hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 128 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 21 3 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 3, April, 1904 - January, 1905 9 1 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 6 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 5 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 24, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Marlboro, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Marlboro, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

useless knowledge, because they do not understand them, and do not care to take the trouble of learning. That the people should be taught that war is a simple matter, requiring no special information or study, was, under the circumstances, to be expected, as it accords with human experience. The country was full of gentlemen of education and those distinguished in civil life, but without military information.--A few ideas gained from reading the campaigns of Wellington, Napoleon or Marlborough, was, perhaps, its greatest extent. When the time came for the people to arise these gentlemen must be officers, and, acting upon the popular but dogma "that generals are born and not made"-- Nemo vir magnus sine afflutu aliquo divino unquam fuit --and the army was soon filled with general and other officers incapable of performing the solemn and important duties that devolved upon them. Thus the good of the nation was scarified to ambition, personal selfishness and nepotism; and disas