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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 703 687 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 558 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 529 203 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 90 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 83 23 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 81 23 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 68 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 66 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 62 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War.. You can also browse the collection for Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) or search for Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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over to Mine Run; the bitter struggle in the Wilderness when General Grant advanced; the fighting all along the Po in Spotsylvania; the headlong gallop past the South Anna, and the bloody struggle near the Yellow Tavern, where the cavalier, who had view that they did all the fighting. General Lee, however, knew accurately what was done, and what was not done. In Spotsylvania, after Stuart's fall, he exclaimed: If Stuart only were here! I can scarcely think of him without weeping. The greain, Monocacy, Williamsport, Shepherdstown, Paris, Barbee's, Jeffersonton, Culpeper Court-House, Brandy, Kelly's Ford, Spotsylvania — in these, and a hundred other hotly-contested actions, he was in the very thickest of the fight, cheering on the sha Stuart and tell him to act upon his own judgment, and do what he thinks best — I have implicit confidence in him. In Spotsylvania, as we have seen, General Lee could scarcely think of him without weeping. The implicit confidence of Jackson, and th
l the cavalry separated them from him. The feeling which they then exhibited left no doubt of the entente cordiale between the members of the military family. General Hampton liked to laugh and talk with them around the camp fire; to do them every kindness he could-but that was his weakness towards everybody-and to play chess, draughts, or other games, in the intervals of fighting or work. One of his passions was hunting. This amusement he pursued upon every occasion-over the fields of Spotsylvania, amid the woods of Dinwiddie, and on the rivers of South Carolina. His success was great. Ducks, partridges, squirrels, turkey, and deer, fell before his double-barrel in whatever country he pitched his tents. He knew all the old huntsmen of the regions in which he tarried, delighted to talk with such upon the noble science of venery, and was considered by these dangerous critics a thorough sportsman. They regarded him, it is said, as a comrade not undistinguished; and sent him, in fr
Early, and these resolutely held their ground in face of an overpowering force. Thenceforward Early continued to add to his reputation as a hard fighter-at Bristoe, the second Manassas, Harper's Ferry, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Spotsylvania, Monocacy, and throughout the Valley campaign. During the invasion of Pennsylvania he led General Lee's advance, which reached the Susquehanna and captured York. In Spotsylvania he commanded Hill's corps, and was in the desperate fighting atSpotsylvania he commanded Hill's corps, and was in the desperate fighting at the time of the assault upon the famous Horseshoe, and repulsed an attack of Burnside's corps with heavy loss to his opponents. After that hard and bitter struggle the Federal commander gave up all hope of forcing General Lee's lines, and moving by the left flank reached Cold Harbour, where the obstinate struggle recommenced. It was at this moment, when almost overpowered by the great force arrayed against him, that General Lee received intelligence of the advance of General Hunter up the Val
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., Facetiae of the camp: souvenirs of a C. S. Officer. (search)
ter Port Republic, the General was riding along the line when he heard the following colloquy between two soldiers of the Stonewall Brigade. Curse the Yankees! I wish they were in hell, every one of them! I don't. Why don't you? Because if they were, Old Jack would be following 'em up close, with the old Stonewall Brigade in front! Jackson's face writhed into a grin; from his lips a low laugh issued; but he rode on in silence, making no comment. Xii. General C— was proverbial for his stubborn courage and bulldog obstinacy in a fight. In every battle his brigade was torn to pieces — for he would never leave the ground until he was hurled back from it, crushed and bleeding. The views of such a man on the subject of military courage are worth knowing. He gave them to me briefly one day, on the battle-field. Here is the statement of General C-. The man who says that he likes to go into an infantry charge, such as there was at Spotsylvania — is a l