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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 65 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 24, 1862., [Electronic resource] 20 4 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 20 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 29, 1862., [Electronic resource] 17 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 16 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 10, 1862., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 14 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 17, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Somerset, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) or search for Somerset, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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against the entrenchments by which Washington is protected, and behind which the Federal troops would fight to great advantage. Gen. McClellan dares not invade a country impassable for his artillery and baggage, and occupied by a wary enemy who has twice taken him at a disadvantage, and who could probably perplex him more than ever by retreating before him without a blow. In the remote districts the successes of the belligerents are pretty evenly balanced. Against the Federal victory at Somerset the Confederates now claim to set off the news of a victory received at St. Louis; out in no district whatever — neither in the interior nor on the coast — has such superiority been displayed as would give any prospect of the termination of the strife. Of the contrary, if we are to draw any conclusion at all from the barren History of the campaign, it is that each party is powerful enough to arrest the progress of the other, but powerless for any thing beyond. The one great fact establ