Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 24, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Paducah (Kentucky, United States) or search for Paducah (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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n the late train last night, states that the Federals, to the number of about 20,000, were advancing upon Paris and Danville, Tenn., and had already passed Farmington, Ky., on their way to the points designated. Farmington is in the vicinity of Paducah. When our informant passed Danville and Paris great excitement prevailed, and the Federals were hourly expected. It is supposed that the 20,000 here spoken of constitute a part of the immense force which lately left Cairo for Tennessee miles of Columbus, and encamped on Thursday night in eight of the rebel watch-fires. He afterwards visited the towns of Millburn, Lovelaceville, and Blandville, surveying all the roads as he went. A part of Gen. Smith's command will return to Paducah to-day. Reach sentiment at the North. Forney, in his letter to the Press, from Washington says: "Some of our public men do not hesitate to say that, rather than bring back the seceded States into the Union, they would agree to a p
No appearance of Federal vessels at Paducah — the Yankee force in Murray — Early movements looked for. Nashville, January 23. --The Fort Henry correspondent of the Nashville Union and American says, that the Confederate steamer Dunbar went down the Tennessee river on Saturday last within twenty-five miles of Paducah, and reports that no Federal gun-boats were seen. Scouts from Fort Henry report the Federal force in Murray, Kentucky, to be between six and ten thousand infantrPaducah, and reports that no Federal gun-boats were seen. Scouts from Fort Henry report the Federal force in Murray, Kentucky, to be between six and ten thousand infantry, two thousand cavalry, and thirteen pieces of artillery. The heavy rains on the 19th and 20th instant rendered the water courses and roads almost impassable, and greatly impeded their movements. The intelligence direct from Green river is, that the Federals intend making early forward movements, and they have commenced the erection of fortifications on the South bank of the river. The heavy freshet in the Green river had washed away Gen. Buell's pontoon bridges, and also damaged the wo