Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Chile (Chile) or search for Chile (Chile) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, John Quincy, 1767- (search)
act my predecessor, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, appointed successively ministers plenipotentiary to the republics of Colombia, Buenos Ayres, Chile, and Mexico. Unwilling to raise among the fraternity of freedom questions of precedency and etiquette, which even the European monarchs had of late found it necessary in a great measure to discard, he despatched these ministers to Colombia, Buenos Ayres, and Chile without exacting from those republics, as by the ancient principles of political primogeniture he might have done, that the compliment of a plenipotentiary mission should have been paid first by them to the United States. The inselates to these general subjects is among the papers now transmitted to the House. Similar instructions were furnished to the ministers appointed to Buenos Ayres, Chile, and Mexico, and the system of social intercourse which it was the purpose of those missions to establish from the first opening of our diplomatic relations with t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Almagro, Diego de, (search)
Almagro, Diego de, A Spanish conqueror of Peru, and principal associate of Pizarro; born about 1464. Almagro, Pizarro, and a priest named Luque undertook the conquest of Peru, and effected it, with a small force, in 1533. Almagro was appointed governor of what is now Chile in 1534, extending his conquests into that region in 1535. He and Pizarro became bitter enemies. He conquered Cuzeo, the ancient capital of Peru. In a decisive battle near that place. in 1538, Almagro was defeated, made prisoner, and put to death by order of Pizarro. in July, 1538. Almagro was profligate, perfidious, and cruel. His barbarous treatment of the inca Atahualpa covered his name and fame with infamy. The inca's son rallied men, who assassinated Pizarro, July 26, 1541, and these were excuted by order of the Viceroy of Peru in 1542.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Centennial Exhibition, (search)
49 acres of ground, and their annexes covered 26 acres more, making a total of 75 acres. The main building alone covered over 21 acres. The national government issued invitations to all foreign nations having diplomatic relations with the United States to participate in the exhibition by sending the products of their industries. There was a generous response, and thirty-three nations, besides the United States, were represented—namely, Argentine Republic, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chili, China, Denmark, Egypt, France, Germany, Great Britain and Ireland, India and British colonies, Hawaiian Islands, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Liberia. Luxemburg Grand Duchy, Mexico, Netherlands, Norway, Orange Free State, Peru, Portugal, Russia, Santo Domingo, Spain and Spanish colonies, Siam, Sweden, Switzerland, Tunis, Turkey, and Venezuela. A Woman's executive committee was formed, composed of Philadelphians, who raised money sufficient among the women of the Union for the erection of a buil
Chile. Towards the close of 1890, a revolution occurred in Chile, South America. It was the result of certain abuses of power on the paChile, South America. It was the result of certain abuses of power on the part of the President of that republic, and the conflict was carried on with great bitterness between his adherents and the revolutionary party ich had arrived from the Eastern States, and immediately sailed for Chile. On May 9 the United States warship Charleston was ordered in purs to drop. About the same time another complication arose between Chile and the United States. While the United States cruiser Baltimore wthe Matta note and also the request for Minister Egan's recall, and Chile paid an indemnity of $75,000. The affair was variously interpretas an instance of a vigorous national policy. During 1893 and 1894 Chile was shaken by several domestic revolutions, during which much Amerithe United States $250,000 for damage done during the revolutions. In 1896 Chile concluded peace treaties with all her neighbors. China
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chinese-American reciprocity. (search)
But on the other side of the Pacific lies the vast empire of China, which in extent of territory and density of population exceeds the whole of Europe. To be more particular, the province of Szechuen can muster more able-bodied men than the German Empire. The province of Shantung can boast of as many native-born sons as France. Scatter all the inhabitants of Costa Rica or Nicaragua in Canton, and they would be completely lost in that city's surging throngs. Transport all the people of Chile into China and they would fill only a city of the first class. Further comparisons are needless. Suffice it to say that China has her teeming millions to feed and to clothe. Many of the supplies come from outside. The share furnished by the United States might be greatly increased. According to the statistics published by the United States government, China in 1899 took American goods to the value of $14,437,422, of which amount $9,844,565 was paid for cotton goods. All the European co
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Diplomatic service. (search)
raordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Brussels. Bolivia. George H. Bridgman, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, La Paz. Brazil. Charles Page Bryan, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Rio de Janeiro. Chile. Henry L. Wilson, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Santiago. China. Edwin H. Conger, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Peking. Colombia. Charles Burdett Hart, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Pleniplde, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Bolivia. Señor Don Fernando E. Guachalla, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Brazil. Mr. J. F. de Assis-Brasil, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Chile. Señor Don Carlos Morla Vicuña, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. China. Mr. Wu Ting-Fang, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Colombia. Sefior Dr. Luis Cuervo Marquez, Charge d'affaires. Costa Rica
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Drake, Sir Francis, -1595 (search)
the coasts of South America, and returned in 1573 with greater wealth than he ever possessed before. Drake was welcomed as a hero; he soon won the title honorably by circumnavigating the globe. He had seen from a mountain on Darien the waters of the Pacific Ocean, and resolved to explore them. Under the patronage of the Queen, he sailed from Plymouth in December, 1577; passed through the Strait of Magellan into the Pacific Ocean; pillaged the Spanish settlements on the coasts of Peru and Chile, and a Spanish galleon laden with gold and silver bullion; and, pushing northward, discovered the bay of San Francisco, took possession of California in the name of his Queen, and named the country New Albion, or New England. He had sailed northward as high, probably, as latitude 46°, or near the boundary between Oregon and the British possessions, and possibly he went farther north, for he encountered very cold weather in June, and turned back. Drake entered a fine bay and landed his st
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Engineering. (search)
0 horsepower, and form a very important part of the plant. The other gravity motors are windmills and wave-motors. Wind-mills are an old invention, but have been greatly improved in the United States by the use of the self-reefing wheel. The great plains of the West are subject to sudden, violent gales of wind, and unless the wheel was automatically self-reefing it would often be destroyed. There have been vast numbers of patents taken out for wave-motors. One was invented in Chile, South America, which furnished a constant power for four months, and was utilized in sawing planks. The action of waves is more constant on the Pacific coast of America than elsewhere, and some auxiliary power, such as a gasoline engine, which can be quickly started and stopped, must be provided for use during calm days. The prime cost of such a machine need not exceed that of a steam plant, and the cost of operating is much less than that of any fuelburning engine. The saving of coal is a very
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Essex, the, (search)
ssex in the Pacific produced great excitement in the British navy, and the government sent out the frigate Phoebe, with one or two consorts, to attempt her capture. Porter heard of this from an officer who was sent into the harbor of Valparaiso, Chile, with prizes. He also learned that the Chilean authorities were becoming more friendly to the English than to the Americans. In consequence of this information, Porter resolved to go to the Marquesas Islands, refit his vessel, and return to the United States. He had captured almost every English whale-ship known to be off the coasts of Peru and Chile, and had deprived the enemy of property to the amount of $2,500,000 and 360 seamen. He had also released the American whalers from peril, and inspired the Peruvians and Chileans with the most profound respect for the American navy. Among the Marquesas Islands (at Nooaheevah) Porter became involved in hostilities with the warring natives. He had allowed his men great indulgence in po
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Evans, Robley Dunglison, 1863- (search)
, Robley Dunglison, 1863- Naval officer; born in Virginia; graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1863; took part in the attack on Fort Fisher, where he was severely wounded; was in command of the Yorktown in the harbor of Valparaiso, Chile, in 1891, during a period of strained relations between the United States and Chile; commanded the battle-ship Iowa and took an active part in the destruction of Cervera's fleet; was promoted rear-admiral in 1901. He is author of A sailor's log inia; graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1863; took part in the attack on Fort Fisher, where he was severely wounded; was in command of the Yorktown in the harbor of Valparaiso, Chile, in 1891, during a period of strained relations between the United States and Chile; commanded the battle-ship Iowa and took an active part in the destruction of Cervera's fleet; was promoted rear-admiral in 1901. He is author of A sailor's log and many magazine articles. Evarts, William Maxwell
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