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person; but in the Southern struggle he was utterly reckless. This indifference to danger was evidently a trait of blood, and wholly unaffected. Nor, for a long time, did his incessant exposure of himself bring him so much as a scratch. On all the great battle-fields of Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania, as well as in the close and bitter conflicts of his cavalry at Fleetwood, Auburn, Upperville, Middleburg, South Mountain, Monocacy, Williamsport, Shepherdstown, Paris, Barbee's, Jeffersonton, Culpeper Court-House, Brandy, Kelly's Ford, Spotsylvania — in these, and a hundred other hotly-contested actions, he was in the very thickest of the fight, cheering on the sharpshooters, directing his artillery, or leading his column in the charge, but was never hurt. Horses were shot under him, bullets struck his equipments, pierced his clothes, or cut off curls of his hair, as at Fredericksburg, but none ever wounded him. In the closest melee of clashing sabres the plume of Stuart was
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., From the Rapidan to Frying-Pan in October, 1863. (search)
and the laughing Young remained master of the situation. Stuart had pushed on, meanwhile, toward Warrenton Springs, and just as the fight above described commenced, a gallant affair took place above. The enemy were attacked in the town of Jeffersonton, and after a hot fight forced back to Warrenton Springs, where the Jefferson Company again distinguished itself. The attempt was made to charge over the bridge, in face of the enemy's fire. In the middle of the structure the column suddenly y before them, and crossing his whole column Stuart pushed on upon the track of the enemy toward Warrenton, followed by the infantry, who had witnessed the feats of their cavalry brethren with all the satisfaction of outside spectators. In Jeffersonton and at Warrenton Springs many brave fellows had fallen, and sad scenes were presented. Lieutenant Chew had fought from house to house in the first named place, and in a mansion of the village this gallant officer lay dying, with a bullet thro
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., Major R--‘s little private scout. (search)
he conflict with Mars); pistol carefully loaded, in holster on his right side; and sabre in excellent order, jingling against his top boots. It was a saying of the worthy, that he generally kept his arms in good order, and on this occasion nothing was left to be desired. His pistol revolved at the touch, with a clear ringing click; and you could see your face in his sabre blade. Thus accoutred, and mounted on a good, active horse, he set off from Hazel river, and making a detour around Jeffersonton, came to an elevation in rear of Mr. —‘s house, where he stopped to reconnoitre. The Federal picket — of nineteen men, as he afterwards discovered — was at the bridge; and in the yard of the mansion were two videttes, with their horses tied to the trees under which they were lying. Whether he could succeed in driving in the whole picket was problematical, but the videttes were pretty sure game. He would either run them off or capture them. With the Major execution followed conc