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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 8 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 1, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Waterloo, Seneca County, New York (New York, United States) or search for Waterloo, Seneca County, New York (New York, United States) in all documents.

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iers.--Why have the Romans done such great things? Because six years instruction were, with them, required to make a soldier. A legion, composed of three thousand men, was worth forty thousand ordinary troops. With fifteen thousand men, such as the Guards, I would anywhere beat four hundred thousand.--You will not find me engaged in a war with an army of recruits." Such were the opinions of the greatest soldier of modern or ancient times. The British army, which finally conquered him at Waterloo, were enlisted men for life. In estimating the capacity of the Confederacy for a successful campaign, we are always talking of numbers, as if that were the only element of success. Numbers are absolutely a disadvantage without discipline. Great disparity of numbers has existed since the beginning of the war. It is the quality, and not the quantity, of the Confederate troops, and the advantage possessed by fighting on interior lines, which has neutralized the odds against us. We still