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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 61 5 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1 52 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 43 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 35 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 12 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 27, 1865., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Los Angeles (California, United States) or search for Los Angeles (California, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 33 results in 14 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), California (search)
California The largest of the Pacific coast States; noted for its admirable climate, its production of gold, its large commerce, and its great yield of fruit, State seal of California. which now finds a market even in Europe. In recent years the production of gold has decreased, but there has been a remarkable development of other mineral resources, especially petroleum. Reports on the foreign trade in the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900, showed at the ports of Humboldt, Los Angeles, San Diego, and San Francisco, imports of merchandise, $49,441,831; exports, $43,361,078; imports of gold and silver coin and bullion, $13,734,348; exports, $9,528,309. The production of the precious metals in the calendar year of 1899 was: Gold, $15,197,800; silver, $494,580. In 1900 the total assessed valuation of taxable property was $1,218,228,588, and the total bonded debt was $2,281,500, nearly all of which was held in State educational funds. The population in 1890 was 1,208,130; in 1900
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Census, United States (search)
, Mo.163,752132,71631,036 St. Paul, Minn.163,065133,15629,909 Rochester, N. Y.162,608133,89628,712 Denver, Col.133,859106,71327,146 Toledo, O.131,82281,43450,388 Allegheny, Pa.129,896105,28724,609 Columbus, O.125,56088,15037,410 Worcester, Mass.118,42184,65533,766- Syracuse, N. Y.108,37488,14320,231 New Haven, Conn.108,02781,29826,729 Paterson, N. J.105,17178,34726,824 Fall River, Mass.104,86374,39830,465 St. Joseph, Mo.102,97952,32450,655 Omaha, Neb.102,555140,452*37,897 Los Angeles, Cal.102,47950,39552,084 Memphis, Tenn.102,32064,49537,825 Scranton, Pa.102,02675,21526,811 Lowell, Mass.94,96977,69617,273 Albany, N. Y.94,15194,923*772 Cambridge, Mass.91,88670,02821,858 Portland, Ore.90,42646,38544,041 Atlanta. Ga.89,87265,53324,339 Grand Rapids, Mich.87,56560,27827,287 Dayton, O.85,33361,22024,113 Richmond, Va.85,05081,3883,662 Nashville, Tenn.80,86576,1684,697 Seattle, Wash.80,67142,83737,834 Hartford, Conn.79,85053,23026,620 Reading, Pa.78,96158,66120,30
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cremation, (search)
ich were then buried in mounds. The ancient method was to cremate the corpse upon a funeral pyre, upon which oil, spices, and incense, and, frequently, food and clothing were placed. The practice was never allowed among the early Christians, who followed the old Hebrew method of entombing the dead, a method which was hallowed by the burial of their Lord. The more Christianity spread, the more was cremation condemned, chiefly because it seemed inconsistent with the belief of the resurrection of the dead. At present the custom prevails in India, Japan, and other eastern countries. The practice is of comparatively recent origin in England, Germany, Italy, and the United States, but in these countries it has met with considerable opposition, the chief claims in its favor being on the score of sanitary beneficence. In the United States crematories are in operation in Washington, Lancaster, Philadelphia, Buffalo, Fresh Pond (L. I.), Detroit, St. Louis, Los Angeles, and other cities.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fremont, John Charles 1813-1890 (search)
ma Pass (June 15, 1846), with nine cannon and 250 muskets. De Castro was routed, and on July 5 the Americans in California declared themselves independent, and elected Fremont governor of the province. He then proceeded to join the American naval forces at Monterey, under Commodore Stockton, who had lately arrived, with authority from Washington to conquer California, Fremont appeared there with 160 mounted riflemen. On Aug. 17, 1846, Stockton and Fremont took possession of the city of Los Angeles; and at that place General Kearny, who had just taken possession of New Mexico, joined Stockton and Fremont, Dec. 27, 1846. Kearny would not sanction the election of Fremont as governor of California, and on Feb. 8, 1847, assuming that office himself, he declared the annexation of California to the United States. Fremont refused to obey General Kearny, his superior officer, who sent him to Washington under arrest, where he was tried by a court-martial, which sentenced him to be dismiss
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Junipero, Miguel Jose Serra 1713-1784 (search)
Junipero, Miguel Jose Serra 1713-1784 Missionary; born in the island of Majorca, Nov. 24, 1713; entered the Order of St. Francis in 1729; was sent to Mexico in 1750, where he was asigned to labor among the Indians of Sierra Gorda. When the Jesuits were expelled from Lower California in 1767, the Franciscans, under Junipero, were appointed to take charge of all the California missions. He founded the following missions: San Diego, Cal., July 16, 1769; San Carlos, at Monterey, June 3, 1770; San Antonio, July 14, 1771; San Gabriel, near Los Angeles, Sept. 8, 1771; San Luis Obispo, Sept. 1, 1772; San Francisco, June 27, 1776; San Juan Capistrano, Nov. 1, 1776; Santa Clara, Jan. 18, 1777; San Buenaventura, March 31, 1782. He died in Monterey, Cal., Aug. 28, 1784.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kearny, Stephen Watts 1794-1847 (search)
his own selection. Upon the general's arrival at Los Angeles, the capital of California, and the seat of the nowing reply, on the following day: Ciudad De Los Angeles, Jan. 17, 1847. Sir,—I have the honor to be inockton. headquarters, army of the West, Ciudad De Los Angeles, Jan. 16, 1847. Sir,—I am informed that you arockton to General Kearny. headquarters, Ciudad De Los Angeles, Jan. 16, 1817. Sir,—In answer to your note, rockton. headquarters, army of the West, Ciudad De Los Angeles, Jan. 17, 1847. Sir,—In my communication to yo that letter, he says: . . . When I entered Los Angeles I was ignorant of the relations subsisting betweeficer was then preparing for a march to Ciudad de Los Angeles, his force being principally sailors and marines,ing Battalion of California Volunteers, Ciudad de Los Angeles. About a month later, he received the followinh I had the honor to make to you at the Ciudad de Los Angeles for permission to proceed immediately to Mexico
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lummis, Charles Fletcher 1859- (search)
Lummis, Charles Fletcher 1859- Author; born in Lynn, Mass., March 1, 1859; was educated at Harvard College; walked from Cincinnati to Los Angeles, Cal., in 1884. This trip of 3,507 miles was made purely for pleasure and was accomplished in 143 days. He was editor of the Los Angeles Daily times, 1885-87. He lived for a number of years in an Indian village in New Mexico, became familiar with the manners and customs of the natives, and has travelled extensively in the Southwest, Mexico, and editor of the Los Angeles Daily times, 1885-87. He lived for a number of years in an Indian village in New Mexico, became familiar with the manners and customs of the natives, and has travelled extensively in the Southwest, Mexico, and South America. In 1894 he established in Los Angeles The land of sunshine, a monthly periodical. Among his publications are The land of Poco Tiempo; The Spanish pioneers; The man who married the Moon; The gold Fish of the Grand Chimu; A New Mexico David, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mexico, War with (search)
, 1846, with the garrison, nine cannon, and 250 muskets. He then defeated another force at Sonoma, and drove the Mexican authorities out of that region of country. On July 5 the Americans in California declared themselves independent, and put Fremont at the head of affairs. On the 7th Commodore Sloat, with a squadron, bombarded and captured Monterey, on the coast; on the 9th Commodore Montgomery took possession of San Francisco. Commodore Stockton and Colonel Fremont took possession of Los Angeles on Aug. 17, and there they were joined by Kearny, who had sent the main body of his troops back to Santa Fe. Fremont went to Monterey, and there assumed the office of governor, and proclaimed, Feb. 8, 1847, the annexation of California to the United States. Meanwhile, Colonel Doniphan, detached by Kearny, with 1,000 Missouri volunteers, marched towards Chihuahua to join General Wool. In two engagements with Mexicans he was victorious, and entered the capital of Chihuahua in triumph,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pacific Railway. (search)
itions for this purpose were organized to explore as many different routes. One, under Major Stevens, was instructed to explore a northern route, from the upper Mississippi to Puget's Sound, on the Pacific coast. A second expedition, under the direction of Lieutenant Whipple, was directed to cross the continent from a line adjacent to the 36th parallel of N. lat. It was to proceed from the Mississippi, through Walker's Pass of the Rocky Mountains, and strike the Pacific near San Pedro, Los Angeles, or San Diego. A third, under Captain Gunnison, was to proceed through the Rocky Mountains near the head-waters of the Rio del Norte, by way of the Hueferno River and the Great Salt Lake in Utah. The fourth was to leave the southern Mississippi, and reach the Pacific somewhere in Lower California—perhaps San Diego. These surveys cost about $1,000,000. Nothing further, however, was done, owing to political dissensions between the North and the South, until 1862 and 1864, when Congress, i
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pico, Pio 1801-1894 (search)
Pico, Pio 1801-1894 Governor; born in Los Angeles, Cal., May 5, 1801; appointed governor of Northern and Southern California in 1832, and reappointed in 1846. At this time the United States was at war with Mexico, and Pio Pico had instituted a revolution against Mexico in connection with his brothers, Jesus and Andres. Fremont advanced from Northern California and captured Gen. Jesus Pico, who was paroled. While under parole he took part in an insurrection, was discovered, and he was cost Mexico in connection with his brothers, Jesus and Andres. Fremont advanced from Northern California and captured Gen. Jesus Pico, who was paroled. While under parole he took part in an insurrection, was discovered, and he was condemned to death, but, at the solicitation of his mother and wife, was pardoned by Fremont. This action on the part of Fremont converted the Picos to the American cause. Pio Pico was the last Mexican governor of California. He died in Los Angeles, Sept. 11, 1894.
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