I.)Aug. 29, 1778 SavannahDec. 29, 1778 Kettle CreekFeb. 14, 1779 Brier CreekMar. 3, 1779 Stono FerryJune 20, 1779 776 PrincetonJan. 3, 1777 HubbardtonJuly 7, 1777 OriskanyAug. 6, 1777 BenningtonAug. 16, 1777 BrandywineSept. 11, 1777 Bemis's Heights (first), Sept. 19; (second)Oct. 7, 1777 PaoliSept. 20, 1777 GermantownOct. 4, 1777 Forts Clinton and MontgomeryOct. 6, 1777 Fort MercerOct. 22, 1777 Fort MifflinNov. 16, 1777 MonmouthJune 28, 1778 WyomingJuly 4, 1778 Quaker Hill (R. I.)Aug. 29, 1778 SavannahDec. 29, 1778 Kettle CreekFeb. 14, 1779 Brier CreekMar. 3, 1779 Stono FerryJune 20, 1779
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cathcart, William Schaw, Earl 1755-1843 (search)
Cathcart, William Schaw, Earl 1755-1843 Military officer; born in Petersham, England, Sept. 17, 1755; joined the British army in June, 1777, and came to the United States; later was aide to Gen. Spencer Wilson and General Clinton, and participated in the siege of Forts Montgomery and Clinton, and in the battles of Brandywine and Monmouth. In May, 1778, during the reception given in honor of Lord Howe, in Philadelphia, he led one section of the knights at the celebrated Mischianza (q. v.). Later he recruited and commanded the Caledonian Volunteers, which subsequently was called Tarleton's Legion. He returned to England in 1780, and was promoted lieutenant-general in 1801. He died in Cartside, Scotland, June 16, 1843.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clinton, Sir Henry 1738-1795 (search)
rvice against the oppressed colonists until June, 1782, when he returned to England. He Sir Henry Clinton. succeeded General Howe as commanderin-chief of the British forces in America in January, 1778. In October, 1777, Sir Henry undertook a diversion in favor of General Burgoyne, then making his way towards Albany from Canada, in accordance with the British Clinton's despatch and bullet. plan of conquest. Clinton, with a strong land and naval force, had captured Forts Clinton and Montgomery, in the Hudson Highlands (Oct. 6), and sent forces of both arms of the service up the river on a marauding excursion, hoping to draw Gates from Burgoyne's front to protect the country below. On the day after the capture of the forts Sir Henry wrote on a piece of tissue-paper the following despatch to Burgoyne: Nous y voici [here we are], and nothing between us and Gates. I sincerely hope this little success of ours may facilitate your operations. In answer to your letter of the 28th Se
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clinton, Fort, capture of (search)
eeble garrisons—Fort Constitution, opposite West Point, and Forts Clinton and Montgomery, on the west side of the river at the lower entrance to the Highlands, standing on opposite sides of a creek, with high, rocky shores. From Fort Montgomery, on the northern side of the stream, to Anthony's Nose, opposite, the Americans had s to prevent the passage of hostile vessels up that stream. Forts Clinton and Montgomery were under the immediate command of Gov. George Clinton, and his brother Gen.y Colonel Campbell, made a longer march, back of Bear Mountain, to fall on Fort Montgomery at the same time. Vaughan had a severe skirmish with troops sent out from instead, deserted to the British. Campbell and his men appeared before Fort Montgomery at 5 P. M. and demanded the surrender of both forts. It was refused, when a simultaneous attack Map: plan of attack of forts Clinton and Montgomery by both divisions and by the vessels in the river was made. The garrison (chiefly militi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Despard, John, 1745-1829 (search)
Despard, John, 1745-1829 Military officer; born in 1745; joined the British army in 1760; came to America in 1773; was present at the capture of Fort Montgomery and of Charleston; and was with Cornwallis in the campaign which culminated in the surrender at Yorktown. He was promoted colonel in 1795, and major-general in 1798. He died in Oswestry, England, Sept. 3, 1829.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fort Montgomery. (search)
Fort Montgomery. See Clinton, Fort.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Forts Clinton and Montgomery. (search)
Forts Clinton and Montgomery. See Clinton, Fort.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hudson River chain. (search)
roject for dividing the Union, occupied much of the attention of the patriots. First there were vessels sunk, and a sort of chevaux-de-frise constructed in the channel between Fort Washington, on Manhattan Island, and the Palisades. Great chain and mortars. Chevaux-de-frise were placed in the channel between Pollopel's Island and the western shore of the river, just above the upper entrance to the Highlands. A chain and boom were stretched across the river from Anthony's Nose to Fort Montgomery, at the lower entrance to the Highlands. In the spring of 1778 the most notable of all these obstructions, a heavy chain supported by huge logs, was stretched across the Hudson from West Point to Constitution Island, opposite. It was constructed at the Stirling Iron Works, in Warwick, Orange co., by Peter Townsend, under the supervision of Timothy Pickering. The task was performed in six weeks. The links were carted to New Windsor, where, at Captain Machin's forges, they were put to
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kingston, burning of (search)
Kingston, burning of Sir Henry Clinton's success in capturing Forts Clinton and Montgomery emboldened him to send a marauding expedition up the Hudson to make a diversion in favor of Burgoyne, hoping thereby to draw many troops from the army of Gates to defend the exposed country below. Early on the morning after the capture of the forts, Oct. 7, 1777, the boom and chain were severed, and a flying squadron of light armed vessels under Sir James Wallace, bearing the whole of Sir Henry's land force, went up the river to devastate its shores. Sir Henry wrote a despatch to Burgoyne on a piece of tissue-paper, saying, We are here, and nothing between us and Gates, and enclosing it in a small, hollow bullet, elliptical in form, gave it to a messenger to convey to the despairing general. The messenger was arrested in Orange county as a spy. He swallowed the bullet, which an emetic compelled him to disgorge. The message was found and the spy was hanged. The marauding force, meanwhile
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